Oakland A’s

Known as the Philadelphia Athletics, 1901-54; Kansas City Athletics, 1955-67


Ballparks of the A’s
Columbia Park (1901-1908); Shibe Park/Connie Mack Stadium (1909-54); Municipal Stadium (1955-67), Oakland Coliseum (1968-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates team record. * - World Series champion. # - American League champion. w - Western Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1901 74 62 .544 9 4 .289 805 35 173 4.00 Nap Lajoie Eddie Plank 206,329
1902 83 53 .610 --- #1 .287 775 38 201 3.29 Lave Cross Rube Waddell 420,078
1903 75 60 .556 14.5 2 .264 597 32 157 2.98 Harry Davis Rube Waddell 422,473
1904 81 70 .536 12.5 5 .249 557 31 137 2.35 Danny Murphy Rube Waddell 512,294
1905 92 56 .622 --- #1 .255 623 24 190 2.19 Harry Davis Rube Waddell 554,576
1906 78 67 .538 12 4 .247 561 32 165 2.60 Harry Davis Eddie Plank 489,129
1907 88 57 .607 1.5 2 .254 584 22 137 2.35 Harry Davis Eddie Plank 625,581
1908 68 85 .444 22 6 .223 486 21 116 2.56 Harry Davis Rube Vickers 455,062
1909 95 58 .621 3.5 2 .256 605 21 201 1.93 Eddie Collins Chief Bender 674,915

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the Oakland A's?
Billy Beane > Front office architect of the low-budget winning teams in the 2000s using groundbreaking “Moneyball” theory
Charles Finley > Combative yet innovative Lord moved A’s from Kansas City and built a dynasty in Oakland during the 1970s
Rickey Henderson > Transitory stolen base king enjoyed many of his greatest moments over numerous stays with A’s
Connie Mack > Gentlemanly heart and soul of Philadelphia era, managing 50 years and amassing nine pennants with six world titles


1910 102 48 .680 --- #*1 .266 674 19 207 1.79 Eddie Collins Jack Coombs 588,905
1911 101 50 .669 --- #*1 .296 861 35 226 3.01 Frank Baker Eddie Plank 605,749
1912 90 62 .592 15 3 .282 779 22 258 3.32 Frank Baker Eddie Plank 517,653
1913 96 57 .626 --- #*1 .280 794 33 221 3.19 Frank Baker Chief Bender 571,896
1914 99 53 .651 --- #1 .272 749 29 231 2.78 Eddie Collins Chief Bender 346,641
1915 43 109 .283 58.8 8 .237 545 16 127 4.29 Amos Strunk Weldon Wyckoff 146,223
1916 36 117 .235 54.5 8 .242 447 19 151 3.92 Amos Strunk Bullet Joe Bush 184,471
1917 55 98 .359 44.5 8 .254 529 17 112 3.27 Ping Bodie Jing Johnson 221,432
1918 52 76 .406 24 8 .243 412 22 83 3.23 George Burns Scott Perry 177,926
1919 36 104 .257 52 8 .244 457 35 103 4.26 George Burns Walt Kinney 225,209
1920 48 106 .312 50 8 .252 558 44 50 3.93 Tillie Walker Eddie Rommel 287,888
1921 53 100 .346 45 8 .274 657 82 69 4.61 Tillie Walker Eddie Rommel 344,430
1922 65 89 .422 29 7 .270 705 111 60 4.59 Tillie Walker Eddie Rommel 425,356
1923 69 83 .454 29 6 .271 661 53 72 4.08 Joe Hauser Eddie Rommel 534,122
1924 71 81 .467 20 5 .281 685 63 77 4.39 Joe Hauser Eddie Rommel 531,992
1925 88 64 .579 8.5 2 .307 831 76 67 3.87 Al Simmons Slim Harriss 869,703
1926 83 67 .553 6 3 .269 677 61 56 3.00 Al Simmons Lefty Grove 714,508
1927 91 63 .591 19 2 .303 841 56 101 3.97 Ty Cobb Lefty Grove 605,529
1928 98 55 .641 2.5 2 .295 829 89 59 3.36 Al Simmons Lefty Grove 689,756
1929 104 46 .693 --- #*1 .296 901 122 63 3.44 Al Simmons Lefty Grove 839,176
1930 102 52 .662 --- #*1 .294 951 125 48 4.28 Al Simmons Lefty Grove 721,663
1931 107 45 .704 --- #1 .287 858 118 25 3.47 Al Simmons Lefty Grove 627,464
1932 94 60 .610 13 2 .290 981 172 38 4.45 Jimmie Foxx Lefty Grove 405,500
1933 79 72 .523 19.5 3 .285 875 139 34 4.81 Jimmie Foxx Lefty Grove 297,138
1934 68 82 .453 31 5 .280 764 144 57 5.01 Jimmie Foxx Johnny Marcum 305,847
1935 58 91 .389 34 8 .279 710 112 43 5.12 Jimmie Foxx Johnny Marcum 233,173
1936 53 100 .346 49 8 .269 714 72 59 6.08 Bob Johnson Harry Kelley 285,173
1937 54 97 .358 46.5 7 .267 699 94 95 4.85 Bob Johnson George Caster 430,738
1938 53 99 .349 46 8 .270 726 98 65 5.48 Bob Johnson George Caster 385,537
1939 55 97 .362 51.5 7 .271 711 98 60 5.79 Bob Johnson Lynn Nelson 395,022
1940 54 100 .351 36 8 .262 703 105 48 5.22 Bob Johnson Johnny Babich 432,145

