Pittsburgh Pirates

Known as the Pittsburgh Alleghenys, 1882-90


Ballparks of the Pirates
Exposition Park (1882-84, 1891-1909); Forbes Field (1909-70); Three Rivers Stadium (1970-2000); PNC Park (2001-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates team record. * - World Series champion. # - National League champion. e - Eastern Division champion. c - Central Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1882 39 39 .500 15 4 .251 428 18   2.79 Ed Swartwood Denny Driscoll  
1883 31 67 .316 635 7 .257 525 13   4.62 Ed Swartwood Denny Driscoll  
1884 30 78 .278 45.5 11 .211 406 2   4.35 Ed Swartwood Jack Neagle  
1885 56 55 .505 22.5 3 .240 547 5   2.92 Tom Brown Ed Morris  
1886 80 57 .584 12 2 .241 810 16 260 2.83 Fred Carroll Ed Morris  
1887 55 69 .444 24 6 .258 621 20 221 4.12 Fred Carroll Pud Galvin  
1888 66 68 .493 19.5 6 .227 534 14 287 2.67 Bill Keuhne Ed Morris  
1889 61 71 .462 25 5 .253 726 42 231 4.51 Fred Carroll Harry Staley  
1890 23 113 .169 66.5 8 .230 597 20 208 5.97 Doggie Miller Bill Sowders  
1891 55 80 .407 30.5 T-7 .239 679 29 205 2.89 Jake Beckley Mark Baldwin  
1892 80 73 .523 23.5 6 .236 802 38 222 3.10 Jake Beckley Adonis Terry  
1893 81 48 .628 5 2 .299 970 37 210 4.08 Mike Smith Frank Killen  
1894 65 65 .500 25 7 .312 955 48 256 5.60 Jake Stenzel Frank Killen  
1895 71 61 .538 17 7 .290 811 26 257 4.05 Jake Stenzel Pink Hawley  
1896 66 63 .512 24 6 .292 787 27 217 4.30 Mike Smith Frank Killen  
1897 60 71 .458 32.5 8 .276 676 25 170 4.67 Mike Smith Frank Killen  
1898 72 76 .486 29.5 8 .258 634 14 107 3.41 Patsy Donovan Jesse Tannehill  
1899 76 73 .510 25.5 7 .289 834 27 179 3.60 Jimmy Williams Jesse Tannehill  

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the Pittsburgh Pirates?
Roberto Clemente > Quiet, taciturn yet near-mythical star who collected four batting titles, 3,000 hits and endless outfield assists
Bill Mazeroski > Brilliantly adept at second base, but forever known for hitting homer that won 1960 World Series
Willie Stargell > Confident slugger, franchise home run leader and father figure (“Pops”) who willed 1979 Pirates to world title
Honus Wagner > Ultra-dominant offensive force from Pirates’ impressive run of deadball era success


