Philadelphia Phillies

Known as the Philadelphia Quakers, 1883-89


Ballparks of the Phillies
Recreation Park (1883-86); Philadelphia Baseball Grounds (1887-94); Baker Bowl (1895-1938); Shibe Park/Connie Mack Stadium (1938-70); Veterans Stadium (1971-2003); Citizens Bank Park (2004-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates modern era (1900 or later) team record. * - World Series champion. # - National League champion. e - Eastern Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1883 17 81 .173 46 8 .240 437 3   5.34 Emil Gross John Coleman  
1884 39 73 .348 45 6 .234 549 14   3.93 Jack Manning Bill Vinton  
1885 56 54 .509 30 3 .229 513 20   2.39 Joe Mulvey Charlie Ferguson  
1886 71 43 .623 14 4 .240 621 26 226 2.45 Jim Fogarty Charlie Ferguson  
1887 75 48 .610 3.5 2 .274 901 47 355 3.47 George Wood Dan Casey  
1888 69 61 .531 14.5 3 .225 535 16 246 2.38 Sid Farrar Charlie Buffinton  
1889 63 64 .496 20.5 4 .266 742 44 269 4.00 Sam Thompson Charlie Buffinton  
1890 78 54 .591 9.5 3 .269 823 23 335 3.32 Billy Hamilton Kid Gleason 148,366
1891 68 69 .496 18.5 4 .252 756 21 232 3.73 Billy Hamilton Kid Gleason 217,282
1892 87 66 .569 16.5 4 .262 860 50 216 2.93 Roger Connor Tim Keefe 193,731
1893 72 57 .558 14 4 .301 1,011 80 202 4.68 Ed Delahanty Gus Weyhing 293,019
1894 71 57 .555 18 4 .349 1,143 40 273 5.63 Sam Thompson Jack Taylor 352,773
1895 78 53 .595 9.5 3 .330 1,068 61 276 5.47 Sam Thompson Jack Taylor 474,971
1896 62 68 .477 28.5 8 .295 890 49 191 5.20 Ed Delahanty Al Orth 357,025
1897 55 77 .417 38 10 .293 752 83 163 4.60 Nap Lajoie George Wheeler 290,027
1898 78 71 .523 24 6 .280 823 33 182 3.72 Ed Delahanty Wiley Piatt 265,414
1899 94 58 .618 9 3 .301 916 31 212 3.47 Ed Delahanty Chick Fraser 388,933

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the Philadelphia Phillies?
Pete Alexander > Premier ace of 1910s NL was at his productive best with Phillies, winning 30-plus games three straight years
Steve Carlton > Bizarre as he was brilliant, “Lefty” captured four Cy Young Awards and is Phillies’ all-time wins leader
Robin Roberts > One of game’s most tireless pitching workhorses who successfully labored for “Whiz Kid” Phillies of 1950s
Mike Schmidt > Arguably baseball’s greatest third baseman, owner of 548 career homers and three MVP plaques


