Texas Rangers

Known as the Washington Senators, 1961-71


Ballparks of the Rangers
Griffith Stadium(1961); DC Stadium/RFK Stadium (1962-71); Arlington Stadium (1972-1993); The Ballpark at Arlington/Ameriquest Field/Rangers Ballpark in Arlington/Globe Life Park (1994-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates team record. * - World Series champion. # - American League champion. w - Western Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1961 61 100 .379 47.5 T-9 .244 618 119 81 4.23 Danny O'Connell Dick Donovan 597,287
1962 60 101 .373 35.5 10 .250 599 132 99 4.04 Chuck Hinton Tom Cheney 729,775
1963 56 106 .346 48.5 10 .227 578 138 68 4.42 Don Lock Claude Osteen 535,604
1964 62 100 .383 37 9 .231 578 125 47 3.98 Don Lock Claude Osteen 600,106
1965 70 92 .432 32 8 .228 591 136 30 3.93 Frank Howard Pete Richert 560,083
1966 71 88 .447 25.5 8 .234 557 126 53 3.70 Fred Valentine Ron Kline 576,260
1967 76 85 .472 15.5 T-6 .223 550 115 53 3.38 Frank Howard Phil Ortega 770,868
1968 65 96 .404 37.5 10 .224 524 124 29 3.64 Frank Howard Camilo Pascual 546,661
1969 86 76 .531 23 4 .251 694 148 52 3.49 Frank Howard Dick Bosman 918,106

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the Texas Rangers?
George W. Bush > Head of ownership group that plucked Rangers out of stifling Arlington Stadium and ushered in 1990s success
Ivan Rodriguez > One of the game’s greatest backstops; ten-time Gold Glover and All-Star with Rangers
Nolan Ryan > Fired final two no-hitters of illustrious career with Texas, later rose Rangers to prominence as co-owner
Michael Young > Thirteen-year Rangers veteran and all-time franchise hit king, excelled at all infield positions


1970 70 92 .432 38 6 .238 626 138 72 3.80 Frank Howard Dick Bosman 824,789
1971 63 96 .396 38.5 5 .230 537 86 68 3.70 Frank Howard Dick Bosman 655,156
1972 54 100 .351 38.5 6 .217 461 56 126 3.53 Dave Nelson Mike Paul 662,974
1973 57 105 .352 37 6 .255 619 110 91 4.64 Jeff Burroughs Jim Bibby 686,085
1974 85 76 .525 5 2 .272 690 99 113 3.82 Jeff Burroughs Ferguson Jenkins 1,193,902
1975 79 83 .488 19 3 .256 714 134 102 3.86 Toby Harrah Gaylord Perry 1,127,924
1976 76 86 .469 14 T-4 .250 616 80 87 3.45 Mike Hargrove Gaylord Perry 1,164,982
1977 94 68 .580 8 2 .270 767 135 154 3.56 Toby Harrah Bert Blyleven 1,250,722
1978 87 75 .537 5 T-2 .253 692 132 196 3.36 Bobby Bonds Jon Matlack 1,447,963
1979 83 79 .512 5 3 .278 750 140 79 3.86 Buddy Bell Jim Kern 1,519,671
1980 76 85 .472 20.5 4 .284 756 124 91 4.02 Al Oliver Danny Darwin 1,198,175
1981 57 48 .543 5 2/3 .270 452 49 46 3.40 Buddy Bell Doc Medich 850,076
1982 64 98 .395 29 6 .249 590 115 63 4.28 Buddy Bell Charlie Hough 1,154,432
1983 77 85 .475 22 3 .255 639 106 119 3.31 Larry Parrish Rick Honeycutt 1,363,469
1984 69 92 .429 14.5 7 .261 656 120 81 3.91 Buddy Bell Charlie Hough 1,102,471
1985 62 99 .385 28.5 7 .253 617 129 130 4.56 Pete O'Brien Charlie Hough 1,112,497
1986 87 75 .537 5 2 .267 771 184 103 4.11 Pete O'Brien Charlie Hough 1,692,002
1987 75 87 .463 10 T-6 .266 823 194 120 4.63 Ruben Sierra Charlie Hough 1,763,053
1988 70 91 .435 33.5 6 .252 637 112 130 4.05 Ruben Sierra Charlie Hough 1,581,901
1989 83 79 .512 16 4 .263 695 122 101 3.91 Ruben Sierra Kevin Brown 2,043,993

