San Francisco Giants

Known as the New York Gothams, 1883-84; New York Giants, 1885-57


Ballparks of the Giants
Polo Grounds (1883-1957); Seals Stadium (1958-59); Candlestick Park/3Com Park (1960-99); Pac Bell Park/SBC Park/AT&T Park (2000-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates modern era (1900 or later) team record. * - World Series champion. # - National League champion. w - Western Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1883 46 50 .479 16 6 .255 530 24   2.94 Roger Connor Mickey Welch  
1884 62 50 .554 22 T-4 .255 693 23   3.12 Roger Connor Mickey Welch  
1885 85 27 .759 2 2 .269 691 16   1.72 Roger Connor Mickey Welch  
1886 75 44 .630 12.5 3 .269 692 21 155 2.86 Roger Connor Tim Keefe  
1887 68 55 .553 10.5 4 .279 816 48 415 3.57 Roger Connor Tim Keefe  
1888 84 47 .641 --- #1 .242 659 55 314 1.96 Roger Connor Tim Keefe  
1889 83 43 .659 --- #1 .282 935 52 292 3.47 Roger Connor Mickey Welch  
1890 63 68 .481 24 6 .259 713 25 289 3.06 Mike Tiernan Amos Rusie 60,667
1891 71 61 .538 13 3 .263 754 46 224 2.99 Mike Tiernan John Ewing 210,568
1892 71 80 .470 31.5 8 .251 811 39 301 3.29 Buck Ewing Amos Rusie 130,566
1893 68 64 .515 19.5 5 .293 941 61 299 4.29 George Davis Amos Rusie 290,000
1894 88 44 .667 3 2 .301 940 43 319 3.83 George Davis Amos Rusie 387,000
1895 66 65 .504 21.5 9 .288 852 32 292 4.51 Mike Tiernan Dad Clarke 240,000
1896 64 67 .489 27 7 .297 829 40 274 4.54 Mike Tiernan Jouett Meekin 274,000
1897 83 48 .634 9.5 3 .299 895 31 328 3.47 George Davis Amos Rusie 390,340
1898 77 73 .513 25.5 7 .266 837 34 214 3.44 George Van Haltren Amos Rusie 265,414
1899 60 90 .400 42 10 .281 734 23 234 4.29 Tom O'Brien Cy Seymour 121,384

“Damn! It’s great to be young and a Giant!”
—Second baseman Larry Doyle in 1914


1900 60 78 .435 23 8 .279 713 23 236 3.96 Kip Selbach Bill Carrick 190,000
1901 52 85 .380 37 T-6 .253 544 19 133 3.87 Gorge Van Haltren Christy Mathewson 297,650
1902 48 88 .353 53.5 8 .238 405 8 187 2.82 Steve Brodie Joe McGinnity 302,875
1903 84 55 .604 6.5 2 .272 729 20 264 2.95 Sam Mertes Joe McGinnity 579,530
1904 106 47 .693 --- #1 .262 744 31 283 2.17 Sam Mertes Joe McGinnity 609,826
1905 105 48 .686 --- #*1 .273 780 39 291 2.39 Mike Donlin Christy Mathewson 552,700
1906 95 65 .632 20 2 .255 625 15 288 2.49 Art Devlin Joe McGinnity 402,850
1907 82 71 .536 25.5 4 .251 574 23 205 2.45 Cy Seymour Christy Mathewson 538,350
1908 98 56 .636 1 T-2 .267 651 20 181 2.14 Mike Donlin Christy Mathewson 910,000
1909 92 61 .601 18.5 3 .254 624 26 240 2.27 Larry Doyle Christy Mathewson 783,700
1910 91 63 .591 13 2 .275 715 31 282 2.68 Fred Snodgrass Christy Mathewson 511,785
1911 99 54 .647 --- #1 .279 756 41 347 2.69 Larry Doyle Christy Mathewson 675,000
1912 103 48 .682 --- #1 .286 823 47 319 2.58 Larry Doyle Christy Mathewson 638,000
1913 101 51 .664 --- #1 .273 684 31 296 2.42 Larry Doyle Christy Mathewson 630,000
1914 84 70 .545 10.5 2 .265 672 30 239 2.94 George Burns Jeff Tesreau 364,313
1915 69 83 .454 21 8 .251 582 24 155 3.11 Larry Doyle Jeff Tesreau 391,850
1916 86 66 .566 7 4 .253 597 42 206 2.60 Benny Kauff Pol Perritt 552,056
1917 98 56 .636 --- #1 .261 635 39 162 2.27 George Burns Fredie Schupp 500,264
1918 71 53 .573 10.5 2 .260 480 13 130 2.64 George Burns Slim Sallee 256,618
1919 87 53 .621 9 2 .269 605 40 157 2.70 George Burns Jesse Barnes 708,857
1920 86 68 .558 7 2 .269 682 46 131 2.80 Ross Youngs Fred Toney 929,609
1921 94 59 .614 --- #*1 .298 840 75 137 3.55 Frankie Frisch Jesse Barnes 973,477
1922 93 61 .604 --- #*1 .305 852 80 116 3.45 Irish Meusel Phil Douglas 945,809
1923 95 58 .621 --- #1 .295 854 85 106 3.90 Frankie Frisch Ross Ryan 820,780
1924 93 60 .608 --- #1 .300 857 95 82 3.62 George Kelly Hugh McQuillan 844,068
1925 86 66 .566 8.5 2 .283 736 114 79 3.94 Irish Meusel Jack Scott 778,993
1926 74 77 .490 13.5 5 .278 663 73 94 3.77 Fred Lindstrom Virgil Barnes 700,362
1927 92 62 .597 2 3 .297 817 109 73 3.97 Rogers Hornsby Burleigh Grimes 858,190
1928 93 61 .604 2 2 .293 807 118 62 3.67 Fred Lindstrom Larry Benton 916,191
1929 84 67 .556 13.5 3 .296 897 136 85 3.97 Mel Ott Carl Hubbell 868,806
1930 87 67 .565 5 3 .319 959 143 59 4.61 Bill Terry Carl Hubbell 868,714