1900 75 63 .543 8 3 .290 810 29 205 4.12 Elmer Flick Al Orth 301,913
1901 83 57 .593 7.5 2 .266 668 24 199 2.87 Ed Delahanty Al Orth 234,937
1902 56 81 .409 46 7 .247 484 5 108 3.50 Roy Thomas Doc White 112,066
1903 49 86 .363 39.5 7 .268 617 12 120 3.96 Roy Thomas Tully Sparks 151,729
1904 52 100 .342 53.5 8 .248 571 23 159 3.39 Roy Thomas Tully Sparks 140,771
1905 83 69 .546 21.5 4 .260 708 16 180 2.81 Sherry Magee Totie Pittinger 317,932
1906 71 82 .454 45.5 4 .241 528 12 180 2.58 Sherry Magee Tully Sparks 294,680
1907 83 64 .565 21.5 3 .236 514 12 154 2.43 Sherry Magee Tully Sparks 341,216
1908 83 71 .539 16 4 .244 504 11 200 2.10 Sherry Magee George McQuillan 420,660
1909 74 79 .484 36.5 5 .244 517 12 185 2.44 Sherry Magee George McQuillan 303,177
1910 78 75 .510 25.5 4 .255 674 22 199 3.05 Sherry Magee Earl Moore 296,597
1911 79 73 .520 19.5 4 .259 658 60 153 3.30 Sherry Magee Pete Alexander 416,000
1912 73 79 .480 30.5 5 .267 670 43 159 3.25 Dode Paskert Pete Alexander 250,000
1913 88 63 .583 12.5 2 .265 693 73 156 3.15 Gavvy Cravath Tom Seaton 470,000
1914 74 80 .481 20.5 6 .263 651 62 145 3.06 Sherry Magee Pete Alexander 138,474
1915 90 62 .592 --- #1 .247 589 58 121 2.17 Gavvy Cravath Pete Alexander 449,898
1916 91 62 .595 2.5 2 .250 581 42 149 2.36 Gavvy Cravath Pete Alexander 515,365
1917 87 65 .572 10 2 .248 578 38 109 2.46 Gavvy Cravath Pete Alexander 354,428
1918 55 68 .447 26 6 .244 430 25 97 3.15 Irish Meusel Brad Hogg 122,266
1919 47 90 .343 47.5 8 .251 510 42 114 4.14 Irish Meusel Lee Meadows 240,424
1920 62 91 .405 30.5 8 .263 565 64 100 3.63 Cy Williams Lee Meadows 330,998
1921 51 103 .331 43.5 8 .284 617 88 66 4.48 Cy Williams Lee Meadows 273,961
1922 57 96 .373 35.5 7 .282 738 116 48 4.64 Curt Walker Lee Meadows 232,471
1923 50 104 .325 45.5 8 .278 748 112 70 5.34 Cy Williams Jimmy Ring 228,168
1924 55 96 .364 37 7 .275 676 94 57 4.87 Cy Williams Jimmy Ring 299,818
1925 68 85 .444 27 T-6 .295 812 100 48 5.02 George Harper Hal Carlson 304,905
1926 58 93 .384 29.5 8 .281 687 75 47 5.03 Freddy Leach Hal Carlson 240,600
1927 51 103 .331 43 8 .280 678 57 68 5.36 Cy Williams Dutch Ulrich 305,420
1928 43 109 .283 51 8 .267 660 85 53 5.52 Freddy Leach Ray Benge 182,168
1929 71 82 .464 27.5 5 .309 897 153 59 6.09 Chuck Klein Claude Willoughby 281,200
1930 52 102 .338 40 8 .315 944 126 34 6.71 Chuck Klein Phil Collins 299,007
1931 66 88 .429 35 6 .279 684 81 42 4.58 Chuck Klein Jumbo Elliott 284,849

“It might be exaggerating to say the outfield wall cast a shadow across the infield, but if the right fielder had eaten onions at lunch the second baseman knew it.”
—Sportswriter Red Smith on Baker Bowl, notorious for its short distance to right field


