Washington Nationals

Known as the Montreal Expos, 1969-2004


Ballparks of the Nationals
Jarry Park (1969-76); Olympic Stadium (1977-2004); Hi Bithorn Stadium (partial usage, 2003-04) RFK Stadium (2005-07); Nationals Park (2008-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates team record. * - World Series champion. # - National League champion. e - Eastern Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1969 52 110 .321 48 6 .240 582 125 52 4.33 Rusty Staub Jerry Robertson 1,212,608
1970 73 89 .451 17 7 .237 687 136 65 4.50 Rusty Staub Carl Morton 1,424,683
1971 71 90 .441 25.5 5 .246 622 88 51 4.12 Rusty Staub Bill Stoneman 1,290,963
1972 70 86 .449 26.5 5 .234 513 91 68 3.59 Ken Singleton Mike Marshall 1,142,145
1973 79 83 .448 3.5 4 .251 668 125 77 3.71 Ken Singleton Mike Marshall 1,246,863
1974 79 82 .491 8.5 4 .254 662 86 124 3.60 Willie Davis Mike Torrez 1,019,134
1975 75 87 .463 17.5 T-5 .244 601 98 108 3.72 Mike Jorgensen Don Warthen 908,292
1976 55 107 .340 46 6 .235 531 94 86 3.99 Larry Parrish Steve Rogers 646,704
1977 75 87 .463 26 5 .260 665 138 88 4.01 Gary Carter Steve Rogers 1,433,757
1978 76 86 .469 14 4 .254 633 121 80 3.42 Ellis Valentine Steve Rogers 1,427,007
1979 95 65 .594 2 2 .264 701 143 121 3.14 Larry Parrish Steve Rogers 2,102,173

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the Washington Nationals?
Andre Dawson > The Hawk, billed as the team’s franchise’s first genuine superstar—and for the most part, he met those expectations
Vladimir Guerrero > Titan of talent who produced awesome numbers in front of miniscule crowds during Expos’ final years
Tim Raines > Breathtaking wizard whose hitting and baserunning wrecked constant havoc on opponents
Rusty Staub > Popular early hero for expansion Expos, lovingly referred to as “Le Grand Orange” for his red hair


1980 90 72 .556 1 2 .257 694 114 237 3.48 Andre Dawson Steve Rogers 2,208,175
1981 60 48 .556 2 e 3/1 .246 443 81 138 3.30 Andre Dawson Bill Gullickson 1,534,564
1982 86 76 .531 6 3 .262 697 133 156 3.31 Al Oliver Steve Rogers 2,318,292
1983 82 80 .506 8 3 .264 677 102 138 3.58 Tim Raines Steve Rogers 2,320,651
1984 78 83 .484 18 5 .251 593 96 131 3.31 Tim Raines Charlie Lea 1,606,531
1985 84 77 .522 16.5 3 .247 633 118 169 3.55 Tim Raines Bryn Smith 1,502,494
1986 78 83 .484 29.5 4 .254 637 110 193 3.78 Tim Raines Floyd Youmans 1,128,981
1987 91 71 .562 4 3 .265 741 120 166 3.92 Tim Raines Tim Burke 1,850,324
1988 81 81 .500 20 3 .251 628 107 189 3.08 Andre Galarraga Pascual Perez 1,478,659
1989 81 81 .500 12 4 .247 632 100 160 3.48 Tim Raines Bryn Smith 1,783,533
1990 85 77 .525 10 3 .250 662 114 235 3.37 Tim Wallach Dennis Martinez 1,373,087
1991 71 90 .441 26.5 6 .246 579 95 221 3.64 Ivan Calderon Dennis Martinez 934,742
1992 87 75 .537 9 2 .252 648 102 196 3.25 Larry Walker Dennis Martinez 1,669,127
1993 94 68 .580 3 2 .257 732 122 228 3.55 Marquis Grissom John Wetteland 1,641,437
1994 74 40 .649 --- e 1 .278 585 108 137 3.56 Larry Walker Ken Hill 1,276,250
1995 66 78 .458 24 5 .259 621 118 120 4.11 Rondell White Pedro Martinez 1,309,618
1996 88 74 .543 8 2 .262 741 148 108 3.78 Henry Rodriguez Mel Rojas 1,616,709
1997 78 84 .481 23 4 .258 691 172 75 4.14 David Segui Pedro Martinez 1,497,609
1998 65 97 .401 41 4 .249 644 147 91 4.39 Vladimir Guerrero Ugueth Urbina 914,909
1999 68 94 .420 35 4 .265 718 163 70 4.69 Vlaidmir Guerrero Ugueth Urbina 773,277

