San Diego Padres


Ballparks of the Padres
San Diego Stadium/Jack Murphy Stadium/Qualcomm Stadium (1969-2003); Petco Park (2004-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates team record. * - World Series champion. # - National League champion. w - Western Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1969 52 110 .321 41 6 .225 468 99 45 4.24 Nate Colbert Joe Niekro 512,970
1970 63 99 .389 39 6 .246 681 172 60 4.36 Cito Gaston Danny Coombs 643,679
1971 61 100 .379 28.5 6 .233 486 96 70 3.22 Nate Colbert Dave Roberts 557,513
1972 58 95 .379 36.5 6 .227 488 102 78 3.78 Nate Colbert Clay Kirby 644,273
1973 60 102 .370 39 6 .244 548 112 88 4.16 Nate Colbert Bill Greif 611,826
1974 60 102 .370 42 6 .229 541 99 85 4.58 Dave Winfield Dave Freisleben 1,075,399
1975 71 91 .438 37 4 .244 552 78 85 3.48 Dave Winfield Randy Jones 1,281,747
1976 73 89 .451 29 5 .247 570 64 92 3.65 Dave Winfield Randy Jones 1,458,478
1977 69 93 .426 29 5 .249 692 120 133 4.43 Dave Winfield Rollie Fingers 1,376,259
1978 84 78 .519 11 4 .252 591 75 152 3.28 Dave Winfield Gaylord Perry 1,670,107
1979 68 93 .422 22 5 .242 603 93 100 3.69 Dave Winfield Gaylord Perry 1,456,967
1980 73 89 .451 19.5 6 .255 591 67 239 3.65 Gene Richards Rollie Fingers 1,139,026
1981 41 69 .474 26 6/6 .256 382 32 83 3.72 Gene Richards Gary Lucas 519,161
1982 81 81 .500 8 4 .257 675 81 165 3.52 Sixto Lezcano Tim Lollar 1,607,516
1983 81 81 .500 10 4 .250 653 93 179 3.62 Terry Kennedy Dave Dravecky 1,539,815
1984 92 70 .568 --- #w 1 .259 686 109 152 3.48 Tony Gwynn Mark Thurmond 1,983,904

“Instead of looking like the American flag, I look like a taco.”
—Former Dodger Steve Garvey, after signing with a Padres team that wore a fast-food color scheme of brown, orange and gold


1985 83 79 .512 12 T-3 .255 650 109 60 3.40 Tony Gwynn Dave Dravecky 2,210,352
1986 74 88 .457 22 4 .261 656 136 96 3.99 Kevin McReynolds Lance McCullers 1,805,716
1987 65 97 .401 25 6 .260 668 113 198 4.27 Tony Gwynn Lance McCullers 1,454,061
1988 83 78 .516 11 3 .247 594 94 123 3.28 Tony Gwynn Eric Show 1,506,896
1989 89 73 .549 3 2 .251 642 120 136 3.38 Jack Clark Bruce Hurst 2,009,031
1990 75 87 .463 16 T-4 .257 673 123 138 3.68 Bip Roberts Ed Whitson 1,856,396
1991 84 78 .519 10 3 .244 636 121 101 3.57 Fred McGriff Bruce Hurst 1,804,289
1992 82 80 .506 16 3 .255 617 135 69 3.56 Gary Sheffield Andy Benes 1,721,406
1993 61 101 .377 43 7 .252 679 153 92 4.23 Tony Gwynn Andy Benes 1,375,432
1994 47 70 .402 12.5 4 .275 479 92 79 4.08 Tony Gwynn Trevor Hoffman 953,857
1995 70 74 .486 8 3 .272 668 116 124 4.13 Tony Gwynn Joey Hamilton 1,041,805
1996 91 71 .562 --- w 1 .265 771 147 109 3.73 Ken Caminiti Trevor Hoffman 2,187,886
1997 76 86 .469 14 4 .271 795 152 140 4.99 Tony Gwynn Trevor Hoffman 2,089,333
1998 98 64 .605 --- #w 1 .253 749 167 79 3.63 Greg Vaughn Kevin Brown 2,555,874
1999 74 88 .457 26 4 .252 710 153 174 4.47 Reggie Sanders Trevor Hoffman 2,523,538
2000 76 86 .469 21 5 .254 752 157 131 4.52 Ryan Klesko Trevor Hoffman 2,352,443

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the San Diego Padres?
Tony Gwynn > Eight-time batting champ with over 3,000 hits; member of Padres’ two pennant winners
Trevor Hoffman > Consistently solid closer racked up 552 saves in 16 years at San Diego
Ray Kroc > McDonalds founder who saved moribund Padres from mid-1970s move to Washington and made them relevant
Dave Winfield > Lanky, powerful outfielder was Padres’ first superstar and gave team much-needed panache


