Toronto Blue Jays


Ballparks of the Blue Jays
Exhibition Stadium (1977-89); SkyDome/Rogers Centre (1989-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates team record. * - World Series champion. # - American League champion. e - Eastern Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1977 54 107 .335 45.5 7 .252 605 100 65 4.57 Ron Fairly Dave Lemanczyk 1,701,052
1978 59 102 .366 40 7 .250 590 98 28 4.54 John Mayberry Jim Clancy 1,562,585
1979 53 109 .327 50.5 7 .251 613 95 75 4.82 John Mayberry Tom Underwood 1,431,651
1980 67 95 .414 36 7 .251 624 126 67 4.19 John Mayberry Dave Stieb 1,400,327
1981 37 69 .349 23.5 7/7 .226 329 61 66 3.81 John Mayberry Dave Stieb 755,083
1982 78 84 .481 17 T-6 .262 651 106 118 3.95 Damaso Garcia Dave Stieb 1,275,978
1983 89 73 .549 9 4 .277 795 167 131 4.12 Willie Upshaw Dave Stieb 1,930,415
1984 89 73 .549 15 2 .273 750 143 183 3.86 Lloyd Moseby Dave Stieb 2,110,009
1985 99 62 .615 --- e 1 .269 759 158 144 3.31 Jesse Barfield Dave Stieb 2,468,925
1986 86 76 .531 9.5 4 .269 809 181 110 4.08 Jesse Barfield Mark Eichhorn 2,455,477
1987 96 66 .593 2 2 .269 845 215 126 3.74 George Bell Jimmy Key 2,778,429
1988 87 75 .537 2 T-3 .268 763 158 107 3.80 Fred McGriff Dave Stieb 2,595,175

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the Toronto Blue Jays?
Joe Carter > Folk hero fondly recalled by Jays fans for his World Series-winning home run in 1993
Carlos Delgado > Unquestioned power source for Blue Jays in post-dynasty times, career team leader in many categories
Roy Halladay > Durable, preeminent AL pitcher of 2000s who had an uncanny knack for finishing what he started
Dave Stieb > Tough, sometimes luckless workhorse of 1980s who deserved more wins (and no-hitters)


1989 89 73 .549 --- e 1 .260 731 142 144 3.58 Fred McGriff Dave Stieb 3,375,883
1990 86 76 .531 2 2 .265 767 167 111 3.84 Fred McGriff Dave Stieb 3,885,284
1991 91 71 .562 --- e 1 .257 684 133 148 3.50 Joe Carter Jimmy Key 4,001,527
1992 96 66 .593 --- #*e 1 .263 780 163 129 3.91 Roberto Alomar Juan Guzman 4,028,318
1993 95 67 .586 --- #*e 1 .279 847 159 170 4.21 John Olerud Duane Ward 4,057,947
1994 55 60 .478 16 3 .269 566 115 79 4.70 Paul Molitor Pat Hentgen 2,907,933
1995 56 88 .389 30 5 .260 642 140 75 4.88 Roberto Alomar Al Leiter 2,826,483
1996 74 88 .457 18 4 .259 766 177 116 4.58 Ed Sprague Pat Hentgen 2,559,573
1997 76 86 .469 22 5 .244 654 147 134 3.92 Carlos Delgado Roger Clemens 2,589,297
1998 88 74 .543 26 3 .266 816 221 184 4.29 Carlos Delgado Roger Clemens 2,454,303
1999 84 78 .519 14 3 .280 883 212 119 4.92 Shawn Green David Wells 2,163,464
2000 83 79 .512 4.5 3 .275 861 244 89 5.14 Carlos Delgado Billy Koch 1,705,712
2001 80 82 .494 16 3 .263 767 195 156 4.28 Carlos Delgado Chris Carpenter 1,915,438
2002 78 84 .481 25.5 3 .261 813 187 71 4.80 Carlos Delgado Roy Halladay 1,637,900
2003 86 76 .531 15 3 .279 894 190 37 4.69 Carlos Delgado Roy Halladay 1,799,458
2004 67 94 .416 33.5 5 .260 719 145 58 4.91 Carlos Delgado Ted Lilly 1,900,041
2005 80 82 .494 15 3 .265 775 136 72 4.06 Vernon Wells Roy Halladay 2,014,995
2006 87 75 .537 10 2 .284 809 199 65 4.37 Vernon Wells Roy Halladay 2,302,212
2007 83 79 .512 13 3 .259 753 165 57 4.00 Alex Rios Roy Halladay 2,360,644
2008 86 76 .531 11 4 .264 714 126 80 3.49 Alex Rios Roy Halladay 2,399,786
2009 75 87 .463 28 4 .266 798 209 73 4.47 Adam Lind Roy Halladay 1,876,129
2010 85 77 .525 11 4 .248 755 257 58 4.22 Jose Bautista Shaun Marcum 1,495,482
2011 81 81 .500 16 4 .249 743 186 131 4.32 Jose Bautista Ricky Romero 1,818,103
2012 73 89 .451 22 4 .245 716 198 123 4.64 Edwin Encarnacion Casey Janssen 2,099,663
2013 74 88 .457 23 5 .252 712 185 112 4.25 Edwin Encarnacion Casey Janssen 2,536,562
2014 83 79 .512 13 3 .259 723 177 78 4.00 Jose Bautista Mark Buehrle 2,375,525
2015 93 69 .574 --- e 1 .269 891 232 88 3.80 Josh Donaldson Marco Estrada 2,794,891