Bushers Book
2000 67 95 .414 28 4 .266 738 178 58 5.13 Vladimir Guerrero Javier Vazquez 926,272
2001 68 94 .420 20 5 .253 670 131 101 4.68 Vlaidmir Guerrero Javier Vazquez 642,745
2002 83 79 .512 19 2 .261 735 162 118 3.97 Vladimir Guerrero Tomo Ohka 812,045
2003 83 79 .512 18 4 .258 711 144 100 4.01 Orlando Cabrera Livan Hernandez 1,025,639
2004 67 95 .414 29 5 .249 635 151 109 4.33 Brad Wilkerson Livan Hernandez 749,550
2005 81 81 .500 9 5 .252 639 117 45 3.87 Nick Johnson Chad Cordero 2,731,993
2006 71 91 .438 26 5 .262 746 164 123 5.03 Alfonso Soriano Chad Cordero 2,153,056
2007 73 89 .451 16 4 .256 673 123 69 4.58 Ryan Zimmerman Chad Cordero 1,943,812
2008 59 102 .366 32.5 5 .251 641 117 81 4.66 Cristian Guzman John Lannan 2,320,400
2009 59 103 .364 34 5 .258 710 156 73 5.00 Ryan Zimmerman John Lannan 1,817,226
2010 69 93 .426 28 5 .250 655 149 110 4.13 Adam Dunn Livan Hernandez 1,828,066
2011 80 81 .497 21.5 3 .242 624 154 106 3.58 Mike Morse Drew Storen 1,940,478
2012 98 64 .605 --- e 1 .261 731 194 105 3.33 Adam LaRoche Gio Gonzalez 2,370,794
2013 86 76 .531 10 2 .251 656 161 88 3.59 Jayson Werth Jordan Zimmermann 2,652,422
2014 96 66 .593 --- e 1 .253 686 152 101 3.03 Anthony Rendon Jordan Zimmermann 2,579,389
2015 83 79 .512 7 2 .251 703 177 57 3.62 Bryce Harper Max Scherzer 2,619,843

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the Nationals' History on This Great Game:

1981 baseball history1981: No Ball, One Strike The Expos make their only postseason appearance before their move to Washington thanks to a quickly expanded playoff format forged by owners desperate to keep fan interest high on the heels of a midseason player strike.


share this page with a friend Share this page with a friend.

Have a comment, question or request? Contact us at This Great Game.

© 2016 This Great Game.

The Nationals by the Decade


1960s No stranger to baseball with a proud minor league history that included the setting for Jackie Robinson’s pro debut, Montreal was given one of two National League expansion franchises in 1968. Named after Expo 67, the successful world fair that was held a year earlier in Montreal, the Expos barely had a year to put everything together, including revamping an existing 2,000-seat dive (Jarry Park) to 29,000. The inaugural 1969 team lost 110 games but it didn’t matter to Montreal fans who immediately embraced matinee idols such as Rusty (la Grand Orange) Staub and imperfect no-hit author Bill Stoneman.


1970s The Expos immediately shed their image as basement trash by continuously winning no fewer than 70 games—but remained stuck below the .500 needle for much of the decade, spinning their wheels trying to make that next step. The move from Jarry Park to massively modern Olympic Stadium in 1977, combined with the arrival of truly talented bats in Andre Dawson, Gary Carter and Larry Parrish, woke up a long-dormant offense and finally gave the Expos contender status by 1979, when it finished a mere two games shy of eventual champion Pittsburgh for the NL East title.


1980s The Expos took advantage of a hastily-expanded playoff concept in the wake of 1981’s midseason strike and made their first and only postseason appearance while based in Canada, taking the Dodgers the distance before bowing in the NLCS. A lively roster fueled by Dawson, solid-hitting, lightning-quick Tim Raines and pitching ace/Expo lifer Steve Rogers continually kept Montreal competitive if not in the heat of the pennant race. Alas, the Expos were one of the worst offenders in the owners’ collusion scandal of the late 1980s, lowballing many of their star players back to Montreal while other teams refused to bid.


1990s The decade began promisingly with a boatload of rich young talent (Larry Walker, Pedro Martinez, Moises Alou, John Wetteland, Marquis Grissom) that engineered baseball’s best record by 1994—but that year’s devastating player strike ruined any chance of a second postseason visit. Worse, new ownership in 1991 had little spending might and proceeded to tear the team apart by the late 1990s to stay in the black. Left over was exciting young slugger Vladimir Guerrero, who kept the team from sinking into a last-place hole.


2000s Jeffrey Loria bought the team in 2000 and made things worse, budgeting the Expos on a shoestring while demanding a new ballpark to replace overbearing Olympic Stadium, long since in a state of (sometimes dangerous) decay. When that failed, he sold the Expos to the other 29 major league owners—who nearly folded the franchise in 2002. Instead, the team relocated to Washington in 2005 and opened in new Nationals Park in 2008. Throughout it all, the results on the field were middling at best with little growth in talent.


2010s The momentum began to shift at decade’s start with the debuts of two wunderkinds: 100-MPH pitcher Stephen Strasburg and teenage hitting prodigy Bryce Harper. With some veterans peppered in, the Nationals finally put it all together in 2012 with their first non-strike year divisional title. As long as the team can build around Strasburg and Harper (should they remain healthy), the Nationals have a strong future to look forward to.