2001 79 83 .488 13 4 .252 789 161 129 4.52 Phil Nevin Trevor Hoffman 2,378,128
2002 66 96 .407 32 5 .253 662 136 71 4.62 Ryan Klesko Trevor Hoffman 2,220,601
2003 64 98 .395 36.5 5 .261 678 128 76 4.87 Mark Loretta Jake Peavy 2,030,084
2004 87 75 .537 6 3 .273 768 139 52 4.03 Mark Loretta Jake Peavy 3,016,752
2005 82 80 .506 --- w 1 .257 684 130 99 4.13 Brian Giles Jake Peavy 2,869,787
2006 88 74 .543 --- w T-1 .263 731 161 123 3.87 Mike Cameron Clay Hensley 2,659,757
2007 89 74 .546 1.5 3 .251 741 171 55 3.70 Adrian Gonzalez Jake Peavy 2,790,074
2008 63 99 .389 21 5 .250 637 154 36 4.41 Adrian Gonzalez Jake Peavy 2,427,535
2009 75 87 .463 20 4 .242 638 141 82 4.37 Adrian Gonzalez Heath Bell 1,919,603
2010 90 72 .556 2 2 .246 665 132 124 3.39 Adrian Gonzalez Heath Bell 2,131,774
2011 71 91 .438 23 5 .237 593 91 170 3.42 Cameron Maybin Heath Bell 2,143,018
2012 76 86 .469 18 4 .247 651 121 155 4.01 Chase Headley Clayton Richard 2,123,721
2013 76 86 .469 16 T-3 .245 618 146 118 3.98 Will Venable Andrew Cashner 2,166,691
2014 77 85 .475 17 3 .226 535 109 91 3.27 Seth Smith Tyson Ross 2,195,373
2015 74 88 .457 18 4 .243 650 148 82 4.09 Justin Upton Craig Kimbrel 2,459,752

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the Padres' History on This Great Game:

1984 baseball history1984: The Roar of a Powerhouse The Padres win their first pennant behind a mix of sage veterans and rising talent, but hopes of winning it all come to a screeching halt against a dominant Detroit ballclub.


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Bushers Book

The Padres by the Decade


1960s With a brand new multi-purpose stadium seating 50,000, unbeatable weather and a rich minor league baseball heritage, the City of San Diego was rewarded with one of two National League franchises for 1969. Many locals, already fans of the Dodgers 100 miles to the north, were cool to immediately embrace the newborn Padres, who drew just 23,000 in their first home game and 600,000 for the year; a major league-worst 110 losses didn’t help.


1970s Success and, therefore, respect were both hard to come by as the Padres struggled to achieve solid footing; by 1974, it looked as if the San Diego experiment had come to an end with an all-but-certain move to Washington—but McDonalds founder Ray Kroc rescued the Padres, kept them local and fueled far more money in an attempt to shake them from the cellar. The fans responded—the team finally cracked a million at the gate—and the team slowly followed suit, finally reaching over .500 for the first time in 1978. Stars were born with tall and talented slugger Dave Winfield and junkball specialist Randy Jones, who twice won 20 games.


1980s The Padres finally hit paydirt on the field in 1984 with their first postseason appearance—and copped their first pennant by upsetting the favored Chicago Cubs in the NLCS before being steamrolled by the powerful Detroit Tigers in the World Series. From there, the Padres spent the rest of the decade scuffling in the standings with various degrees of success but no further postseason action—despite the emergence of perennial batting champ Tony Gwynn, who would become the most popular player to wear a Padre uniform.


1990s A rocky start to the decade hit its low point in 1993 when young owner Tom Werner, who bought the team in 1990, initiated a housecleaning of star players so brazen that season ticket holders threatened to sue. John Moores took over ownership and resumed sensible spending—and in 1998 the Padres responded with a franchise-record 98 wins and their second pennant; but as with 1984, the dream hit a dead end in the World Series against another titanic opponent (the 114-48 Yankees). Bittersweet accomplishments included Gwynn’s 1994 run to hit .400 (cut short at .394 by the players’ strike) and Ken Caminiti’s 1996 MVP effort—which he later confessed to achieving while on steroids.


2000s The Padres received a boost in 2004 with the opening of gorgeous Petco Park in downtown San Diego, as the team won consecutive NL West crowns from 2005-06 behind ace pitcher Jake Peavy and popular veteran closer Trevor Hoffman. But the new yard quickly earned a reputation as a pitching haven that was death on hitting, as 1-0 and 2-1 games became a constant sight and scared potential free agent sluggers away—citing the quasi-herculean numbers of Adrian Gonzalez, the Padres’ lone bona fide star who did the majority of his damage on the road.


2010s Gonzalez left in a trade with Boston after telling the Padres he wouldn’t re-up for the long term; in his absence, the Padres have struggled to find a worthy replacement and embarked on a subpar period in which a blasé roster has failed to generate much enthusiasm. Potential box score equilibrium has returned with the moving in of Petco’s fences for 2013, but it has yet to move the Padres any closer to increased success.