St. Louis Cardinals

Known as the St. Louis Browns, 1882-98; St. Louis Perfectos, 1899


Ballparks of the Cardinals
Sportsman’s Park I (1882-92); Robinson Field/Cardinal Park (1893-1920); Sportsman’s Park II/Busch Stadium (1920-1966); Busch Memorial Stadium (1966-2005); Busch Stadium (2006-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates modern era (1900 or later) team record. * - World Series champion. # - League champion. e - Eastern Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1882 37 43 .463 18 5 .231 399 11   2.92 Bill Gleason Jumbo McGinnis  
1883 65 33 .663 1 2 .255 549 7   2.23 Charles Comiskey Tony Mullane  
1884 67 40 .626 8 4 .249 658 11   2.67 Arlie Latham Dave Foutz  
1885 79 33 .705 --- #1 .246 677 17   2.44 Curt Welch Bob Caruthers  
1886 93 46 .669 --- #1 .273 944 20 336 2.49 Tip O'Neill Dave Foutz  
1887 95 40 .704 --- #1 .307 1,131 39 581 3.77 Tip O'Neill Bob Caruthers  
1888 92 43 .681 --- #1 .250 789 36 468 2.09 Tip O'Neill Silver King  
1889 90 45 .667 2 2 .266 957 58 336 3.00 Tip O'Neill Ice Box Chamberlain  
1890 78 58 .574 12 3 .273 870 48 307 3.67 Tommy McCarthy Jack Stivetts  
1891 86 52 .623 8.5 2 .266 976 58 283 3.27 Denny Lyons Jack Stivetts  
1892 56 94 .373 46 11 .226 703 45 209 4.20 Perry Werden Kid Gleason 192,442
1893 57 75 .432 20.5 10 .264 745 10 250 4.06 Perry Werden Ted Breitenstein 195,000
1894 56 76 .424 35 9 .286 771 54 190 5.29 Doggy Miller Ted Breitenstein 155,000
1895 39 92 .298 48.5 11 .281 747 38 205 5.76 Duff Cooley Ted Breitenstein 170,000
1896 40 90 .308 50.5 11 .257 593 37 185 5.33 Roger Connor Ted Breitenstein 184,000
1897 29 102 .221 63.5 12 .275 588 31 172 6.21 Klondike Douglass Red Donahue 136,400
1898 39 111 .260 63.5 12 .247 571 13 104 4.53 Lave Cross Jack Taylor 151,700
1899 84 67 .556 18.5 5 .285 819 47 210 3.36 Jesse Burkett Cy Young 373,909

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the St. Louis Cardinals?
Bob Gibson > Intimidating ace who turned it up in the postseason is all-time Cardinals win leader
Stan Musial > Immensely likeable Hall-of-Fame legend was embodiment of Cardinals from wartime heyday through early 1960s
Branch Rickey > Master of innovation put Cardinals firmly on their feet for generations to come with creation of farm system
Ozzie Smith > Fifteen-time All-Star and 13-time Gold Glover at shortstop, the “Wizard” was emblem of “Runnin’ Redbirds” teams of 1980s


