Seattle Mariners


Ballparks of the Mariners
Kingdome (1977-1999); Safeco Field (1999-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates team record. * - World Series champion. # - American League champion. w - Western Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1977 64 98 .395 38 6 .253 624 133 110 4.83 Leroy Stanton Enrique Romo 1,338,511
1978 56 104 .350 35 7 .248 614 97 123 4.67 Leon Roberts Enrique Romo 877,440
1979 67 95 .414 21 6 .269 711 132 126 4.58 Bruce Bochte Mike Parrott 844,447
1980 59 103 .364 38 7 .248 610 104 116 4.38 Bruce Bochte Floyd Bannister 836,204
1981 44 65 .404 20 6/5 .251 426 89 100 4.23 Tom Paciorek Floyd Bannister 636,276
1982 76 86 .469 17 4 .254 651 130 131 3.88 Al Cowens Bill Caudill 1,070,404
1983 60 102 .370 39 7 .240 558 111 144 4.12 Pat Putnam Matt Young 813,537

“In this ballpark, I feel that when you walk to the plate you’re already in scoring position.”
—Don Baylor on the Seattle Kingdome


1984 74 88 .457 10 T-5 .258 682 129 116 4.31 Alvin Davis Mark Langston 870,372
1985 74 88 .457 17 6 .255 719 171 94 4.68 Phil Bradley Mike Moore 1,128,696
1986 67 95 .414 25 7 .253 718 158 93 4.65 Danny Tartabull Mike Moore 1,029,045
1987 78 84 .481 7 4 .272 760 161 174 4.49 Phil Bradley Mark Langston 1,134,255
1988 68 93 .422 35.5 7 .257 664 148 95 4.15 Alvin Davis Mark Langston 1,022,398
1989 73 89 .451 26 6 .257 694 134 81 4.00 Alvin Davis Scott Bankhead 1,298,443
1990 77 85 .475 26 5 .259 640 107 105 3.69 Ken Griffey Jr. Erik Hanson 1,509,727
1991 83 79 .512 12 5 .264 702 117 97 3.79 Ken Griffey Jr. Bill Swift 2,147,905
1992 64 98 .395 32 7 .263 679 149 100 4.55 Edgar Martinez Dave Fleming 1,651,367
1993 82 80 .506 12 4 .260 734 161 91 4.20 Ken Griffey Jr. Randy Johnson 2,052,638
1994 49 63 .438 2 3 .269 569 153 48 4.99 Ken Griffey Jr. Randy Johnson 1,104,206
1995 79 66 .545 --- w 1 .276 796 182 110 4.50 Edgar Martinez Randy Johnson 1,643,203
1996 85 76 .528 4.5 2 .287 993 245 90 5.21 Alex Rodriguez Sterling Hitchcock 2,723,850
1997 90 72 .556 --- w 1 .280 925 264 89 4.79 Ken Griffey Jr. Randy Johnson 3,192,237
1998 76 85 .472 11.5 3 .276 859 234 115 4.95 Ken Griffey Jr. Jamie Moyer 2,651,511
1999 79 83 .488 16 3 .269 859 244 130 5.24 Ken Griffey Jr. Jamie Moyer 2,916,346

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the Seattle Mariners?
Ken Griffey Jr. > Flashy can’t-miss prospect more than fulfilled his promise as his glove and bat shook Mariners out of prolonged infancy
Felix Hernandez > Like Griffey, leveraged teenage debut into stellar career; authored first perfecto in Seattle history
Edgar Martinez > Pure hitting star made possible by DH role; won two batting titles over 18-year career in Seattle
Ichiro Suzuki > Singles machine is MLB’s first Japanese superstar; amassed at least 200 hits in each of first ten years