1900 79 60 .568 4.5 2 .272 733 26 174 3.06 Honus Wagner Jesse Tannehill 264,000
1901 90 49 .647 --- #1 .286 776 29 203 2.58 Honus Wagner Deacon Phillippe 251,955
1902 103 36 .741 --- #1 .286 775 18 222 2.30 Honus Wagner Jesse Tannehill 243,826
1903 91 49 .650 --- #1 .286 793 34 172 2.91 Honus Wagner Sam Leever 326,855
1904 87 66 .569 19 4 .258 675 15 178 2.89 Honus Wagner Sam Leever 340,615
1905 96 57 .627 9 2 .266 692 22 202 2.86 Honus Wagner Deacon Phillippe 369,124
1906 93 60 .608 23.5 3 .261 623 12 162 2.21 Honus Wagner Vic Willis 394,877
1907 91 63 .591 17 2 .254 634 19 264 2.30 Honus Wagner Vic Willis 319,506
1908 98 56 .636 1 T-2 .257 585 25 186 2.12 Honus Wagner Vic Willis 382,444
1909 110 42 .724 --- #*1 .260 699 25 185 2.07 Honus Wagner Howie Camnitz 534,950
1910 86 67 .562 17.5 3 .266 655 33 148 2.83 Honus Wagner Babe Adams 436,586
1911 85 69 .552 14.5 3 .262 744 49 160 2.84 Honus Wagner Babe Adams 432,000
1912 93 58 .616 10 2 .284 751 39 177 2.85 Honus Wagner Claude Hendrix 384,000
1913 78 71 .523 21.5 4 .263 673 35 181 2.90 Jim Viox Babe Adams 296,000
1914 69 85 .448 25.5 7 .233 503 18 147 2.70 Max Carey Babe Adams 139,620
1915 73 81 .474 18 5 .246 557 24 182 2.60 Bill Hinchman Al Mamaux 225,743
1916 65 89 .422 29 6 .240 484 20 173 2.76 Bill Hinchman Wilbur Cooper 289,132
1917 51 103 .331 47 8 .238 464 9 150 3.01 Max Carey Wilbur Cooper 192,807
1918 65 60 .520 17 4 .248 466 15 200 2.48 Max Carey Wilbur Cooper 213,610
1919 71 68 .511 24. 4 .249 472 17 196 2.88 Billy Southworth Babe Adams 276,810
1920 79 75 .513 14 4 .257 530 16 181 2.89 Max Carey Babe Adams 429,037
1921 90 63 .588 4 2 .285 692 37 134 3.17 Max Carey Whitney Glazer 701,567
1922 85 69 .552 8 T-3 .308 865 52 145 3.98 Max Carey Wilbur Cooper 523,675
1923 87 67 .565 8.5 3 .295 786 49 154 3.87 Pie Traynor Johnny Morrison 611,082
1924 90 63 .588 3 3 .287 724 44 181 3.27 Kiki Cuyler Ray Kremer 736,883
1925 95 58 .621 --- #*1 .307 912 78 159 3.87 Kiki Cuyler Lee Meadows 804,354
1926 84 69 .549 4.5 3 .285 769 44 91 3.67 Paul Waner Ray Kremer 798,542
1927 94 60 .610 --- #1 .305 817 54 65 3.66 Paul Waner Ray Kremer 869,720
1928 85 67 .559 9 4 .309 837 52 64 3.95 Paul Waner Burleigh Grimes 495,070
1929 88 65 .575 10.5 2 .303 904 60 94 4.36 Paul Waner Burleigh Grimes 491,377
1930 80 74 .519 12 5 .303 891 86 76 5.24 Adam Comorsoky Larry French 357,795
1931 75 79 .487 26 5 .266 636 41 59 3.66 Paul Waner Heinie Meine 260,392
1932 86 68 .558 4 2 .285 701 48 71 3.75 Paul Waner Larry French 287,262
1933 87 67 .565 5 2 .285 667 39 34 3.27 Arky Vaughan Larry French 288,747
1934 74 76 .493 19.5 5 .287 735 52 44 4.20 Paul Waner Waite Hoyt 322,622
1935 86 67 .562 13.5 4 .285 743 66 30 3.42 Arky Vaughan Cy Blanton 352,855
1936 84 70 .545 8 4 .286 804 60 37 3.89 Paul Waner Red Lucas 372,524
1937 86 68 .558 10 3 .285 704 47 32 3.56 Paul Waner Russ Bauers 459,679
1938 86 64 .573 2 2 .279 707 65 47 3.46 Johnny Rizzo Russ Bauers 641,033
1939 68 85 .444 28.5 6 .276 666 63 44 4.15 Arky Vaughan Mace Brown 376,734
1940 78 76 .506 22.5 4 .276 809 76 69 4.36 Arky Vaughan Rip Sewell 507,934