1900 65 75 .464 19 T-5 .291 744 36 243 3.75 Jesse Burkett Cy Young 270,000
1901 76 64 .543 14.5 4 .284 792 39 190 3.68 Jesse Burkett Jack Powell 379,988
1902 56 78 .418 44.5 6 .258 517 10 158 3.47 George Barclay Mike O'Neill 226,417
1903 43 94 .314 46.5 8 .251 505 8 171 3.67 Patsy Donovan Chappie McFarland 226,538
1904 75 79 .487 31.5 5 .253 602 24 199 2.64 Jake Beckley Kid Nichols 386,750
1905 58 96 .377 47.5 6 .248 535 20 162 3.59 Homer Smoot Jack Taylor 292,800
1906 52 98 .347 63 7 .235 470 10 110 3.04 Pug Bennett Jack Taylor 283,770
1907 52 101 .340 55.5 8 .232 419 19 125 2.70 Red Murray Ed Karger 185,377
1908 49 105 .318 50 8 .223 372 17 150 2.64 Red Murray Bugs Raymond 205,129
1909 54 98 .355 56 7 .243 583 15 163 3.41 Ed Konetchy Slim Sallee 299,982
1910 63 90 .412 40.5 7 .248 639 15 179 3.78 Ed Konetchy Johnny Lush 355,668
1911 75 74 .503 22 5 .252 671 26 175 3.68 Ed Konetchy Bob Harmon 447,768
1912 63 90 .412 41 6 .268 659 27 193 3.85 Ed Konetchy Slim Sallee 241,759
1913 51 99 .340 49 8 .247 528 15 171 4.23 Ed Konetchy Slim Sallee 203,531
1914 81 72 .471 13 3 .248 558 33 204 2.38 Dots Miller Bill Doak 256,099
1915 72 81 .471 18.5 6 .254 590 20 162 2.89 Tom Long Slim Sallee 252,666
1916 60 93 .392 33.5 T-7 .243 476 25 182 3.14 Rogers Hornsby Bill Doak 224,308
1917 82 70 .539 15 3 .250 531 26 159 3.03 Rogers Hornsby Red Ames 288,491
1918 51 78 .395 33 8 .244 454 27 119 2.96 Rogers Hornsby Red Ames 110,599
1919 54 83 .394 40.5 7 .256 463 18 148 3.23 Rogers Hornsby Marv Goodwin 167,059
1920 75 79 .487 18 T-5 .289 675 32 126 3.43 Rogers Hornsby Bill Doak 326,836
1921 87 66 .569 7 3 .308 809 83 94 3.62 Rogers Hornsby Bill Doak 384,773
1922 85 69 .558 8 T-3 .301 863 107 73 4.44 Rogers Hornsby Jeff Pfeffer 536,998
1923 79 74 .516 16 5 .286 746 63 89 3.87 Rogers Hornsby Bill Doak 338,551
1924 65 89 .422 28.5 6 .290 740 67 86 4.15 Rogers Hornsby Bill Sherdel 272,885
1925 77 76 .503 18 4 .299 828 109 70 4.36 Rogers Hornsby Bill Sherdel 404,959
1926 89 65 .578 --- #*1 .286 817 90 83 3.67 Jim Bottomley Flint Rhem 668,428
1927 92 61 .601 1.5 2 .278 754 84 110 3.57 Frankie Frisch Pete Alexander 749,340
1928 95 59 .617 --- #1 .281 807 113 82 3.38 Jim Bottomley Bill Sherdel 761,574
1929 78 74 .513 20 4 .293 831 100 72 4.66 Chick Hafey Syl Johnson 399,887
1930 92 62 .597 --- #1 .314 1,004 104 72 4.39 Chick Hafey Syl Johnson 508,501
1931 101 53 .656 --- #*1 .286 815 60 114 3.45 Chick Hafey Syl Johnson 608,535
1932 72 82 .468 18 T-6 .269 684 76 92 3.97 George Watkins Dizzy Dean 279,219
1933 82 71 .536 9.5 5 .276 687 57 99 3.37 Pepper Martin Dizzy Dean 256,171
1934 95 58 .621 --- #*1 .288 799 104 69 3.69 Ripper Collins Dizzy Dean 325,056
1935 96 58 .623 4 2 .284 829 86 71 3.52 Joe Medwick Dizzy Dean 506,084
1936 87 67 .565 5 T-2 .281 795 88 69 4.47 Joe Medwick Dizzy Dean 448,078
1937 81 73 .526 15 4 .282 789 94 78 3.98 Joe Medwick Dizzy Dean 430,811
1938 71 80 .470 17.5 6 .279 725 91 55 3.84 Johnny Mize Bob Weialnd 291,418
1939 92 61 .601 4.5 2 .294 779 98 44 3.59 Johnny Mize Bob Bowman 400,245

“Anybody who’s ever had the privilege of seeing me play knows that I am the greatest pitcher in the world.”
—Cardinals ace pitcher Dizzy Dean


