New York Yankees

Known as the Baltimore Orioles, 1901-02; New York Highlanders, 1903-12


Ballparks of the Yankees
Oriole Park (1901-1902); Hilltop Park (1903-1912); Polo Grounds (1913-1922); Yankee Stadium (1923-2008); New Yankee Stadium (2009-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates team record. * - World Series champion. # - American League champion. e - Eastern Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1901 68 65 .511 13.5 5 .294 760 24 207 3.73 Jimmy Williams Joe McGinnity 141,952
1902 50 88 .362 34 8 .277 715 33 189 4.33 Jimmy Williams Joe McGinnity 174,606
1903 72 62 537 17 4 .249 579 18 160 3.08 Willie Keeler Clark Griffith 211,808
1904 92 59 .609 1.5 2 .259 598 27 163 2.47 Willie Keeler Jack Chesbro 438,919
1905 71 78 .477 21.5 6 .248 586 61 200 2.93 Willie Keeler Jack Chesbro 309,100
1906 90 61 .596 3 2 .266 640 17 192 2.78 Hal Chase Al Orth 434,700
1907 70 78 .473 21 5 .249 605 15 206 3.03 Hal Chase Jack Chesbro 350,020
1908 51 103 .331 39.5 8 .236 460 13 231 3.16 Charlie Hemphill Jack Chesbro 305,500
1909 74 77 .490 23.5 5 .248 589 16 187 2.65 Clyde Engle Joe Lake 501,000

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the New York Yankees?
Joe DiMaggio > Graceful superstar who lived up to his image and, in 1941, famously hit safely in 56 straight games
Lou Gehrig > The Iron Horse, quiet-natured but brutal on opponents; record consecutive game streak cruelly halted by disease that later killed him at age 37
Babe Ruth > Arguably the game’s greatest player, certainly its most influential; his arrival in New York ignited Yankee superpower era
George Steinbrenner > Controversial, hands-on Yankee owner resurrected franchise in 1970s and restored its greatness


1910 88 63 .583 14.5 2 .248 626 20 288 2.61 Birdie Cree Russ Ford 355,857
1911 76 76 .500 25.5 6 .272 684 25 269 3.54 Birdie Cree Russ Ford 302,444
1912 50 102 .329 55 8 .259 630 18 247 4.13 Bert Daniels Jack Warhop 242,194
1913 57 94 .377 38 7 .237 529 8 203 3.27 Birdie Cree Ray Caldwell 357,551
1914 70 84 .455 30 T-6 .239 537 12 251 2.81 Fritz Maisel Ray Caldwell 359,477
1915 69 83 .454 32.5 5 .233 584 31 198 3.06 Fritz Maisel Ray Caldwell 256,035
1916 80 74 .519 11 4 .246 577 35 179 2.77 Wally Pipp Bob Shawkey 469,211
1917 71 82 .464 28.5 6 .239 524 27 136 2.66 Wally Pipp Bob Shawkey 330,294
1918 60 63 .488 13.5 4 .257 493 20 92 3.00 Frank Baker George Mogridge 282,047
1919 80 59 .576 7.5 3 .267 578 45 101 2.82 Frank Baker Bob Shawkey 619,164
1920 95 59 .617 3 3 .280 838 115 64 3.32 Babe Ruth Bob Shawkey 1,289,422
1921 98 55 .641 --- #1 .300 948 134 89 3.82 Babe Ruth Carl Mays 1,230,696
1922 94 60 .610 --- #1 .287 758 95 62 3.39 Babe Ruth Bob Shawkey 1,026,134
1923 98 54 .645 --- #*1 .291 823 105 69 3.62 Babe Ruth Waite Hoyt 1,007,066
1924 89 63 .586 2 2 .289 798 98 69 3.86 Babe Ruth Herb Pennock 1,053,533
1925 69 85 .448 28.5 7 .275 706 110 69 4.33 Bob Meusel Herb Pennock 697,267
1926 91 63 .591 --- #1 .289 847 121 79 3.86 Babe Ruth Herb Pennock 1,027,675
1927 110 44 .714 --- #*1 .307 975 158 90 3.20 Lou Gehrig Wilcy Moore 1,164,015
1928 101 53 .656 --- #*1 .296 894 133 51 3.74 Babe Ruth Herb Pennock 1,072,132
1929 88 66 .571 18 2 .295 899 142 52 4.19 Babe Ruth Roy Sherid 960,148

“The secret of success as a pitcher lies in getting a job with the New York Yankees.”
—Pitcher Waite Hoyt