Bushers Book
1941 81 73 .526 19 4 .268 690 56 59 3.48 Elbie Fletcher Max Butcher 482,241
1942 66 81 .449 36.5 5 .245 585 54 41 3.58 Elbie Fletcher Rip Sewell 448,897
1943 80 74 .519 25 4 .262 669 42 64 3.08 Bob Elliott Rip Sewell 498,740
1944 90 63 .588 14.5 2 .265 744 70 87 3.44 Bob Elliott Rip Sewell 604,278
1945 82 72 .532 16 4 .267 753 72 81 3.76 Johnny Barrett Preacher Roe 604,694
1946 63 91 .409 34 7 .250 552 60 48 3.72 Elbie Fletcher Fritz Ostermueller 749,962
1947 62 92 .403 32 T-7 .261 745 156 30 4.68 Ralph Kiner Fritz Ostermueller 1,283,531
1948 83 71 .539 8.5 4 .263 706 108 68 4.15 Ralph Kiner Vic Lombardi 1,517,021
1949 71 83 .461 26 6 .259 681 126 48 4.57 Ralph Kiner Murry Dickson 1,449,435
1950 57 96 .373 33.5 8 .264 681 138 43 4.96 Ralph Kiner Murry Dickson 1,166,267
1951 64 90 .416 32.5 7 .258 689 137 29 4.79 Ralph Kiner Murry Dickson 980,590
1952 42 112 .273 54.5 8 .231 515 92 43 4.65 Ralph Kiner Murry Dickson 686,673
1953 50 104 .325 55 8 .247 622 99 41 5.22 Frank Thomas Murry Dickson 572,757
1954 53 101 .344 44 8 .248 557 76 21 4.92 Frank Thomas Dick Littlefield 475,494
1955 60 94 .390 38.5 8 .244 560 91 22 4.39 Dale Long Bob Friend 469,397
1956 66 88 .429 27 7 .257 588 110 24 3.74 Dale Long Bob Friend 949,878
1957 62 92 .403 33 T-7 .268 586 92 46 3.88 Frank Thomas Bob Friend 850,732
1958 84 70 .545 8 2 .264 662 134 30 3.56 Bob Skinner Bob Friend 1,311,988
1959 78 76 .506 9 4 .263 651 112 32 3.90 Bob Skinner Vern Law 1,359,917
1960 95 59 .607 --- #*1 .276 734 120 34 3.49 Don Hoak Bob Friend 1,705,828
1961 75 79 .487 18 6 .273 694 128 26 3.92 Dick Stuart Joe Gibbon 1,199,128
1962 83 68 .578 8 4 .268 706 108 50 3.37 Bob Skinner Bob Friend 1,090,648
1963 74 88 .457 25 8 .250 567 108 57 3.10 Roberto Clemente Bob Friend 783,648
1964 80 82 .494 13 T-6 .264 663 121 39 3.52 Roberto Clemente Bob Veale 759,496
1965 90 72 .556 7 3 .265 675 111 51 3.01 Willie Stargell Vern Law 909,279
1966 92 70 .568 3 3 .279 759 158 64 3.52 Roberto Clemente Bob Veale 1,196,618
1967 81 81 .500 20.5 6 .277 679 91 79 3.74 Roberto Clemente Tommie Sisk 907,012
1968 80 82 .494 17 6 .252 583 80 130 2.74 Roberto Clemente Steve Blass 693,485
1969 88 74 .543 12 3 .277 725 119 74 3.61 Willie Stargell Bob Moose 769,369

“Most of what I knew about style I learned from Roberto Clemente.”
—John Sayles, writer-director