1940 84 69 .549 16 3 .275 747 119 97 3.83 Johnny Mize Lon Warneke 324,078
1941 97 56 .634 2.5 2 .272 734 70 47 3.19 Johnny Mize Ernie White 633,645
1942 106 48 .688 --- #*1 .268 755 60 71 2.55 Enos Slaughter Mort Cooper 553,552
1943 105 49 .682 --- #1 .279 679 70 40 2.57 Stan Musial Mort Cooper 517,135
1944 105 49 .682 --- #*1 .275 772 100 37 2.67 Stan Musial Mort Cooper 461,968
1945 95 59 .617 3 2 .273 756 64 55 3.24 Whitey Kurowski Harry Brecheen 594,630
1946 98 58 .628 --- #*1 .265 712 81 58 3.01 Stan Musial Harry Brecheen 1,061,807
1947 89 65 .578 5 2 .270 780 115 28 3.53 Whitey Kurowski Al Brazle 1,247,913
1948 85 69 .552 6.5 2 .263 742 105 24 3.91 Stan Musial Harry Brecheen 1,111,440
1949 96 58 .623 1 2 .277 766 102 17 3.44 Stan Musial Howie Pollet 1,430,676
1950 78 75 .510 12.5 5 .259 693 102 23 3.97 Stan Musial Max Lanier 1,093,411
1951 81 73 .526 15.5 3 .264 683 95 30 3.95 Stan Musial Max Lanier 1,013,429
1952 88 66 .571 8.5 3 .267 677 97 33 3.66 Stan Musial Gerry Staley 913,113
1953 83 71 .539 22 T-3 .273 768 140 18 4.23 Stan Musial Harvey Haddix 880,242
1954 72 82 .468 25 6 .281 799 119 63 4.50 Stan Musial Harvey Haddix 1,039,698
1955 68 86 .442 30.5 7 .261 654 143 64 4.56 Stan Musial Willard Schmidt 849,130
1956 76 78 .494 17 4 .268 678 124 41 3.97 Stan Musial Murry Dickson 1,029,773
1957 87 67 .565 8 2 .274 737 132 58 3.78 Stan Musial Larry Jackson 1,183,575

“What’s the best way to pitch to Stan Musial? That’s easy. Walk him and then try to pick him off first base.”
—Sportscaster and former Cardinals catcher Joe Garagiola


1958 72 82 .468 20 T-5 .261 619 111 44 4.12 Ken Boyer Sad Sam Jones 1,063,730
1959 71 83 .461 16 7 .269 641 118 65 4.34 Ken Boyer Larry Jackson 929,953
1960 86 68 .558 9 3 .254 639 138 48 3.64 Ken Boyer Ernie Broglio 1,096,632
1961 80 74 .519 13 5 .271 703 103 46 3.74 Ken Boyer Curt Simmons 855,305
1962 84 78 .519 17.5 6 .271 774 137 86 3.55 Bill White Bob Gibson 953,895
1963 93 69 .574 6 2 .271 747 128 77 3.32 Bill White Curt Simmons 1,170,546
1964 93 69 .574 --- #*1 .272 715 109 73 3.43 Ken Boyer Bob Gibson 1,143,294
1965 80 81 .497 16.5 7 .254 707 109 100 3.77 Lou Brock Bob Gibson 1,241,201
1966 83 79 .512 12 6 .251 571 108 144 3.11 Lou Brock Bob Gibson 1,712,980
1967 101 60 .627 --- #*1 .263 695 115 102 3.05 Orlando Cepeda Bob Gibson 2,090,145
1968 97 65 .599 --- #1 .249 583 73 110 2.49 Lou Brock Bob Gibson 2,011,167
1969 87 75 .537 13 4 .253 595 90 87 2.94 Lou Brock Bob Gibson 1,682,783
1970 76 86 .469 13 4 .263 744 113 117 4.06 Dick Allen Bob Gibson 1,629,736
1971 90 72 .556 7 2 .275 739 95 124 3.85 Joe Torre Steve Carlton 1,604,671
1972 75 81 .481 21.5 4 .260 568 70 104 3.42 Ted Simmons Bob Gibson 1,196,894
1973 81 81 .500 1.5 2 .259 643 75 100 3.25 Lou Brock Bob Gibson 1,574,046
1974 86 75 .534 1.5 2 .265 677 83 172 3.48 Lou Brock Lynn McGlothen 1,838,413
1975 82 80 .506 10 T-3 .273 662 81 116 3.57 Ted Simmons Al Hrabosky 1,695,270
1976 72 90 .444 29 5 .260 629 63 123 3.60 Lou Brock John Denny 1,207,079
1977 83 79 .512 18 3 .270 737 96 134 3.81 Ted Simmons Bob Forsch 1,659,287
1978 69 93 .426 21 5 .249 600 79 97 3.58 Ted Simmons John Denny 1,278,215
1979 86 76 .531 12 3 .278 731 100 116 3.72 Keith Hernandez Silvio Martinez 1,627,256
1980 74 88 .457 17 4 .275 738 101 117 3.93 Keith Hernandez Pete Vuckovich 1,385,147
1981 59 43 .578 --- 2/2 .265 464 50 88 3.63 Keith Hernandez Bob Forsch 1,010,247
1982 92 70 .568 --- #*e 1 .264 685 67 200 3.37 Lonnie Smith Joaquin Andujar 2,111,906
1983 79 83 .488 11 4 .270 679 83 207 3.79 George Hendrick John Stuper 2,317,914
1984 84 78 .519 12.5 3 .252 652 75 220 3.58 Willie McGee Bruce Sutter 2,037,448
1985 101 61 .623 --- #e 1 .264 747 87 314 3.10 Willie McGee John Tudor 2,637,563
1986 79 82 .491 28.5 3 .236 601 58 262 3.37 Vince Coleman Danny Cox 2,471,974
1987 95 67 .586 --- #e 1 .263 798 94 248 3.91 Jack Clark Joe Magrane 3,072,122
1988 76 86 .469 25 5 .249 578 71 234 3.47 Ozzie Smith Joe Magrane 2,892,799
1989 86 76 .531 7 3 .258 632 73 155 3.36 Pedro Guerrero Jose DeLeon 3,080,980

