Tampa Bay Rays

Known as the Tampa Bay Devil Rays, 1998-2007


Ballparks of the Rays
Tropicana Field (1998-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates team record. * - World Series champion. # - American League champion. w - Eastern Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1998 63 99 .389 51 5 .261 620 111 120 4.35 Fred McGriff Rolando Arrojo 2,506,293
1999 69 93 .426 29 5 .274 772 145 73 5.06 Fred McGriff Roberto Hernandez 1,562,827
2000 69 92 .429 18 5 .257 733 162 90 4.86 Fred McGriff Roberto Hernandez 1,449,673
2001 62 100 .383 34 5 .258 672 121 115 4.94 Greg Vaughn Tanyon Sturtze 1,298,365
2002 55 106 .342 48 5 .253 673 133 102 5.29 Randy Winn Joe Kennedy 1,065,742
2003 63 99 .389 38 5 .265 715 137 142 4.93 Aubrey Huff Lance Carter 1,058,695
2004 70 91 .435 30.5 4 .258 714 145 132 4.81 Aubrey Huff Danys Baez 1,274,911

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the Tampa Bay Rays?
Evan Longoria > First true star hitter for the Rays who paralleled Tampa Bay’s rise to the top
Joe Maddon > Spirited manager with exceptional knack for keeping his players loose and upbeat
Vince Naimoli > Tireless champion of Tampa-St. Petersburg baseball who finally struck it rich by being granted expansion Devil Rays
Stuart Sternberg > Current Rays owner has presided over uniquely model organization and winning era


2005 67 95 .414 28 5 .274 750 157 151 5.39 Carl Crawford Danys Baez 1,141,699
2006 61 101 .377 36 5 .255 689 190 134 4.96 Carl Crawford Scott Kazmir 1,368,950
2007 66 96 .407 30 5 .268 782 187 131 5.53 Carlos Pena Scott Kazmir 1,387,603
2008 97 65 .599 --- #e 1 .260 774 180 142 3.82 Evan Longoria Matt Garza 1,811,986
2009 84 78 .519 19 3 .263 803 199 194 4.33 Ben Zobrist Jeff Niemann 1,874,962
2010 96 66 .593 --- e 1 .247 802 160 172 3.78 Carl Crawford David Price 1,864,999
2011 91 71 .562 6 ! 2 .244 707 172 155 3.58 Evan Longoria James Shields 1,529,188
2012 90 72 .556 5 3 .240 697 175 134 3.19 Ben Zobrist David Price 1,559,681
2013 92 71 .564 5.5 ! 2 .257 700 165 73 3.74 Evan Longoria David Price 1,510,300
2014 77 85 .475 19 4 .247 612 117 63 3.56 Evan Longoria Alex Cobb 1,446,464
2015 80 82 .494 13 4 .252 644 167 87 3.74 Logan Forsythe Chris Archer 1,247,668
2016 68 94 .420 25 5 .243 672 216 60 4.20 Evan Longoria Alex Colome 1,286,163

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the Rays' History on This Great Game:

2008 baseball history2008: Out of Darkness, Rays of Light The Rays, baseball's eternal doormats, complete one of the majors' most startling one-year turnarounds.


2011 baseball history2011: What Wild Wednesday Wrought Surging September comebacks by the Rays and St. Louis Cardinals fuel a memorable regular season finish.


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Bushers Book

The Rays by the Decade


1990s Since the 1980s, interests within the Tampa Bay-St. Petersburg area actively sought out a major league team for a move to Florida and a domed stadium ripe and ready for baseball; instead, they were often used as leverage for teams looking for sweeter new ballpark deals back home. When they actually bought the Giants in 1992, baseball rebuffed them with a lesser offer that kept the team in San Francisco. Finally, in 1995, an expansion franchise was awarded to Tampa Bay, and the Devil Rays began play in 1998 with predictable sub-.500 results—but the locals were just happy to see big league baseball played before their very eyes.


2000s The Devil Rays started with some promise but slowly regressed rather than progress, losing an average of 98 games through the first eight years of the decade. The dysfunction came to a sudden end in 2008 when the rechristened Rays, behind manager Joe Maddon and a newfound mix of veteran gamers and young stars, shocked the baseball world by winning the highly-competitive AL East and reaching the World Series against Philadelphia before losing in five games. This oasis of success would prove to be no mirage.


2010s The Rays continued to defy economic logic by consistently fielding strong, postseason-worthy teams via a strong farm system and shrewd free agent acquisitions—all achieved despite low payrolls and puzzling fan indifference—but the departures of manager Joe Maddon and general manager Andrew Friedman in mid-decade brought about a challenging new chapter which, thus far, has not led to renewed success. Meanwhile, the Rays are desperately seeking a new ballpark in the area to replace the ill-placed, increasingly archaic Tropicana Dome.