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the San Francisco Giants?
Barry Bonds > Disputed home run king dominated the majors and thrilled Giants fans for 15 years in San Francisco
Christy Mathewson > Among the greatest ever to pitch, Big Six help set sustained tone for Giants brilliance of early 1900s
Willie Mays > Arguably the game’s finest all-around talent who won hearts of fans in both New York and San Francisco
John McGraw > Diminutive, iron-fisted leader for 30 years at the Polo Grounds, producing ten pennants and numerous Hall-of-Fame careers


1931 87 65 .572 13 2 .286 768 60 83 3.30 Bill Terry Bill Walker 812,163
1932 72 82 .468 18 T-6 .276 755 116 31 3.83 Mel Ott Carl Hubbell 484,868
1933 91 61 .599 --- #*1 .263 636 82 31 2.71 Mel Ott Carl Hubbell 604,471
1934 93 60 .608 2 2 .275 760 126 19 3.19 Mel Ott Carl Hubbell 730,851
1935 91 62 .595 8.5 3 .286 770 123 32 3.78 Mel Ott Hal Schumacher 748,748
1936 92 62 .597 --- #1 .281 742 97 31 3.46 Mel Ott Carl Hubbell 837,952
1937 95 57 .625 --- #1 .278 732 111 45 3.43 Mel Ott Cliff Melton 926,887
1938 83 67 .553 5 3 .271 705 125 31 3.62 Mel Ott Carl Hubbell 799,633
1939 77 74 .510 18.5 5 .272 703 116 26 4.07 Mel Ott Carl Hubbell 702,457
1940 72 80 .474 27.5 6 .267 663 91 45 3.79 Mel Ott Hal Schumacher 747,852
1941 74 79 .484 25.5 5 .260 667 95 36 3.94 Mel Ott Cliff Melton 763,098
1942 85 67 .559 20 3 .254 675 109 39 3.31 Mel Ott Bill Lohrman 779,621
1943 55 98 .359 49.5 8 .247 558 81 35 4.08 Mickey Witak Ace Adams 466,095
1944 67 87 .435 38 5 .263 682 93 39 4.29 Mel Ott Bill Voiselle 674,483
1945 78 74 .513 19 5 .269 668 114 38 4.06 Mel Ott Van Lingle Mungo 1,016,468
1946 61 93 .396 36 8 .255 612 121 46 3.92 Johnny Mize Dave Koslo 1,219,873
1947 81 73 .526 13 4 .271 830 221 29 4.44 Johnny Mize Larry Jansen 1,600,793
1948 78 76 .506 13.5 5 .256 780 164 51 3.93 Johnny Mize Larry Jansen 1,459,269
1949 73 81 .474 24 5 .261 736 147 43 3.82 Bobby Thomson Dave Koslo 1,218,446
1950 86 68 .558 5 3 .258 735 133 42 3.71 Eddie Stanky Larry Jansen 1,008,878
1951 98 59 .624 --- #1 .260 781 179 55 3.48 Monte Irvin Sal Maglie 1,059,539
1952 92 62 .597 4.5 2 .256 722 151 30 3.59 Bobby Thomson Hoyt Wilhelm 984,940
1953 70 84 .455 35 5 .271 768 176 31 4.25 Monte Irvin Ruben Gomez 811,518
1954 97 57 .630 --- #*1 .264 732 186 30 3.09 Willie Mays Johnny Antonelli 1,155,067
1955 80 74 .519 18.5 3 .260 702 169 38 3.77 Willie Mays Johnny Antonelli 824,112
1956 67 87 .435 26 6 .244 540 145 67 3.78 Willie Mays Johnny Antonelli 629,179
1957 69 85 .448 26 6 .252 643 157 64 4.01 Willie Mays Ruben Gomez 653,923
1958 80 74 .519 12 3 .263 727 170 64 3.98 Willie Mays Stu Miller 1,272,625
1959 83 71 .539 4 3 .261 705 167 81 3.47 Willie Mays Sad Sam Jones 1,422,130
1960 79 75 .513 16 5 .255 671 130 86 3.44 Willie Mays Mike McCormick 1,795,356