Bushers Book
1990 70 92 .432 25 6 .256 599 73 221 3.87 Willie McGee John Tudor 2,573,225
1991 84 78 .519 14 2 .255 651 68 202 3.69 Felix Jose Lee Smith 2,448,699
1992 83 79 .512 13 3 .262 631 94 208 3.38 Ray Lankford Bob Tewksbury 2,418,483
1993 87 75 .537 10 3 .272 758 118 153 4.09 Gregg Jefferies Bob Tewksbury 2,844,977
1994 53 61 .465 13 T-3 .263 535 108 76 5.14 Ray Lankford Bob Tewksbury 1,866,544
1995 62 81 .434 22.5 4 .247 563 107 79 4.09 Ray Lankford Tom Henke 1,756,727
1996 88 74 .543 --- c 1 .267 759 142 149 3.98 Ray Lankford Andy Benes 2,654,718
1997 73 89 .451 11 4 .255 689 144 164 3.90 Ray Lankford Matt Morris 2,634,014
1998 83 79 .512 19 3 .258 810 223 133 4.32 Mark McGwire Juan Acevedo 3,195,691
1999 75 86 .466 21.5 4 .262 809 194 134 4.74 Mark McGwire Kent Bottenfield 3,225,334
2000 95 67 .586 --- c 1 .270 887 235 87 4.38 Jim Edmonds Darryl Kile 3,336,493
2001 93 69 .574 --- c T-1 .270 814 199 91 3.93 Albert Pujols Matt Morris 3,109,578
2002 97 65 .599 --- c 1 .268 787 175 86 3.70 Albert Pujols Matt Morris 3,011,756
2003 85 77 .525 3 3 .279 876 196 82 4.60 Albert Pujols Woody Williams 2,910,386
2004 105 57 .648 --- #c 1 .278 855 214 111 3.75 Albert Pujols Jason Isringhausen 3,048,427
2005 100 62 .617 --- c 1 .270 805 170 83 3.49 Albert Pujols Chris Carpenter 3,538,988
2006 83 78 .516 --- #*c 1 .269 781 184 59 4.54 Albert Pujols Chris Carpenter 3,407,104
2007 78 84 .481 7 3 .274 725 141 56 4.65 Albert Pujols Jason Isringhausen 3,552,180
2008 86 76 .531 11.5 4 .281 779 174 73 4.19 Albert Pujols Kyle Lohse 3,432,917
2009 91 71 .562 --- c 1 .263 730 160 75 3.66 Albert Pujols Chris Carpenter 3,343,252
2010 86 76 .531 5 2 .263 736 150 79 3.57 Albert Pujols Adam Wainwright 3,301,218
2011 90 72 .556 6 #*! 2 .274 762 162 57 3.74 Lance Berkman Chris Carpenter 3,093,954
2012 88 74 .543 9 ! 2 .271 765 159 91 3.71 Matt Holliday Kyle Lohse 3,262,109
2013 97 65 .599 --- #c 1 .269 783 125 45 3.42 Matt Carpenter Adam Wainwright 3,369,769
2014 90 72 .556 --- c 1 .253 619 105 57 3.50 Matt Holliday Adam Wainwright 3,540,649
2015 100 62 .617 --- c 1 .253 647 137 69 2.94 Matt Carpenter Trevor Rosenthal 3,520,889
2016 86 76 .531 17.5 2 .259 779 225 35 4.08 Matt Carpenter Carlos Martinez 3,444,490

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the Cardinals' History on This Great Game:

1926 baseball history1926: One Hell of a Hangover Old pro Pete Alexander comes in cold—and sober, maybe—to famously rescue the Cardinals from the New York Yankees at the World Series.