1970 89 73 .549 --- e 1 .270 729 130 66 3.70 Willie Stargell Luke Walker 1,341,947
1971 97 65 .599 --- #*e 1 .274 788 154 65 3.31 Willie Stargell Steve Blass 1,501,132
1972 96 59 .619 --- e 1 .274 691 110 49 2.81 Willie Stargell Steve Blass 1,427,460
1973 80 82 .494 2.5 3 .261 704 154 23 3.73 Willie Stargell Dock Ellis 1,319,913
1974 88 74 .543 --- e 1 .274 751 114 55 3.49 Willie Stargell Jim Rooker 1,110,552
1975 92 69 .571 --- e 1 .263 712 138 49 3.01 Dave Parker Jerry Reuss 1,270,018
1976 92 70 .568 9 2 .267 708 110 130 3.36 Dave Parker John Candelaria 1,025,945
1977 96 66 .593 5 2 .274 734 133 260 3.61 Bill Robinson John Candelaria 1,237,349
1978 88 73 .547 1.5 2 .257 684 115 213 3.41 Dave Parker Kent Tekulve 964,106
1979 98 64 .605 --- #*e 1 .272 775 148 180 3.41 Dave Parker Kent Tekulve 1,435,454
1980 83 79 .512 8 3 .266 666 116 209 3.58 Mike Easler Jim Bibby 1,646,757
1981 46 56 .451 13 4/6 .257 407 55 122 3.56 Bill Madlock Eddie Solomon 541,789
1982 84 78 .519 8 4 .273 724 134 161 3.81 Jason Thompson John Candelaria 1,024,106
1983 84 78 .519 6 2 .264 659 121 124 3.55 Bill Madlock John Candelaria 1,225,916
1984 75 87 .463 21.5 6 .255 615 98 96 3.11 Lee Lacy Rick Rhoden 773,500
1985 57 104 .354 43.5 6 .247 568 80 110 3.97 Johnny Ray Rick Reuschel 735,900
1986 64 98 .395 44 6 .250 663 111 152 3.90 Jim Morrison Rick Rhoden 1,000,917
1987 80 82 .494 15 T-4 .264 723 131 140 4.20 Andy Van Slyke Mike Dunne 1,161,193
1988 85 75 .531 15 2 .247 651 110 119 3.47 Andy Van Slyke Doug Drabek 1,866,713
1989 74 88 .457 19 5 .241 637 95 155 3.64 Bobby Bonilla Doug Drabek 1,374,141
1990 95 67 .586 --- e 1 .258 733 138 137 3.40 Barry Bonds Doug Drabek 2,049,908
1991 98 64 .605 --- e 1 .263 768 126 124 3.44 Barry Bonds Zane Smith 2,065,302
1992 96 66 .593 --- e 1 .255 693 106 110 3.35 Barry Bonds Doug Drabek 1,829,395
1993 75 87 .463 22 5 .267 707 110 92 4.77 Jay Bell Steve Cooke 1,650,593
1994 53 61 .465 13 T-3 .259 466 80 53 4.64 Jay Bell Zane Smith 1,222,520
1995 58 86 .403 27 5 .259 629 125 84 4.70 Orlando Merced Denny Neagle 905,517
1996 73 89 .451 15 5 .266 776 138 126 4.64 Jeff King Denny Neagle 1,332,150
1997 79 83 .488 5 2 .262 725 129 160 4.28 Tony Womack Francisco Cordova 1,657,022
1998 69 93 .426 33 6 .254 650 107 159 3.91 Jason Kendall Francisco Cordova 1,560,950
1999 78 83 .484 18.5 3 .259 775 171 112 4.33 Brian Giles Todd Ritchie 1,638,023
2000 69 93 .426 26 5 .267 793 168 86 4.93 Brian Giles Kris Benson 1,748,908
2001 62 100 .383 31 6 .257 657 161 93 5.05 Brian Giles Mike Williams 2,464,870
2002 72 89 .447 24.5 4 .244 641 142 86 4.23 Brian Giles Mike Williams 1,784,988
2003 75 87 .463 13 4 .267 753 163 86 4.64 Jason Kendall Kip Wells 1,636,751
2004 72 89 .447 32.5 5 .260 680 142 63 4.29 Craig Wilson Jose Mesa 1,580,031
2005 67 95 .414 33 6 .259 680 139 73 4.42 Jason Bay Zach Duke 1,817,245
2006 67 95 .414 16.5 5 .263 691 141 68 4.52 Jason Bay Mike Gonzalez 1,861,549
2007 68 94 .420 17 6 .263 724 148 68 4.93 Adam LaRoche Tom Gorzelanny 1,749,142
2008 67 95 .414 30.5 6 .258 735 153 57 5.08 Nate McLouth Paul Maholm 1,609,076
2009 62 99 .385 28.5 6 .252 636 125 90 4.59 Andrew McCutchen Zach Duke 1,577,853
2010 57 105 .352 34 6 .242 587 126 87 5.00 Andrew McCutchen Evan Meek 1,613,399
2011 72 90 .444 24 4 .244 610 107 108 4.04 Andrew McCutchen Joel Hanrahan 1,940,429
2012 79 83 .488 18 4 .243 651 170 73 3.86 Andrew McCutchen A.J. Burnett 2,091,918
2013 94 68 .580 3 ! 2 .245 634 161 94 3.26 Andrew McCutchen Francisco Liriano 2,256,862
2014 88 74 .543 2 ! 2 .259 682 156 104 3.47 Andrew McCutchen Edinson Volquez 2,442,564
2015 98 64 .605 2 ! 2 .260 697 140 98 3.21 Andrew McCutchen Gerrit Cole 2,498,596
2016 78 83 .484 25 3 .257 729 153 110 4.21 Starling Marte Edinson Volquez 2,249,201