Bushers Book
1961 85 69 .552 8 3 .264 773 183 79 3.77 Willie Mays Stu Miller 1,390,679
1962 103 62 .624 --- #1 .278 878 204 73 3.79 Willie Mays Billy O'Dell 1,592,594
1963 88 74 .543 11 3 .258 725 197 55 3.35 Willie Mays Juan Marichal 1,571,306
1964 90 72 .556 3 4 .246 656 165 64 3.19 Willie Mays Juan Marichal 1,504,364
1965 95 67 .586 2 2 .252 682 159 47 3.20 Willie Mays Juan Marichal 1,546,075
1966 93 68 .578 1.5 2 .248 675 181 29 3.24 Willie McCovey Juan Marichal 1,657,192
1967 91 71 .562 10.5 2 .245 652 140 22 2.92 Jim Ray Hart Gaylord Perry 1,242,480
1968 88 74 .543 9 2 .239 599 108 50 2.71 Willie McCovey Gaylord Perry 837,220
1969 90 72 .556 3 2 .242 713 136 71 3.26 Willie McCovey Juan Marichal 873,603
1970 86 76 .531 16 3 .262 831 165 83 4.50 Willie McCovey Gaylord Perry 740,720
1971 90 72 .556 --- w 1 .247 706 140 101 3.32 Bobby Bonds Juan Marichal 1,106,043
1972 69 86 .445 26.5 5 .244 662 150 123 3.69 Bobby Bonds Ron Bryant 647,744
1973 88 74 .543 11 3 .262 739 161 112 3.79 Bobby Bonds Ron Bryant 834,193
1974 72 90 .444 30 5 .252 634 93 107 3.78 Bobby Bonds Jim Barr 519,987
1975 80 81 .497 27.5 3 .259 659 84 99 3.74 Bobby Murcer John Montefusco 522,919
1976 74 88 .457 28 4 .246 595 85 88 3.53 Gary Matthews Jim Barr 626,868
1977 75 87 .463 23 4 .253 673 134 90 3.75 Willie McCovey Ed Halicki 700,056
1978 89 73 .549 6 3 .248 613 117 87 3.30 Jack Clark Bob Knepper 1,740,477
1979 71 91 .438 19.5 4 .246 672 125 140 4.16 Jack Clark Gary Lavelle 1,456,402
1980 75 86 .466 17 5 .244 573 80 100 3.46 Jack Clark Vida Blue 1,096,115

“The only difference between Candlestick and San Quentin is that at Candlestick, they let you go home at night.”
—Giants outfielder Jim Wohlford on Candlestick Park