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the Blue Jays' History on This Great Game:

1992 baseball history1992: Truly, A World Series After years of strong play, the Blue Jays finally reach the top and become baseball's first international champions.


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Bushers Book

The Blue Jays by the Decade


1970s Long teased with big league baseball, Toronto finally got an expansion team and began play in 1977, initially performing in the awkward configurations of piecemeal Exhibition Stadium. The early years were an exercise in torture for a responsive fan base, witnessing an average of 106 losses in the Jays’ first three years with over-the-hill castoffs like John Mayberry and Ron Fairly; there was even room in the starting lineup for future basketball star Danny Ainge, who lasted three years as an infielder with anemic hitting numbers.


1980s An infusion of exciting, genuine talent that mixed power and speed lifted the Blue Jays from the doldrums to contender status by mid-decade; the team’s first taste of the postseason became bitter after it blew a 3-1 game lead in the 1985 ALCS to Kansas City. From there, the Jays annually made the pennant chase behind sluggers George Bell, Fred McGriff and ace pitcher Dave Stieb, resulting in one more AL East title to close out the decade at sparkling new Skydome—which allowed Toronto to become the first major league city to seat four million fans in one season.


1990s A healthy mix of sage and pure baseball talent molded through a string of shrewd trades and signings elevated the Blue Jays to championship form, winning back-to-back World Series in 1992-93 behind the bats of Joe Carter, John Olerud and Paul Molitor, the speed and defense of Roberto Alomar and veteran pitchers Jimmy Key, Dave Stewart and Jack Morris. Overall bad pitching brought an end to the party by mid-decade as the team struggled just to regain .500 strength, despite the presence of slugger Carlos Delgado and a short but superb two-year stay by Roger Clemens.


2000s Ensconced in the difficult AL East with powerhouse foes in the Yankees and Red Sox (and later, even the Rays), the Blue Jays were too good to be lousy but not good enough to be great. With rare exception, Toronto constantly finished within a few games of the .500 mark, futilely fighting to reach the next level. Attendance slipped and star players shipped themselves out in frustration, including Delgado and ace pitcher Roy Halladay, the American League’s best pitcher of the new century before his exit to the perennial postseason-bound Phillies.


2000s Toronto’s middle-class existence within the majors continued even as the offense was given a burst of power from late bloomin’ boomers Jose Bautista and Edwin Encarnacion; a massive talent grab via free agency and trades in 2013 failed to shake the team to the top, but more moves in 2015 finally resulted in their first divisional title in 22 years.