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the Pirates' History on This Great Game:

1903 baseball history1903: The First World Series The Pirates participate in the first "world's championship" between the winners of the National and American Leagues after the two circuits agree to peacefully co-exist.


1909 baseball history1909: Three-Beat Sudden ace Babe Adams of the Pirates stifles the Detroit Tigers into their third straight World Series loss.


1925 baseball history1925: An Intestinal Excess The Washington Senators sneak by the New York Yankees, weakened by an ill Babe Ruth for a good chunk of the year—and run into the Pirates at World Series time.


1960 baseball history1960: A-Maz-ing! The Pirates become one of the game's unlikeliest champions with a historic walk-off home run by Bill Mazeroski.


1971 baseball history1971: Dynasty on the Rise Led by a gracefully aging Roberto Clemente, the Pirates lose three of their first four World Series games against Baltimore before putting on a championship comeback.


1979 baseball history1979: One for Pops and His Family After years of injury and career decline, Willie Stargell comes alive at 39 to lift the Pirates.


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The Pirates by the Decade


19th Century An original member of the American Association (born in 1882), the “Alleghenys” started slow, gained strength and became the first AA team to move to the superior National League in 1887; they fared okay until a disastrous 1890 when defections to the short-lived Players League resulted in a 23-113 record. The team quickly rebounded by pilfering players from here, there and everywhere—thus earning the name “Pirates”—but it rarely contended throughout the rest of the decade; not even Connie Mack, in an early managerial stint before his half-century of leadership with the A’s, could budge the Bucs out of the second division.


1900s Profiting from a mass migration of players (including Honus Wagner, pitcher Deacon Phillippe and player-manager Fred Clarke) from the defunct Louisville Colonels after 1899, the Pirates enjoyed their most sustained run of success in franchise history, winning four National League pennants and, in 1909, their first world title. Wagner was the team’s unquestioned hitting star and a juggernaut presence in the NL, dominating almost every aspect of offense throughout the decade.


1910s Playing in the palatial Forbes Field (opened in 1909), the Pirates began to fade as the stars of the 1900s aged and the roster turnover yielded a weaker lot, despite the emergence of speedy Max Carey (the most effective stolen base artist of his time) and tenacious pitcher Babe Adams; the nadir was reached in 1917 with 103 losses before a rebound began taking place. A singular sequence of history was achieved in 1912 when the Bucs hit a major league-record 126 triples—with Chief Wilson contributing an all-time individual mark of 36.


1920s The Pirates returned to prominence as they constantly remained above the .500 mark, but numerous internal squabbles in mid-decade ruined any chance that the team could achieve a dynastic position in the NL. A bruising line-drive offense collectively hit over .300 five times—each everyday player on the 1925 team hit over .300 except Eddie Moore, who hit .298—and was led by great talents in Paul Waner, Kiki Cuyler and Pie Traynor. Pittsburgh won one World Series in 1925 with a thrilling seven-game classic against Washington, but two years later fell well short against the mighty 1927 New York Yankees.