1981 56 55 .505 11 5/3 .250 427 63 89 3.28 Jack Clark Vida Blue 632,274
1982 87 75 .537 2 3 .253 673 133 130 3.64 Jack Clark Greg Minton 1,200,948
1983 79 83 .488 12 5 .247 687 142 140 3.70 Darrell Evans Atlee Hammaker 1,251,530
1984 66 96 .407 26 6 .265 682 112 126 4.39 Chili Davis Gary Lavelle 1,001,545
1985 62 100 .383 33 6 .233 556 115 99 3.61 Chili Davis Scott Garrelts 818,697
1986 83 79 .512 13 3 .253 698 114 148 3.33 Chili Davis Mike Krukow 1,528,748
1987 90 72 .556 --- w 1 .260 783 205 126 3.68 Will Clark Kelly Downs 1,917,168
1988 83 79 .512 11.5 4 .248 670 113 121 3.39 Will Clark Rick Reuschel 1,785,297
1989 92 70 .568 --- #w 1 .250 699 141 87 3.30 Kevin Mitchell Scott Garrelts 2,059,701
1990 85 77 .525 6 3 .262 719 152 109 4.08 Brett Butler John Burkett 1,975,528
1991 75 87 .463 19 4 .246 649 141 95 4.03 Will Clark Trevor Wilson 1,737,478
1992 72 90 .444 26 5 .244 574 105 112 3.61 Will Clark Bill Swift 1,560,998
1993 103 59 .636 1 2 .276 808 168 120 3.61 Barry Bonds Bill Swift 2,606,354
1994 55 60 .478 3.5 2 .249 504 123 114 3.99 Barry Bonds Rod Beck 1,704,608
1995 67 77 .465 11 4 .253 652 152 138 4.86 Barry Bonds Mark Leiter 1,241,500
1996 68 94 .420 23 4 .253 752 153 113 4.71 Barry Bonds Mark Gardner 1,413,922
1997 90 72 .556 --- w 1 .258 784 172 121 4.39 Barry Bonds Shawn Estes 1,690,869
1998 89 74 .546 9.5 2 .274 845 161 102 4.18 Barry Bonds Robb Nen 1,925,364
1999 86 76 .531 14 2 .271 872 188 109 4.71 Jeff Kent Russ Ortiz 2,078,399
2000 97 65 .599 --- w 1 .278 925 226 79 4.21 Barry Bonds Robb Nen 3,318,800
2001 90 72 .556 2 2 .266 799 235 57 4.18 Barry Bonds Russ Ortiz 3,311,958
2002 95 66 .590 2.5 ! #2 .267 783 198 74 3.54 Barry Bonds Robb Nen 3,253,203
2003 100 60 .625 --- w 1 .264 755 180 53 3.73 Barry Bonds Jason Schmidt 3,264,898
2004 91 71 .562 2 2 .270 850 183 43 4.29 Barry Bonds Jason Schmidt 3,256,854
2005 75 87 .463 7 3 .261 649 128 71 4.33 Moises Alou Noah Lowry 3,181,023
2006 76 85 .472 11.5 3 .259 746 163 58 4.63 Ray Durham Jason Schmidt 3,130,313
2007 71 91 .438 19 5 .254 683 131 119 4.19 Randy Winn Matt Cain 3,223,215
2008 72 90 .444 12 4 .262 640 94 108 4.38 Randy Winn Tim Lincecum 2,863,837
2009 88 74 .543 7 3 .257 657 122 78 3.55 Pablo Sandoval Tim Lincecum 2,863,110
2010 92 70 .568 --- #*w 1 .257 697 162 55 3.36 Aubrey Huff Brian Wilson 3,037,443
2011 86 76 .531 8 2 .242 570 121 85 3.20 Pablo Sandoval Matt Cain 3,387,303
2012 94 68 .580 --- #*w 1 .269 718 103 118 3.68 Buster Posey Matt Cain 3,377,371
2013 76 86 .469 16 T-3 .260 629 107 67 4.00 Hunter Pence Madison Bumgarner 3,326,796
2014 88 74 .543 6 #* ! 2 .255 665 132 56 3.50 Hunter Pence Madison Bumgarner 3,368,697
2015 84 78 .519 8 2 .267 696 136 93 3.72 Buster Posey Madison Bumgarner 3,375,882
2016 87 75 .537 4 ! 2 .258 715 130 79 3.65 Brandon Belt Johnny Cueto 3,365,256

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Highlights of the Giants' History on This Great Game:

1904 baseball history1904: McGraw v. Johnson The World Series becomes a casualty of a continued feud between two of the games's most powerful men.


1905 baseball history1905: The Zero Heroes The Giants' Christy Mathewson and Joe McGinnity completely deny the Philadelphia Athletics in the World Series.


1908 baseball history1908: The Merkle Boner A 19-year-old rookie costs the Giants by committing one of the game's most notorious blunders.