1932 78 76 .506 12 4 .292 844 122 71 4.47 Chuck Klein Flint Rhem 268,914
1933 60 92 .395 31 7 .274 607 60 55 4.34 Chuck Klein Ed Holley 156,421
1934 56 93 .376 37 7 .284 675 56 52 4.76 Ethan Allen Curt Davis 169,885
1935 64 89 .418 35.5 7 .269 685 92 52 4.76 Johnny Moore Curt Davis 205,470
1936 54 100 .351 38 8 .281 726 103 50 4.64 Dolph Camilli Claude Passeau 249,219
1937 61 92 .399 34.5 7 .273 724 103 66 5.05 Dolph Camilli Claude Passeau 212,790
1938 45 105 .300 43 8 .254 550 40 38 4.93 Hersh Martin Al Hollingsworth 166,111
1939 45 106 .298 50.5 8 .261 553 49 47 5.17 Morrie Arnovich Kirby Higbe 277,973
1940 50 103 .327 50 8 .238 494 75 25 4.40 Pinky May Kirby Higbe 207,177
1941 43 111 .279 57 8 .244 501 64 65 4.50 Nick Etten Johnny Podgajny 231,401
1942 42 109 .278 62.5 8 .232 394 44 37 4.12 Danny Litwhiler Tommy Hughes 230,183
1943 64 90 .416 41 7 .249 571 66 29 3.79 Ron Northey Dick Barrett 466,975
1944 61 92 .399 43.5 8 .251 539 55 32 3.64 Ron Northey Ken Raffensberger 369,586
1945 46 108 .299 52 8 .246 548 56 54 4.64 Vince DiMaggio Andy Karl 285,057
1946 69 85 .448 28 5 .258 560 80 41 3.99 Del Ennis Schoolboy Rowe 1,045,247
1947 62 92 .403 32 T-7 .258 589 60 60 3.96 Harry Walker Dutch Leonard 907,332
1948 66 88 .429 25.5 6 .259 591 91 68 4.08 Del Ennis Dutch Leonard 767,429
1949 81 73 .526 16 3 .254 662 122 27 3.89 Del Ennis Russ Meyer 819,698
1950 91 63 .591 --- #1 .265 722 125 33 3.50 Del Ennis Robin Roberts 1,217,035
1951 73 81 .474 23.5 5 .260 648 108 63 3.81 Richie Ashburn Robin Roberts 937,658
1952 87 67 .595 9.5 4 .260 657 93 60 3.07 Del Ennis Robin Roberts 755,417
1953 83 71 .539 22 T-3 .265 716 115 42 3.80 Del Ennis Robin Roberts 853,644
1954 75 79 .487 22 4 .267 659 102 30 3.59 Richie Ashburn Robin Roberts 738,991
1955 77 77 .500 21.5 4 .255 675 132 44 3.93 Del Ennis Robin Roberts 922,886
1956 71 83 .461 22 5 .252 668 121 45 4.20 Stan Lopata Robin Roberts 934,798
1957 77 77 .500 18 5 .250 623 117 57 3.79 Ed Bouchee Jack Sanford 1,146,230
1958 69 85 .448 23 8 .266 664 124 51 4.32 Harry Anderson Robin Roberts 931,110
1959 64 90 .416 23 8 .242 599 113 39 4.27 Ed Bouchee Gene Conley 802,815
1960 59 95 .383 36 8 .239 546 99 45 4.01 Pancho Herrera Turk Farrell 862,205
1961 47 107 .305 46 8 .243 584 103 56 4.61 Johnny Callison Art Mahaffey 590,039
1962 81 80 .503 20 7 .260 705 142 79 4.28 Johnny Callison Art Mahaffey 762,034
1963 87 75 .537 12 4 .252 642 126 56 3.09 Johnny Callison Jack Baldschun 907,141
1964 92 70 .568 1 T-2 .258 693 130 30 3.36 Dick Allen Chris Short 1,425,891
1965 85 76 .528 11.5 6 .250 654 144 46 3.53 Johnny Callison Jim Bunning 1,166,376
1966 87 75 .537 8 4 .258 696 117 56 3.57 Dick Allen Jim Bunning 1,108,201
1967 82 80 .506 19.5 5 .242 612 103 79 3.10 Dick Allen Jim Bunning 828,888
1968 76 86 .469 21 T-7 .233 543 100 58 3.36 Dick Allen Chris Short 664,546
1969 63 99 .389 37 5 .241 645 137 73 4.14 Dick Allen Grant Jackson 519,414