1930s It was a decade of lost opportunity for the Pirates, who remained competitive but never took home a NL pennant, three times finishing within five games of first place; the one that hurt the most was a 1938 campaign in which the Bucs blew a 6.5-game lead at the end of August. Hitting remained the team’s strength, as Waner continued to pound away at doubles and triples while joined by equally gifted shortstop Arky Vaughan. The lack of a consistent, solid pitching rotation proved to be the team’s Achilles heel.


1940s The Pirates were hit-or-miss through the war years and hosted one of the decade’s more intriguing players in multiple 20-game winner Rip Sewell, who perfected a high-arcing “eephus” pitch that frustrated hitters and umpires alike. A postwar descent in the standings was made tolerable with the arrival of power hitter Ralph Kiner, who led or co-led the NL in home runs over each of his seven full years with the club while bringing in gate receipts for the team’s owners, which included Hollywood crooner Bing Crosby.


1950s Branch Rickey, coming off groundbreaking successes in St. Louis and Brooklyn, was brought in to rebuild the Pirates. The results were disastrous at first, with the Bucs losing 100-plus games over three straight years (1952-54)—but slowly, the seeds planted by Rickey would gradually sprout a strong future roster that included pitchers Bob Friend and Vern Law, slick-fielding second baseman Bill Mazeroski and outfielder Roberto Clemente, a Puerto Rican native with amazing potential that wouldn’t be realized until the 1960s.


1960s The decade began with a memorable bang as the young Pirates of the 1950s grew together, took the NL flag and shocked the favored Yankees with great clutch theatrics in the 1960 World Series, with Mazeroski’s walk-off Game Seven homer recalled as one of the game’s greatest moments. Through the rest of the decade, the Pirates continually challenged but never took another pennant, despite four batting titles from a fully evolved Clemente.


1970s Another run of winning seasons took hold as the Pirates suffered just one below-.500 finish (in 1973, the one year the NL East was ripe for the taking), upgrading to modern times with a move to multi-purpose, artificially turfed Three Rivers Stadium and a switch to ornate double-knit uniforms. Led by father figure Willie Stargell, thundering MVP-caliber slugger Dave Parker and a trusty if often no-name pitching staff, the Pirates won six divisional titles and won both of their trips to the World Series, each time coming from two games down to defeat Baltimore.


1980s The Pirates’ Mojo completely disintegrated by mid-decade from a drug scandal that rocked the club and led to a local trial in which six Pittsburgh residents (including Pirate clubhouse caterer Curtis Strong) were convicted of distributing cocaine to players. The case crashed the Bucs’ momentum on the field, bottoming out with 104 losses in 1985. From those ashes, the Pirates began a long but impressive journey back towards winning form behind no-nonsense manager Jim Leyland and a collection of promising new talent including outfielders Barry Bonds, Bobby Bonilla, Andy Van Slyke and pitcher Doug Drabek.


1990s Led by a surging Bonds (with MVPs in 1990 and 1992), the Pirates won three straight NL East titles to open the decade—but failed to advance to the World Series each time, suffering heartbreaking defeats in the NLCS. Afterward, the Pirate roster was depleted overnight—with many of its star players (including Bonds, who left for San Francisco) chasing the free agent market to richer pastures. What remained slumbered through the rest of the decade to diminishing returns both in the standings and at the box office as small-market—and small-minded—Pirate ownership did little to refresh.


2000s The Pirates insisted that a new ballpark was their only way to regain a competitive edge; they built it and the fans came, but the product remained lousy as the Bucs set a North American pro sports record for consecutive straight losing seasons despite one of the most beautiful venues in the country in PNC Park—and all that revenue that flowed to the Pirates’ coffers. The team feverishly attempted to build from within, relying on maturing prospects over shelling out big bucks for free agents.


2010s The depression continued until 2013 when—finally, after 20 losing seasons—the Pirates not only eclipsed .500 but made the postseason with a stellar campaign under manager Clint Hurdle. Forecasts of further winning appear promising with a talented roster fronted by potent MVP outfielder Andrew McCutchen, speedy Starling Marte and a rare Pirates ace in Gerrit Cole, but a string of losses in the newly formed Wild Card game have stunted any chance of a deeper postseason existence.