Bushers Book
1941 64 90 .416 37 8 .268 713 85 27 4.83 Sam Chapman Phil Marchidon 528,894
1942 55 97 .357 48 8 .249 549 33 44 4.45 Bob Johnson Phil Marchidon 423,487
1943 49 105 .318 49 8 .232 497 26 55 4.05 Jo-Jo White Jesse Flores 376,735
1944 72 82 .468 17 T-6 .257 525 36 42 3.26 Dick Siebert Bobo Newsom 505,322
1945 52 98 .347 34.5 8 .245 494 33 25 3.62 Bobby Estalella Russ Christopher 462,631
1946 49 105 .318 55 8 .253 529 40 39 3.90 Sam Chapman Jesse Flores 621,793
1947 78 76 .506 19 5 .252 633 61 37 3.51 Ferris Fain Phil Marchidon 911,566
1948 84 70 .545 12.5 4 .260 729 68 40 4.43 Hank Majeski Dick Fowler 945,076
1949 81 73 .526 16 5 .260 726 82 36 4.23 Eddie Joost Alex Kellner 816,514
1950 52 102 .338 46 8 .261 670 100 42 5.49 Ferris Fain Bob Hooper 309,805
1951 70 84 .455 28 6 .262 736 102 47 4.47 Eddie Joost Bobby Shantz 465,469
1952 79 75 .513 16 4 .253 664 89 52 4.15 Ferris Fain Bobby Shantz 627,100
1953 59 95 .383 41.5 7 .256 632 116 41 4.67 Gus Zernial Alex Kellner 362,113
1954 51 103 .331 60 8 .236 542 94 30 5.18 Jim Finigan Arnie Portocarrero 304,666
1955 63 91 .409 33 6 .261 638 121 22 5.35 Vic Power Tom Gorman 1,393,054
1956 52 102 .338 45 8 .252 619 112 40 4.86 Harry Simpson Tom Gorman 1,015,154
1957 59 94 .386 38.5 7 .244 563 166 35 4.19 Gus Zernial Virgil Trucks 901,067
1958 73 81 .474 19 7 .247 642 138 22 4.15 Bob Cerv Ray Herbert 925,090
1959 66 88 .429 28 7 .263 681 117 34 4.35 Roger Maris Bud Daley 963,683
1960 58 96 .377 39 8 .249 615 110 16 4.38 Norm Sieburn Ray Herbert 774,944
1961 61 100 .379 47.5 T-9 .247 683 90 58 4.74 Norm Sieburn Jim Archer 683,817
1962 72 90 .444 24 9 .263 745 116 76 4.79 Norm Sieburn Ed Rakow 635,675
1963 73 89 .451 31.5 8 .247 615 95 47 3.92 Norm Sieburn Moe Drabowsky 762,364

“It makes them look like grasshoppers.”
—New York Yankees manager Ralph Houk on the A’s green-and-gold uniforms, introduced in 1963