Bushers Book

How does This Grea

1970 73 88 .453 15.5 5 .238 594 101 72 4.17 Deron Johnson Dick Selma 708,247
1971 67 95 .414 30 6 .233 558 123 63 3.71 Deron Johnson Rick Wise 1,511,223
1972 59 97 .378 37.5 6 .236 503 98 42 3.66 Greg Luzinski Steve Carlton 1,343,329
1973 71 91 .438 11.5 6 .249 642 134 51 3.99 Greg Luzinski Wayne Twitchell 1,475,934
1974 80 82 .494 8 3 .261 676 95 115 3.91 Mike Schmidt Jim Lonborg 1,808,648
1975 86 76 .531 6.5 2 .269 735 125 126 3.82 Greg Luzinski Larry Christenson 1,909,233
1976 101 61 .623 --- e 1 .272 770 110 127 3.08 Mike Schmidt Steve Carlton 2,480,150
1977 101 61 .623 --- e 1 .279 847 186 135 3.71 Mike Schmidt Steve Carlton 2,700,070
1978 90 72 .556 --- e 1 .258 708 133 152 3.33 Greg Luzinski Steve Carlton 2,583,389
1979 84 78 .519 14 4 .266 683 119 128 4.16 Mike Schmidt Steve Carlton 2,775,011
1980 91 71 .562 --- #*e 1 .270 728 117 140 3.43 Mike Schmidt Steve Carlton 2,651,650
1981 59 48 .551 2.5 1/3 .273 491 69 103 4.05 Mike Schmidt Steve Carlton 1,638,752
1982 89 73 .549 3 2 .260 664 112 128 3.61 Mike Schmidt Steve Carlton 2,376,394
1983 90 72 .556 --- #e 1 .249 696 125 143 3.34 Mike Schmidt John Denny 2,218,339
1984 81 81 .500 15.5 4 .266 720 147 186 3.62 Mike Schmidt Jerry Koosman 2,062,693
1985 75 87 .463 26 5 .245 667 141 122 3.68 Mike Schmidt Shane Rawley 1,830,350
1986 86 75 .534 21.5 2 .253 739 154 153 3.85 Mike Schmidt Steve Bedrosian 1,933,335
1987 80 82 .494 14 T-4 .254 702 169 111 4.18 Juan Samuel Steve Bedrosian 2,100,110
1988 65 96 .404 35.5 6 .239 597 106 112 4.14 Phil Bradley Kevin Gross 1,990,041
1989 67 95 .414 26 6 .243 629 123 106 4.04 Von Hayes Ken Howell 1,861,985
1990 77 85 .475 18 T-4 .255 646 103 108 4.07 Lenny Dykstra Terry Mulholland 1,992,484
1991 78 84 .481 20 T-3 .241 629 111 92 3.86 John Kurk Mitch Williams 2,050,012
1992 70 92 .432 26 6 .253 686 118 127 4.11 Darren Daulton Curt Schilling 1,927,448
1993 97 65 .599 --- #e 1 .274 877 156 91 3.95 Lenny Dykstra Terry Mulholland 3,137,674
1994 54 61 .470 20.5 4 .262 577 80 67 3.85 Lenny Dykstra Danny Jackson 2,290,971
1995 69 75 .479 21.5 2 .262 615 94 72 4.57 Gregg Jefferies Heathcliff Slocumb 2,043,598
1996 67 95 .414 29 5 .256 650 132 117 4.49 Benito Santiago Curt Schilling 1,801,677
1997 68 94 .420 33 5 .255 668 116 92 4.87 Scott Rolen Curt Schilling 1,490,638
1998 75 87 .463 31 3 .264 713 126 97 4.64 Scott Rolen Curt Schilling 1,715,722
1999 77 85 .475 26 3 .275 841 161 125 4.93 Bobby Abreu Curt Schilling 1,825,337
2000 65 97 .401 30 5 .251 708 144 102 4.77 Bobby Abreu Robert Person 1,612,769
2001 86 76 .531 2 2 .260 746 164 153 4.15 Bobby Abreu Jose Mesa 1,782,054
2002 80 81 .497 21.5 3 .259 710 165 104 4.17 Bobby Abreu Vicente Padilla 1,618,467
2003 86 76 .531 15 3 .261 791 166 72 4.04 Jim Thome Vicente Padilla 2,259,948
2004 86 76 .531 10 2 .267 840 215 100 4.45 Bobby Abreu Billy Wagner 3,250,092
2005 88 74 .543 2 2 .270 807 167 116 4.21 Bobby Abreu Billy Wagner 2,665,304
2006 85 77 .525 12 2 .267 865 216 92 4.60 Ryan Howard Brett Myers 2,701,815
2007 89 73 .549 --- e 1 .274 892 213 138 4.73 Jimmy Rollins Cole Hamels 3,108,325
2008 92 70 .568 --- #*e 1 .255 799 214 136 3.88 Chase Utley Brad Lidge 3,422,583
2009 93 69 .564 --- #e 1 .258 820 224 119 4.16 Ryan Howard J.A. Happ 3,600,693
2010 97 65 .599 --- e 1 .260 772 166 108 3.67 Jayson Werth Roy Halladay 3,777,322
2011 102 60 .630 --- e 1 .253 713 153 96 3.02 Ryan Howard Roy Halladay 3,680,718
2012 81 81 .500 17 3 .255 684 158 116 3.83 Jimmy Rollins Cliff Lee 3,565,718
2013 73 89 .451 23 3 .248 610 140 73 4.32 Dominic Brown Cliff Lee 3,012,403
2014 73 89 .451 23 5 .242 619 125 109 3.79 Chase Utley Cole Hamels 2,423,852
2015 63 99 .389 27 5 .249 626 130 88 4.69 Odubel Herrera Ken Giles 1,831,080

t Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the Phillies' History on This Great Game:

1930 baseball history1930: The Big Blastcast of 1930 For better and (mostly) for worse, the Phillies are the poster children for a wild offensive frenzy in which the National League as a whole hits over .300.


1950 baseball history1950: Gee Whiz! The Phillies overcome decades of futility and embarrassment with a rare National League pennant.


1964 baseball history1964: The Fizz Kids How the Phillies, leading the National League by 6.5 games with 12 left to play, suffer through baseball's most infamous pennant race collapse.


1980 baseball history1980: Finally Philly After nearly a century of trying but failing, the Phillies finally reach the championship podium.


1983 baseball history1983: The Good, the Old and the Ugly The Baltimore Orioles victoriously wind their way through the postseason, ultimately upending the Phillies—baseball's surprisingly good over-the-hill gang.


2008 baseball history2008: Out of Darkness, Rays of Light Thought to be eternally chained to the bottom of the AL East standings, the Tampa Bay Rays become one of the game's unlikeliest surprise teams with a stunning appearance in the World Series alongside the Phillies.


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The Phillies by the Decade


19th Century The franchise that has lost more games than any other in major league history didn’t waste any time counting the defeats when it limped through an inaugural, eye-wincing 17-81-1 campaign in 1883. Baseball pioneer Harry Wright was brought in afterward and stabilized the fledgling unit, which evolved to placing second or third seven times—but never first—before the turn of the century. The Phillies of the 1890s were especially brutal on pitching, with Tuck Turner (.380 as a Phillie), speedster Billy Hamilton (.360), slugger Ed Delahanty (.348), and Sam Thompson (.334) as major contributors; all four hit over .400 on a particularly potent 1894 roster that averaged .350—the highest recorded in pre-modern times.


1900s The Phillies were one of the teams hardest hit by player raids from the newborn American League and suffered for it through mid-decade before stabilizing as a .500 squad that seldom contended. That mild rebound was partially attributed to star hitter Sherry Magee, who went straight from unorganized ball to the majors at age 19. The 1900s were nearly overshadowed by a tragic 1903 incident when a crowded overhang behind Baker Bowl’s left-field bleachers gave way 20 feet onto a street during a game, killing 12 and injuring nearly 300.


1910s< /span> Further improvement took place in Philadelphia with the arrival of legendary pitcher Pete Alexander—who won 30-plus games over three successive seasons from 1915-17—and by slugger Gavvy Cravath, whose 24 home runs in 1915 were unusually high for the deadball era and, briefly, a record in modern times before Babe Ruth redefined offense in the 1920s. The Phillies won their first-ever National League pennant in 1915 but were easily taken care of in the World Series by the Boston Red Sox.


1920s Hard times set in as the Phillies, long having traded away Alexander, finished last in team earned run average every year during the decade—and placed last in general six times, their top mark a mediocre 71-82, fifth-place record in 1929. Excitement was to be found on offense, as Cy Williams became the first National Leaguer (in 1923) to hit 40 homers in a season.