Bushers Book
14853
1990 83 79 .512 20 3 .259 676 110 115 3.83 Julio Franco Bobby Witt 2,057,911
1991 85 77 .525 10 3 .270 829 177 102 4.47 Ruben Sierra Nolan Ryan 2,297,720
1992 77 85 .475 19 4 .250 682 159 81 4.09 Juan Gonzalez Kevin Brown 2,198,231
1993 86 76 .531 8 2 .267 835 181 113 4.28 Juan Gonzalez Tom Henke 2,244,616
1994 52 62 .456 --- w 1 .280 613 124 82 5.45 Will Clark Kenny Rogers 2,503,198
1995 74 70 .514 4.5 3 .265 691 138 90 4.66 Will Clark Kenny Rogers 1,985,910
1996 90 72 .556 --- w 1 .284 928 221 83 4.66 Juan Gonzalez Ken Hill 2,889,020
1997 77 85 .475 13 3 .274 807 187 72 4.68 Juan Gonzalez John Wetteland 2,945,228
1998 88 74 .543 --- w 1 .289 940 201 82 5.00 Juan Gonzalez John Wetteland 2,927,399
1999 95 67 .586 --- w 1 .293 945 230 111 5.07 Rafael Palmeiro John Wetteland 2,771,469
2000 71 91 .438 20.5 4 .283 848 173 69 5.52 Rafael Palmeiro Kenny Rogers 2,588,401
2001 73 89 .451 43 4 .275 890 246 97 5.71 Alex Rodriguez Jeff Zimmerman 2,831,021
2002 72 90 .444 31 4 .269 843 230 62 5.15 Alex Rodriguez Kenny Rogers 2,352,397
2003 71 91 .438 25 4 .266 826 239 65 5.67 Alex Rodriguez John Thomson 2,094,394
2004 89 73 .549 3 3 .266 860 227 69 4.53 Mark Teixeira Francisco Cordero 2,513,685
2005 79 83 .488 16 3 .267 865 260 67 4.96 Mark Teixeira Kenny Rogers 2,525,221
2006 80 82 .494 13 3 .278 835 18353 4.60 Mark Teixeira Akinori Otsuka 2,388,757
2007 75 87 .463 19 4 .263 816 179 88 4.75 Ian Kinsler C.J. Wilson 2,353,862
2008 79 83 .488 21 2 .283 901 194 81 3.57 Josh Hamilton Vicente Padilla 1,945,677
2009 87 75 .537 10 2 .260 784 224 149 4.38 Ian Kinsler Scott Feldman 2,156,016
2010 90 72 .556 --- #w 1 .276 787 162 123 3.93 Josh Hamilton Neftali Feliz 2,505,171
2011 96 66 .593 --- #w 1 .283 855 210 143 3.79 Adrian Beltre C.J. Wilson 2,946,949
2012 93 69 .574 1 ! 2 .273 808 200 91 3.99 Josh Hamilton Matt Harrison 3,460,280
2013 91 72 .558 5.5 2 .262 730 176 149 3.62 Adrian Beltre Joe Nathan 3,178,273
2014 67 95 .414 31 4 .256 637 111 105 4.49 Adrian Beltre Yu Darvish 2,718,733
2015 88 74 .543 --- w 1 .257 751 172 101 4.24 Cecil Fielder Shawn Tolleson 2,491,875

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the Rangers' History on This Great Game:

2010 baseball history2010: Joy and Torture The Rangers emerge from bankruptcy and secure their first-ever pennant, before running into staunch pitching at the World Series against San Francisco.


2011 baseball history2011: What Wild Wednesday Wrought Surging September comebacks by St. Louis and Tampa Bay enliven a riveting final day of the regular season, ultimately setting the stage for one of the most memorable—and for the Rangers, one of the most heartbreaking—World Series ever played.


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The Rangers by the Decade


1960s The franchise began as baseball’s second iteration of the Washington Senators, immediately replacing the original team that left for Minnesota after 1960. The new Senators provided D.C. fans with the same old results—losing at least 100 games in each of their first four years, not finishing above .500 until their ninth year when first-year manager Ted Williams gave the Senators brief life. Behemoth slugger Frank Howard emerged into a home run machine and provided the Senators with the decade’s precious few positive highlights.


1970s Owner Bob Short, furious over poor attendance in D.C.—though lousy play through a series of rotten player signings on his part played a big role—moved the team to the Dallas-Ft. Worth suburb of Arlington, where continued losing, now spiced with hot and humid weather, attracted few fans at first. When Short sold, things improved quickly as the Rangers finished second in the AL West three times, but volatility became a troubling issue with star players and managers coming and going; when they won 94 games in 1977, they needed four managers to get the job done.


1980s For much of the decade, the Rangers trudged as anonymous participants, rarely contending despite the consistent knuckleballing exploits of pitcher Charlie Hough and the emergence of star hitter Ruben Sierra. But the team received support from a gradually growing fan base and helped Texas cross two million in attendance for the first time in 1989—the same year the Rangers brought in aging (but ageless) ace Nolan Ryan, solid hitters Julio Franco and Rafael Palmeiro, and a new managing general partner in future President George W. Bush.


1990s Ryan threw two no-hitters to enhance his legend and popularity in Arlington, the Rangers smacked the ball around with the addition of dangerous slugger Juan Gonzalez, and archaic Arlington Stadium was at long last replaced by a glitzy new ballpark next door—yet the Rangers continued to meddle around the .500 mark for much of the decade. That changed in 1996 when the team, in its 36th year of existence, finally made the postseason, adding additional AL West titles in 1998 and 1999; alas, the Rangers lost all three times in the first round to a resurgent New York Yankee team.


2000s The Rangers shot the moon in 2001 by signing superstar Alex Rodriguez to a gargantuan ten-year, $252 million contract—but as good as A-Rod was, the rest of the team suffered as owner Tom Hicks didn’t have the money left to build a contender around him. Rodriguez was dealt to the Yankees in 2004, and the Rangers struggled to regain form as great hitting was offset by horrid pitching in a live home ballpark. Ryan returned in a front office capacity and successfully rectified the porous pitching while lucking into the resurrection of slugger Josh Hamilton, a recovered substance abuse addict.


2010s The decade began in seismic fashion as Ryan became part owner after Hicks declared bankruptcy while, on the field, the franchise won back-to-back AL pennants—its first two ever—but bowed both times at the World Series, most heartbreakingly in 2011 with a seven-game defeat to St. Louis. The Rangers appear set for the near future (even without Ryan, who left after 2013) with a rich local TV deal and all-around young talent.