1913 baseball history1913: Giant Bridesmaids, Again Not even good luck charm Charlie Faust can save the Giants from another World Series defeat.


1921 baseball history1921: See You at the Polo Grounds The home for both the New York Yankees and Giants becomes the exclusive host to the first Subway Series.


1933 baseball history1933: Making Little Napoleon Proud An ailing John McGraw hands the managerial reins to first baseman Bill Terry—who promptly rides the Giants back to triumph.


1951 baseball history1951: The Shot Heard 'Round the World Bobby Thomson's historic home run caps one of baseball's greatest pennant races for the Giants.


1954 baseball history1954: At Least They Stopped the Yanks The Cleveland Indians go into juggernaut mode and upend the perennial AL favorite Yankees with 111 wins—but their momentum is stopped cold by the Giants in October.


1958 baseball history1958: And Now, From Coast to Coast The Giants and Dodgers break the hearts of New Yorkers everywhere and head west to California.


1962 baseball history1962: Lined to Second Best After an exhilirating pennant race, the Giants lose a seven-game World Series when Willie McCovey's potential series-winning hit is snared out of the air by Yankee second baseman Bobby Richardson.


1989 baseball history1989: Of Triumph and Tragedy The Giants figure prominently in a rough year for the game, with Dave Dravecky's triumphant comeback bid stopped cold and a World Series date with the cross-bay Oakland A's shaken up by a major earthquake before Game Three.


2002 baseball history2002: The Wild, Wild Card West The red-hot Anaheim Angels—riding high on the back of their Rally Monkey—attempt to overcome Barry Bonds and the Giants.


2007 baseball history2007: Bow if You Will, Spit if You Wish Barry Bonds breaks Hank Aaron's fabled career home run mark, but few people are happy about it.


2010 baseball history2010: Joy and Torture Combining excellent pitching and edge-of-your-seat thrills, the San Francisco Giants finally win it all.


2012 baseball history2012: A Giant October Surprise The San Francisco Giants make it two world titles in three years after surviving a season full of injuries, challenges and handicaps.


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The Giants by the Decade


19th Century Created from the ashes of two failed National League teams, the Giants were initially set up in 1883 as part of two-team startup by John B. Day and Jim Mutrie, who also put together a team in the inferior American Association and had both play at adjacent fields. The AA team would fold after four seasons, while the Giants—named as such after owner-manager Mutrie excitedly referred to his players as “My Giants”—created a strong foothold with consecutive pennants in 1888-89 behind 19th Century slugger Roger Connor (baseball’s all-time home run leader until Babe Ruth) and workhorse pitching from Mickey Welch and Tim Keefe. Under financial duress, the Giants were sold in 1895 to Tammany Hall bigwig Andrew Friedman—and under his detestable rule, the team descended into an ongoing soap opera worthy of George Steinbrenner, minus the championship glory.


1900s After attempting to sabotage the American League’s Baltimore Orioles, fiery, diminutive manager John McGraw partnered with former Cincinnati owner John Brush to rescue the Giants from Freedman in 1902. Almost overnight, the team improved into a scrappy perennial contender led by the incomparable pitching duo of Christy Mathewson and Joe McGinnity, who efficiently ate up both innings and opponents. Their combined talents hit a high note at the 1905 World Series when they pitched 44 of 45 innings in a five-game triumph over the Philadelphia A’s—and didn’t allow a single earned run.


1910s The Giants remained the National League’s marquee franchise, winning four pennants—but losing each time at the World Series, often in disheartening fashion. McGinnity was gone and Mathewson was fading, but McGraw replenished his corps with one solid roster after another that featured no superstars—and no weaknesses. Support for the team remained loyal at the Polo Grounds, which burned to the ground shortly after the start to the 1911 season—to be quickly replaced by a steel-and-concrete version of the stadium that would last into the 1960s.


1920s Fueled with an infusion of potent, highly talented hitters led by Ross Youngs, Frankie Frisch and George Kelly, the Giants dominated the early portion of the decade with four straight NL flags—winning two “Subway Series” in 1921-22 over the local rival Yankees, whom McGraw came to abhor with a touch of jealousy towards star bopper Babe Ruth. The Giants remained competitive in late decade but failed to reach the top despite brief stints from star sluggers Hack Wilson and Rogers Hornsby.