1931 baseball history1931: The Peppering of Philly Aggressive and colorful, Pepper Martin leads the Cardinals in ending the Philadelphia A's two-year rule over baseball.


1934 baseball history1934: Dizzy, Daffy and Ducky The Cardinals' Gashouse Gang goes into full bully mode behind the dazzling Dean brothers.


1942 baseball history1942: The Home Grown Champions The Cardinals benefit from their vast farm system to become baseball's first wartime champion.


1946 baseball history1946: It's Good to be Home Baseball returns to normalcy after the end of World War II, and the Cardinals keep up the pace from their wartime success with a thrilling World Series against the Boston Red Sox.


1967 baseball history1967: The Impossible Dream The Red Sox make a surprise postseason appearance after years of struggle, but it's the Cardinals—led by pitcher Bob Gibson and speedster Lou Brock—who keep the Sox from envisioning their first world title in 50 years.


1968 baseball history1968: Year of the Pitcher The side effects of an increased strike zone reach epidemic proportions a amazing pitching feats abound everywhere—and become the centerpiece for a memorable seven-game World Series between the Cardinals and Detroit.


1982 baseball history1982: Streaking Engagement In a year of roller coaster pennant races, series comebacks and nail-biting finishes, the Cardinals get the last say with a come-from-behind World Series triumph over the high-powered Milwaukee Brewers.


1985 baseball history1985: The Missouri Stakes Blown calls and hot tempers put a controversial finish to the "I-70 Series" between the Cardinals and Kansas City.


1998 baseball history1998: The Maris Sweepstakes Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa embark on a historic record-breaking pursuit of Roger Maris' long-standing season home run mark.


2006 baseball history2006: Two Reluctant Enemies Best of friends, Tony La Russa and Jim Leyland overcome various hurdles and face off against one another in October.


2011 baseball history2011: What Wild Wednesday Wrought Surging September comebacks by the Cardinals and Tampa Bay Rays fuel a memorable regular season finish.


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The Cardinals by the Decade


19th Century On of three current NL teams, along with the Reds and Pirates, to begin play in the American Association’s maiden 1882 season, the Browns (as the Cardinals were known through 1898) evolved into a brawling powerhouse with four straight pennants in the late 1880s while winning, in 1887, the AA’s lone postseason triumph over the superior NL in the 19th Century version of the World Series. Orphaned to the NL in 1892 after the AA’s collapse, St. Louis spent the rest of the 1890s as a punching bag on the field (.357 winning percentage) and a punch line off it with twenty-five different men trying their hand at managing the team during the decade.


1900s The Cardinals were expected to strengthen in 1900 after merging with the woebegone Cleveland Spiders; things looked good to start, but the Cardinals were soon heavily savaged by player raids from the upstart American League—losing Cy Young, Jesse Burkett, Jack Harper and Jack Powell—and were further hurt when the AL produced local competition in the Browns. The result was a terrible decade in which the Cardinals frequently finished at or near the NL basement.


1910s There were fleeting moments of respectability amid continued disappointment in the standings, but the Cardinals turned heads at the executive level in 1911 by having the majors’ first female owner in Helene Britton, who inherited the club from her late father. The 1916 season would be a pivotal turning point for the franchise; Britton sold, the new owners named cunning 34-year-old Branch Rickey as club president, and 20-year-old second baseman Rogers Hornsby broke out and demonstrated signs of much bigger things to come.


1920s Having planted baseball’s first farm system to harvest exclusive talent to compete with the majors’ richer teams, Rickey turned the Cardinals into an ongoing contender with the help of Hornsby, who exploded to prime form by hitting .402 over a five-year stretch between 1921-25. In 1926, the Cardinals won their first NL pennant—and their first world title when they edged the New York Yankees in a thrilling seven-game series. St. Louis earned another pennant two years later, but the Yankees gained payback by flattening the Cardinals in four straight games.