1930s The Phillies’ offense continued to provide a solid punch, but their pitching took a worse beating and the team’s struggles in the standings continued, finishing last or next-to-last eight times while managing their only winning season over a 32-year span in 1932. The height of the Phillies’ outrageous imbalance of power and pitching came in 1930, when they hit .315—but lost 102 games because opponents hit .349 against them. The bandboxed Baker Bowl, the primary reason for the upswing in offense, was abandoned by the Phillies in 1938 in favor of Shibe Park, home of the A’s.


1940s The franchise hit its low point in the early 1940s when bankruptcy was declared and the alleged savior, new owner William Cox, butted heads with and fired manager Bucky Harris—nearly leading to a team revolt—before being ousted from baseball after one year for admitting he had bet on Phillie games. Cox’s successor, Robert Carpenter, built up a more respectable front office (but also made a half-hearted attempt to rename the team the Blue Jays, which failed to hold), and the team slowly began to improve on the field as a result.


1950s The momentum of the late 1940s peaked in 1950 when the youthful “Whiz Kids” Phillies won the franchise’s first pennant in 35 years, only to be swept in the World Series by the New York Yankees. From there, the Phillies began a gradual slow regression back towards the second division late in the decade, despite the efforts of prodigious ace pitcher Robin Roberts (who won 138 games from 1950-55), RBI machine Del Ennis and superb center fielder Richie Ashburn.


1960s Devolved into a gruff and undisciplined unit, the Phillies were remolded by tough young manager Gene Mauch—but not before enduring his own baptism in 1961 when the Phillies hit rock bottom with a 47-107 record that included a modern record 23-game losing streak. Just three years later, a NL pennant looked all but locked up for the Phillies, leading by 6.5 games with 12 to play—before a historic collapse scuttled their chances. Again, a brief flirtation at the top was followed by gradual decline for the rest of the decade.


1970s The Phillies sank further into the abyss to start the decade but emerged once more as a contender—this time for the long run—at new multi-purpose Veterans Stadium with a fresh generation of star talent including slugging third baseman Mike Schmidt, lumbering outfielder Greg Luzinski and stellar, quirky left-handed ace Steve Carlton. They won 100 games for the first time ever in 1976, won another 100 the next year and made three straight NLCS appearances—losing each time.


1980s After nearly 100 years in business, the Phillies finally won a world title in 1980 as they barely outlasted Houston in the NLCS and took down Kansas City in six games at the World Series. Philadelphia would return to the Fall Classic in 1983 with a cast of aging veterans named the “Wheeze Kids,” but lost to Baltimore in five games. Schmidt won three MVP titles during a decade in which notoriously tough Phillie fans inexplicably continued to ride him; as age wore him down late in the decade, the team also suffered as no one was ready to take his mantle.


1990s The Phillies would finish above the .500 mark only once in the 1990s, but they made it worth their while—with a raucous roster soaring to a NL East title and an upset NLCS victory over powerhouse Atlanta, before succumbing to Toronto’s heroics in a six-game World Series. Despite the emergence of Curt Schilling as a 300-strikeout ace and, later in the decade, the arrival of Scott Rolen and Bobby Abreu, the Phillies struggled behind a lack of pitching depth.


2000s With the help of a new ballpark (Citizens Bank Park) which frequently sold out, the Phillies were upgraded to one of baseball’s top teams with their longest string of winning seasons to date and a brilliant lineup that included the powerful Ryan Howard, gifted middle infielders Jimmy Rollins and Chase Utley and an emerging rotation fronted by Cole Hamels. The Phillies won back-to-back pennants in 2008-09, winning it all over Tampa Bay in 2008.


2010s The Phillies continued their reign into the 2010s as Roy Halladay and Cliff Lee beefed up the rotation and helped run the team’s streak of divisional titles to five. But chronic injuries to aging veterans mixed with an inability to effectively reload with young talent have brought the Phillies crashing back below .500—and into rebuild mode.


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