1964 57 105 .352 42 10 .239 621 166 34 4.71 Rocky Colavito John Wyatt 642,478
1965 59 103 .364 43 10 .240 585 110 110 4.24 Bert Campaneris Rollie Sheldon 528,344
1966 74 86 .463 23 7 .236 564 70 132 3.56 Bert Campaneris Jack Aker 773,929
1967 62 99 .385 29.5 10 .233 533 69 132 3.68 Bert Campaneris Catfish Hunter 726,639
1968 82 80 .506 21 6 .240 569 94 147 2.94 Bert Campaneris Blue Moon Odom 837,466
1969 88 74 .543 9 2 .249 740 148 100 3.71 Reggie Jackson Blue Moon Odom 778,232
1970 89 73 .549 9 2 .249 678 171 131 3.30 Sal Bando Diego Segui 778,355
1971 101 60 .627 --- w 1 .252 691 160 80 3.05 Reggie Jackson Vida Blue 914,993
1972 93 62 .600 --- #*w 1 .240 604 134 87 2.58 Joe Rudi Catfish Hunter 921,323
1973 94 68 .580 --- #*w 1 .260 758 147 128 3.29 Reggie Jackson Ken Holtzman 1,000,763
1974 90 72 .556 --- #*w 1 .247 689 132 164 2.95 Reggie Jackson Catfish Hunter 845,693
1975 98 64 .605 --- w 1 .254 758 151 183 3.27 Reggie Jackson Vida Blue 1,075,518
1976 87 74 .540 2.5 2 .246 686 113 341 3.26 Gene Tenace Vida Blue 780,593

“We had a common bond on the A’s; everybody hated Charlie Finley.”
—Reggie Jackson


1977 63 98 .391 38.5 7 .240 605 117 176 4.04 Mitchell Page Vida Blue 495,599
1978 69 93 .426 23 6 .245 532 100 144 3.62 Mitchell Page Elias Sosa 526,999
1979 54 108 .333 34 7 .239 573 108 104 4.75 Dave Revering Rick Langford 306,763
1980 83 79 .512 14 2 .259 686 137 175 3.46 Rickey Henderson Mike Norris 842,259
1981 64 45 .587 --- w 1/2 .247 458 104 98 3.30 Rickey Henderson Steve McCatty 1,304,052
1982 68 94 .420 25 5 .236 691 149 232 4.54 Rickey Henderson Tom Underwood 1,735,489
1983 74 88 .457 25 4 .262 708 121 235 4.34 Rickey Henderson Chris Codiroli 1,294,941
1984 77 85 .475 7 4 .259 738 158 145 4.48 Rickey Henderson Bill Caudill 1,353,281
1985 77 85 .475 14 T-4 .264 757 155 117 4.41 Mike Davis Jay Howell 1,334,599
1986 76 86 .469 16 T-3 .252 731 163 139 4.31 Jose Canseco Curt Young 1,314,646
1987 81 81 .500 4 3 .260 806 199 140 4.32 Mark McGwire Dave Stewart 1,678,921
1988 104 58 .642 --- #w 1 .263 800 156 129 3.44 Jose Canseco Dennis Eckersley 2,287,335
1989 99 63 .611 --- #*w 1 .261 712 127 157 3.09 Mark McGwire Mike Moore 2,667,325
1990 103 59 .636 --- #w 1 .254 733 164 141 3.18 Rickey Henderson Dave Stewart 2,900,217
1991 84 78 .519 11 4 .248 760 159 151 4.57 Jose Canseco Dennis Eckersley 2,713,493
1992 96 66 .593 --- w 1 .258 745 142 143 3.73 Mark McGwire Dennis Eckersley 2,494,160
1993 68 94 .420 26 7 .254 715 158 131 4.90 Rickey Henderson Bobby Witt 2,035,025
1994 51 63 .447 1 2 .260 549 113 91 4.82 Geronimo Berroa Steve Ontiveros 1,242,692
1995 67 77 .465 11.5 4 .264 730 169 112 4.93 Geronimo Berroa Todd Stottlemyre 1,174,310
1996 78 84 .481 12 3 .265 861 243 58 5.20 Mark McGwire Billy Taylor 1,148,380
1997 65 97 .401 25 4 .260 761 197 71 5.49 Jason Giambi Billy Taylor 1,264,218
1998 74 88 .457 14 4 .257 804 149 131 4.83 Matt Stairs Kenny Rogers 1,233,343
1999 87 75 .537 8 2 .259 893 235 70 4.69 Jason Giambi Tim Hudson 1,434,610
2000 91 70 .565 --- w 1 .270 947 239 40 4.58 Jason Giambi Tim Hudson 1,603,744
2001 102 60 .630 14 ! 2 .264 884 199 68 3.59 Jason Giambi Mark Mulder 2,133,277
2002 103 59 .636 --- w 1 .261 800 187 46 3.68 Miguel Tejada Barry Zito 2,169,811
2003 96 66 .593 --- w 1 .254 768 176 48 3.63 Eric Chavez Tim Hudson 2,216,596
2004 91 71 .562 1 2 .270 793 189 47 4.17 Erubiel Durazo Tim Hudson 2,201,516
2005 88 74 .543 7 2 .262 772 155 31 3.69 Eric Chavez Huston Street 2,109,118
2006 93 69 .574 --- w 1 .260 771 175 61 4.21 Frank Thomas Barry ZIto 1,976,625
2007 76 86 .469 18 3 .256 741 171 52 4.28 Jack Cust Joe Blanton 1,921,844
2008 75 86 .466 24.5 3 .242 646 125 88 4.01 Jack Cust Justin Duchscherer 1,665,256
2009 75 87 .463 22 4 .262 759 135 133 4.26 Jack Cust Andrew Bailey 1,408,783
2010 81 81 .500 9 2 .256 663 109 156 3.56 Daric Barton Trevor Cahill 1,418,391
2011 74 88 .457 22 3 .244 645 114 117 3.71 Josh Willingham Brandon McCarthy 1,476,791
2012 94 68 .580 --- w 1 .238 713 195 122 3.48 Yoenis Cespedes Jarrod Parker 1,679,013
2013 96 66 .593 --- w 1 .254 767 186 74 3.56 Josh Donaldson Bartolo Colon 1,809,302
2014 88 74 .543 10 ! 2 .244 729 146 83 3.22 Josh Donaldson Sonny Gray 2,003,628
2015 68 94 .420 20 5 .251 694 146 78 4.14 Josh Reddick Sonny Gray 1,768,175