2000 91 71 .562 0.5 ! 2 .269 907 198 122 4.50 Alex Rodriguez Aaron Sele 2,914,624
2001 116 46 .716 --- w 1 .288 927 169 174 3.54 Bret Boone Freddy Garcia 3,507,326
2002 93 69 .574 10 3 .275 814 152 137 4.07 John Olerud Jamie Moyer 3,542,938
2003 93 69 .574 3 2 .271 795 139 108 3.76 Bret Boone Jamie Moyer 3,268,509
2004 63 99 .389 29 4 .270 698 136 110 4.76 Ichiro Suzuki Eddie Guardado 2,940,731
2005 69 93 .426 26 4 .256 699 130 102 4.49 Richie Sexson Eddie Guardado 2,725,469
2006 78 84 .481 15 4 .272 756 172 106 4.60 Raul Ibanez J.J. Putz 2,481,165
2007 88 74 .543 6 2 .287 794 153 81 4.73 Ichiro Suzuki J.J. Putz 2,672,223
2008 61 101 .377 39 4 .265 671 124 90 4.73 Raul Ibanez Felix Hernandez 2,329,702
2009 85 77 .525 12 3 .258 640 160 89 3.87 Ichiro Suzuki Felix Hernandez 2,195,533
2010 61 101 .377 29 4 .236 513 101 142 3.93 Ichiro Suzuki Felix Hernandez 2,085,630
2011 67 95 .414 29 4 .233 556 109 125 3.90 Ichiro Suzuki Felix Hernandez 1,939,421
2012 75 87 .463 19 4 .234 619 149 104 3.76 Kyle Seager Felix Hernandez 1,721,920
2013 71 91 .438 25 4 .237 624 188 49 4.31 Kyle Seager Hisashi Iwakuma 1,761,546
2014 87 75 .537 11 3 .244 634 136 96 3.17 Robinson Cano Felix Hernandez 2,064,334
2015 76 86 .469 12 4 .249 656 198 69 4.16 Nelson Cruz Felix Hernandez 2,193,581

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the Mariners' History on This Great Game:

2001 baseball history2001: Raising Arizona The Mariners put together an unbelievable regular season with an American League record-shattering 116 wins—but the postseason proves less successful once the M's face the team that held the old record: The New York Yankees.


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The Mariners by the Decade


1970s The Mariners were Seattle’s second shot at the majors, after the one-year blunder that was the 1969 Pilots—who went bankrupt and transferred after one year to Milwaukee, igniting a lawsuit by local Seattle officials against baseball; the suit was dropped in exchange for a new expansion team. Hence came the Mariners in 1977, with a much better facility (the newly-built Kingdome) and better support—though attendance dropped from 1.3 million in their first year to under a million, as it would remain for a decade to come.


1980s The entire decade proceeded without a single winning season in Seattle as the Mariners couldn’t shake the expansion blues in the standings, finishing no higher than fourth in the seven-team AL West. Solid players abounded both at the plate and on the mound, but both star quality and depth of talent were lacking. Long-overdue hope arrived at decade’s end with the departure of pinchpenny owner George Argyros, a teenage hitting prodigy (Ken Griffey Jr.) in bloom and a raw, unrefined fastballer (Randy Johnson) with loads of potential.


1990s The impressive evolution of Griffey and Johnson was abetted with the emergence of an immense arsenal of slugging muscle, including productive DH Edgar Martinez and, by mid-decade, the jaw-dropping debut of power shortstop Alex Rodriguez. The M’s finally secured a winning season in 1991 and, four years later, enjoyed an explosive home stretch to erase a 13-game deficit and earn their first postseason berth. The resulting mania greatly helped tilt the local public (and government) to the side of building a new baseball-only facility; in 1999, Safeco Field opened to solid reviews.


2000s Johnson, Griffey and Rodriguez all fled Seattle in quick succession to start the decade—the latter two stars complaining of Safeco Field’s more spacious dimensions and cool marine air that favored pitching—but the Mariners only got better with a sturdier roster that included Japanese-born phenom Ichiro Suzuki, resulting in a spectacular record-breaking 116-46 effort in 2001. Suzuki remained hot for the rest of the decade, collecting 200-plus hits in each of his first ten years, but the Mariners in general regressed with occasional bumps in the standings and no further postseason appearances.


2010s Horrendous hitting sank the up and (mostly) down Mariners; even a move to reduce Safeco Field’s field dimensions in 2013 failed, at first, to lift the team out of their offensive funk. The local favorite remains ace pitcher Felix Hernandez, who has returned the love by signing a long-term contract to stay in Seattle and, in 2012, tossed the Mariners’ first-ever perfect game.


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