1930s Aging and losing energy, McGraw stepped down in 1932 and gave the managerial reins to Bill Terry, the last NL player to hit .400 in 1930—the same year the Giants set an all-time mark with a .319 team average. As manager, Terry retained the winning ethic, taking three NL pennants over a five-year period and a world title in his first full year, over Washington in 1933. On the field, the Giants were unquestionably led by screwball ace Carl Hubbell and slugger Mel Ott, who led the Giants in home runs every year between 1928-45.


1940s Like most teams during World War II, the Giants’ fortunes were dictated by what talent was available as many players went into military service; per example, the third-place showing of the 1942 team was followed up by 98 losses one season later. The immediate postwar years brought stability back to the Polo Grounds, but not much triumph as the Giants experienced their first pennantless decade of the century. Ott finished his career as the first NL player with 500 home runs, and the 1947 Giants became the first major league team to bash 200.


1950s Dynamic new talent led by peerless outfielder Willie Mays gave the Giants an early-decade resurgence and two NL titles, both highlighted by legendary moments: Bobby Thomson’s “Shot Heard ‘Round the World” homer than capped an unlikely late-season comeback over Brooklyn in 1951, and Mays’ over-the-shoulder catch in the team’s sweep of Cleveland in the 1954 World Series. But the neighborhood alarmingly decayed around the aging Polo Grounds and owner Horace Stoneham wanted out; following the lead of the Dodgers, he moved the Giants to California, setting up shop in San Francisco starting in 1958.


1960s With Mays at peak form, the emergence of numerous young, future Hall of Famers (Willie McCovey, Orlando Cepeda, Juan Marichal and Gaylord Perry) and the opening of modern (but often Arctic) Candlestick Park, the Giants looked set for a fabulous decade—yet they found themselves frequently logging second- and third-place finishes, winning the NL only once in 1962 after ousting the Dodgers in a three-game playoff, as they did in 1951; they fell short to the Yankees in a heartbreaking seven-game World Series.


1970s The Giants’ aging stars were traded or released in a series of horrendous moves that signaled the beginning of the end of the Stoneham era; local competition from the flashy, champion A’s in Oakland and a multi-purpose expansion of Candlestick (which briefly included a rock-hard artificial surface) only made matters worse, as attendance shrank to next to nothing. Bob Lurie purchased the Giants in 1977 and saved the franchise from a move out of town; under his early watch, real grass and bigger crowds (if not success on the field) returned to Candlestick as the team began spending money again.


1980s After a shaky start to the decade, the Giants hit onto a long-overdue period of sustained winning when manager Roger Craig took the reins and taught his core of youthful talent (led by brash slugger Will Clark) to embrace Candlestick’s chilly environment. The results were infectious; the Giants came within one game of a NL pennant in 1987 and then conquered the circuit in 1989, before being flattened by the A’s in a ‘Bay Bridge’ Series painfully overshadowed by a 6.9 earthquake before Game Three that nearly cancelled the whole event.


1990s Fed up with Candlestick and unable to get a new ballpark built locally, Lurie sold the Giants to St. Petersburg investors who planned to move the team to Florida—but baseball nixed the deal in favor of a less expensive offer fronted by Peter Magowan, who kept the team in San Francisco, embraced the team’s storied past and brought in Barry Bonds, who continually improved and tightened his grip on the title of the game’s greatest active player. Under Magowan and Bonds, the Giants won 103 games in 1993 but, a year before the advent of the wild card, lost a shot at the playoffs by one game, before securing a NL West title in 1997.


2000s The new century began with the Giants moving from one of the game’s most reviled ballparks to one of the most beautiful at Pac Bell (now AT&T) Park, located closer to downtown and complete with bay waters behind right field. Reaching into his late 30s, Bonds was expected to decline—but instead evolved from superstar to superhuman, breaking season and career home run records with startling ease (while nearly giving the Giants a championship in 2002); it was later revealed that his late career spurt was the result of steroid use. Bonds’ departure in 2007 set the tone for a wholly different Giant team structure focused on rock solid pitching.


2010s The call-to-arms philosophy paid off in 2010 as rotation stars Tim Lincecum, Matt Cain and rookie Madison Bumgarner delivered the franchise’s first world title since moving to San Francisco 52 years earlier; they won another just two seasons years later with help at the plate from MVP catcher Buster Posey, and two more years after that did it once more with an astonishing postseason effort from the imposing Bumgarner. With this recent success matched by plentiful revenue, a sound front office and terrific community relations, the Giants maintain an enviable existence within baseball.


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