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the A's History on This Great Game:

1911 baseball history1911: The Legend of Home Run Baker Frank Baker famously powers the Philadelphia Athletics past an aggressive New York Giant squad in the World Series.


1915 baseball history1915: The Great Connie Mack Fire Sale Sensing bad vibes and bad finances, A's manager Connie Mack tears apart his first dynasty.


1929 baseball history1929: Running on Ehmke All but washed up, veteran pitcher Howard Ehmke gets the dream call for Game One of the World Series and delivers, setting the tone for a long-overdue championship for the A's.


1971 baseball history1971: Dynasty on the Rise After years of constant losing, the colorful Charles Finley finally has a winner with the A's in Oakland.


1989 baseball history1989: Of Triumph and Tragedy In a rough year for the game, the local euphoria of a Bay Area World Series between the A's and San Francisco Giants turns horrific when a major earthquake strikes before Game Three.


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The A's by the Decade


1900s Based in Philadelphia, the A’s became one of the American League’s early successes under the trusty and temperate guidance of manager Connie Mack, who chucked away his uniform for a three-piece suit in the dugout. Harry Davis ruled as an early deadball era “slugger” and the pitching was dominated by the consistent Eddie Plank and colorful, unpredictable Rube Waddell. The A’s won two pennants during the decade, which ended with a move into 20,000-seat Shibe Park—baseball’s first steel-and-concrete ballpark.


1910s A tale of two decades for the A’s. The first half was a dynastic effort in which the team won four pennants and their first three World Series thanks to the presence of the “$100,000 Infield” consisting of Eddie Collins, Frank “Home Run” Baker, Stuffy McInnis and Jack Barry. But Mack, now the team’s co-owner, became fearful of spiraling salaries and economic hard times and unloaded his star talent overnight after 1914, plunging the A’s into the cellar for the balance of the decade—bottoming out in 1916 with the AL’s worst-ever record of 36-117.


1920s The aftershocks of Mack’s first major selloff continued into the 1920s, but the A’s gradually migrated from the second division with the flowering of a second wave of talent led by muscular slugger Jimmie Foxx, tough-as-nails batting crown contender Al Simmons, astute catcher Mickey Cochrane and southpaw ace Lefty Grove, who would come to dominate the AL through the 1930s. The new and improved A’s reached their peak in 1929 with the first of three consecutive AL titles—and two straight World Series championships.