1930s The Cardinal roster grew rambunctious with the famed “Gashouse Gang” collection of misfits, but they could sure play; each everyday position player hit over .300 in 1930, swaggering pitcher Dizzy Dean became the NL’s last 30-game winner in 1934, and gruff, dynamic power hitter Joe Medwick won the triple crown in 1937. St. Louis took three more pennants and two more World Series crowns—in 1931 behind Pepper Martin’s non-stop hustle, and in 1934 with a contentious seven-game triumph over Detroit led by Dean and Medwick.


1940s Rickey’s still-vaunted farm system became the Cardinals’ best friend as World War II broke out, able to feed the team with a healthy supply of talent while other teams struggled to replace everyday players who left to serve the war effort; as a result, St. Louis won three straight pennants (and two championships) between 1942-44 while winning at least 105 games per year. They remained strong after the war, winning another world title in 1946 behind aggressive outfielder Enos Slaughter and brilliant star hitter Stan Musial, who emerged as the decade’s best NL player.


1950s The highly popular Musial continued to dominate the league’s stat charts, but the Cardinals slowly descended into a vanilla existence in terms of wins and losses as Rickey had long since left for Brooklyn and the rest of baseball had caught up to St. Louis in building their own farm systems. The team remained attractive among the locals—especially after the emaciated Browns left town in 1954—yet it struggled to kick its game into high gear, always settling for something near the league median.


1960s Initially slow to racially integrate, the Cardinals ramped up and fully embraced the movement in the 1960s—and it triumphantly showed with fearless ace pitcher Bob Gibson, first baseman Bill White, gifted center fielder Curt Flood and lightning-fast Lou Brock. These players’ influence was a major factor in the Cardinals’ rise back to the top, winning three pennants and two World Series trophies during the decade—with Gibson and Brock in particular setting the Fall Classic afire with unstoppable performances.


1970s Despite the advent of divisional play and an enlarged postseason, the Cardinals were shut out of the playoffs for the entire decade as they rode the coattails of an aging Gibson and Brock without maintaining the championship momentum of the decade before. Still, the period didn’t lack for accomplishment, with two MVP winners (Joe Torre in 1971 and Keith Hernandez in 1979) and Brock setting (short-lived) season and career stolen base records. One lousy trade hurt: St. Louis sent future Hall-of-Fame pitcher Steve Carlton to Philadelphia, one-up, for Rick Wise in 1972.


1980s New manager Whitey Herzog forged the Cardinals back into championship shape using a lineup of relentless switch-hitters who lacked power but more than made up for it with fast legs and terrific defense; Vince Coleman, Willie McGee and shortstop extraordinaire Ozzie Smith excelled and accelerated the Cardinals’ stolen base total to a post-deadball era high of 314 in 1985. St. Louis won one World Series in 1982, was robbed of another in 1985 on a crucial blown call in Game Six, and came one game short of another crown in 1987.


1990s The Cardinals slowed up on the basepaths and in the standings; after Herzog stepped down and Torre failed to make it work for five years as his successor, Tony La Russa arrived from Oakland and many former A’s coaches and players followed—including bunyanesque slugger Mark McGwire, who re-energized his game and rewrote the record book in 1998 with his historic smashing of Roger Maris’ season home run record, racking up 70. Big Mac’s surge, later revealed to be steroid-enhanced, gave Cardinal fans something to cheer for in an otherwise lackluster decade.


2000s La Russa righted the franchise back to contender mode with a strong new group of horses—from Albert Pujols, the game’s premier offensive force of the new century’s first decade, to two ace-worthy hurlers in Chris Carpenter and Adam Wainwright. St. Louis made seven postseason appearances in the 2000s, resulting in two more pennants and a world title over Detroit in 2006—the same year in which a third, more modern baseball-specific version of Busch Stadium opened, with annual gates of three million and more from the loyal Cardinals fan base.


2010s The La Russa/Pujols era reached an exhilarating coda in 2011 when the Cardinals came from the dead in September and rallied for a spectacular seven-game Series triumph over Texas. With La Russa retired and Pujols lost to free agency, the Cardinals impressively skipped nary a beat as new boss Mike Matheny rode St. Louis to three straight NLCS appearances and one more NL pennant, in 2013. A smart front office, tough, balanced offense and a cache of highly touted young arms put the Cardinals in great shape for the foreseeable future.