1930s The Great Depression hit Mack’s wallet deeply—leaving him no choice but to clean house for the second time in 20 years. The A’s latest dynasty was torn down over more time than the first, but it was painfully evident that the franchise was once again headed into a long-term abyss. Slugger Bob Johnson did the best he could to keep the A’s watchable for the few that bothered to show up at Shibe Park, but the pitching was atrocious and the team shuffled between seventh and eighth (last) place throughout the final half of the decade.


1940s An aging Mack, by now a figurehead in the dugout as younger coaches increasingly took over tactical control of the games, witnessed a franchise slipping into irrelevancy; not even World War II, which shook up baseball’s power balance and determined contenders with the luck of the draft, could buoy the A’s briefly toward the top. After the war, the A’s made a rare and brief run to respectability, finishing just above .500 from 1947-49 with a patient and resistant lineup that specialized in drawing walks and getting hit by pitches.


1950s Mack managed for the 50th and last time in 1950 at age 87, stepping full-time into the owner’s office until a family feud forced the sale of the franchise. New lord Arnold Johnson left two-team Philadelphia in 1955 and moved the A’s to Kansas City, where the team continued as a perennial pretender and was often joked to be the top farm club for the powerhouse New York Yankees—based on the many one-sided deals that sent Roger Maris, Ralph Terry and many others from Missouri to Gotham.


1960s Johnson suffered a fatal heart attack in 1960, and the A’s were soon sold to tempestuous insurance magnate Charles O. Finley, the ultimate salesman who never listened to anyone but himself and held brash, bold thoughts on how to shake up the game. Cosmetically, he spiced up the A’s uniforms with a unique Kelly green-and-gold color scheme in 1963, but the team remained awful as he publicly threatened to move the team out of Kansas City—getting his wish in 1968 when he relocated to Oakland, finishing a 13-year existence in Missouri during which the A’s never had a winning record.


1970s Finley finally built a winner with a cast of mustached characters (including Hall of Famers Reggie Jackson, Catfish Hunter and Rollie Fingers) that matched his flamboyant and turbulent personality, as the A’s won five straight AL West titles and, from 1972-74, became the first team other than the Yankees to win three straight World Series titles. But Finley attacked the advent of free agency and attempted to sell off his best players as Mack had twice done previously—only to be denied by commissioner and constant adversary Bowie Kuhn. Most of Finley’s stars left as free agents and the A’s were rendered a shell of their former greatness, losing 108 games and drawing only 300,000 fans in 1979 during his last full year of ownership.


1980s In sharp contrast to the penurious Finley, new owner Walter Haas spent freely and aggressively marketed the A’s, mushrooming attendance totals in Oakland. All this, while the team remained ensconced in mediocrity save for a 1981 flirtation with the postseason thanks to a workhorse pitching staff and the speedy, record-breaking Rickey Henderson. Late in the decade, a new powerhouse emerged through a succession of top rookies (including “Bash Brothers” Jose Canseco and Mark McGwire) and reinvented pitchers Dave Stewart and Dennis Eckersley, who transformed from nomads to All-Stars under the stewardship of manager Tony La Russa. The A’s finished the 1980s with an earthquake-marred championship over cross-bay rival San Francisco.


1990s After winning their third straight AL pennant in 1990, the A’s faded from annual contention as age and general devolution hit their star players. When Haas died in 1995, a new regime came in and slashed payroll—quickly affecting performance on the field, as the team suffered six straight losing campaigns in the middle of the decade and blindly became labeled a small-market franchise even though it was within one of the country’s largest population centers.


2000s Responding to the team’s economic challenges, young general manager (and former A’s player) Billy Beane became a master at building contenders with pennies, relying more on statistical sabermetrics over traditional scouting. Under his watch, the A’s—powered by MVPs Jason Giambi and Miguel Tejada as well as their “Big Three” starting pitchers (Tim Hudson, Barry Zito and Mark Mulder)—put together eight straight winning seasons and five playoff appearances, but developed a nasty habit of failing to close out postseason series when advancement was well within their grasp.


2010s After a brief respite below .500, the A’s came back to life with back-to-back division titles in the competitive AL West under the usual recipe of youthful pitching and no-name overachievers—yet postseason gains remained a fleeting proposition. Off the field, owner Lew Wolff expressed his desire to leave the outmoded Coliseum and move 50 miles south to San Jose—but those plans hit a roadblock as the neighboring Giants, who own the territorial rights, refused to let them in. The A’s thus remain in the only stadium shared by both a MLB and NFL team.