1930 86 68 .558 16 3 .309 1,062 152 91 4.88 Lou Gehrig George Pipgras 1,169,230
1931 94 59 .614 13.5 2 .297 1,067 155 138 4.20 Lou Gehrig Lefty Gomez 912,437
1932 107 47 .695 --- #*1 .286 1,002 160 77 3.98 Lou Gehrig Red Ruffing 962,320
1933 91 59 .607 7 2 .283 927 144 76 4.36 Lou Gehrig Lefty Gomez 728,014
1934 94 60 .610 7 2 .278 842 135 71 3.76 Lou Gehrig Lefty Gomez 854.682
1935 89 60 .597 3 2 .280 818 104 68 3.60 Lou Gehrig Red Ruffing 657,508
1936 102 51 .667 --- #*1 .300 1,065 182 77 4.17 Lou Gehrig Red Ruffing 976,913
1937 102 52 .662 --- #*1 .283 979 174 60 3.65 Joe DiMaggio Lefty Gomez 998,148
1938 99 53 .651 --- #*1 .274 966 174 91 3.91 Joe DiMaggio Lefty Gomez 970,916
1939 106 45 .702 --- #*1 .287 967 166 72 3.31 Joe DiMaggio Red Ruffing 859,785
1940 88 66 .571 2 3 .259 817 155 59 3.89 Joe DiMaggio Marius Russo 988,975
1941 101 53 .656 --- #*1 .269 830 151 51 3.53 Joe DiMaggio Marius Russo 964,722
1942 103 51 .669 --- #1 .269 801 108 69 2.91 Charlie Keller Tiny Bonham 922,011
1943 98 56 .636 --- #*1 .256 669 100 46 2.93 Charlie Keller Spud Chandler 618,330
1944 83 71 .539 6 3 .264 674 96 91 3.39 Snuffy Stirnweiss Hank Borowy 789,995
1945 81 71 .533 6.5 4 .259 676 93 64 3.45 Snuffy Stirnweiss Bill Bevens 881,845
1946 87 67 .565 17 3 .248 684 136 48 3.13 Charlie Keller Spud Chandler 2,265,512
1947 97 57 .630 --- #*1 .271 794 115 27 3.39 Joe DiMaggio Spec Shea 2,178,937
1948 94 60 .610 2.5 3 .278 857 139 24 3.75 Joe DiMaggio Vic Raschi 2,373,901
1949 97 57 .630 --- #*1 .269 829 115 58 3.69 Tommy Henrich Vic Raschi 2,283,676

“I want to thank the good Lord for making me a Yankee.”
—Joe DiMaggio


1950 98 56 .636 --- #*1 .282 914 159 41 4.15 Yogi Berra Eddie Lopat 2,081,380
1951 98 56 .636 --- #*1 .269 798 140 78 3.56 Gil McDougald Eddie Lopat 1,950,107
1952 95 59 .617 --- #*1 .267 727 129 52 3.14 Mickey Mantle Allie Reynolds 1,629,665
1953 99 52 .656 --- #*1 .273 801 139 34 3.20 Mickey Mantle Eddie Lopat 1,537,811
1954 103 51 .669 8 2 .268 805 133 34 3.26 Mickey Mantle Bob Grim 1,475,171
1955 96 58 .623 --- #1 .260 762 175 55 3.23 Mickey Mantle Whitey Ford 1,490,138
1956 97 57 .630 --- #*1 .270 857 190 51 3.63 Mickey Mantle Whitey Ford 1,491,784
1957 98 56 .636 --- #1 .268 723 145 49 3.00 Mickey Mantle Tom Sturdivant 1,497,134
1958 92 62 .597 --- #*1 .268 759 164 48 3.22 Mickey Mantle Whitey Ford 1,428,438
1959 79 75 .513 15 3 .260 687 153 45 3.60 Mickey Mantle Art Ditmar 1,552,030
1960 97 57 .630 --- #1 .260 746 193 37 3.52 Mickey Mantle Whitey Ford 1,627,349
1961 109 53 .673 --- #*1 .263 827 240 28 3.46 Mickey Mantle Whitey Ford 1,747,725
1962 96 66 .593 --- #*1 .267 817 199 42 3.70 Mickey Mantle Ralph Terry 1,493,574
1963 104 57 .646 --- #1 .252 714 188 42 3.07 Tom Tresh Jim Bouton 1,308,920
1964 99 63 .611 --- #1 .253 730 162 54 3.15 Mickey Mantle Whitey Ford 1,305,638

Who's on the Back-Up Mount Rushmore of the New York Yankees?
(Because the Yankees are too good to have just one)
Derek Jeter > The Captain; all-time Yankee hit king led team to seven pennants and five world titles
Mickey Mantle > Baseball’s ultimate matinee idol; all-around talent whose impressive career was dogged by injuries and booze
Billy Martin > Number One on the roster as well as the hearts of many longtime Yankee fans; loyal infielder and (five-time) manager
Mariano Rivera > Remarkable one-pitch closer reigns as all-time saves leader; remarkable 0.70 ERA in 96 postseason appearances


1965 77 85 .475 25 6 .235 611 149 35 3.28 Tom Tresh Mel Stottlemyre 1,213,552
1966 70 89 .440 26.5 10 .235 611 162 49 3.41 Joe Pepitone Fritz Peterson 1,124,648
1967 72 90 .444 20 9 .225 522 100 63 3.24 Mickey Mantle Al Downing 1,259,514
1968 83 79 .512 20 5 .214 536 109 90 2.79 Roy White Stan Bahnsen 1,185,666
1969 80 81 .497 28.5 5 .235 562 94 119 3.23 Roy White Fritz Peterson 1,067,996
1970 93 69 .574 15 2 .251 680 111 105 3.24 Roy White Fritz Peterson 1,136,879
1971 82 80 .506 21 4 .254 648 97 75 3.43 Bobby Murcer Mel Stottlemyre 1,070,771
1972 79 76 .510 6.5 4 .249 557 103 71 3.05 Bobby Murcer Steve Kline 966,328
1973 80 82 .494 17 4 .261 641 131 47 3.34 Bobby Murcer Mel Stottlemyre 1,262,103
1974 89 73 .549 2 2 .263 671 101 53 3.31 Bobby Murcer Pat Dobson 1,273,075
1975 83 77 .519 12 3 .264 681 110 102 3.29 Bobby Bonds Catfish Hunter 1,288,048
1976 97 62 .610 --- #e 1 .269 730 120 163 3.19 Mickey Rivers Ed Figueroa 2,012,434
1977 100 62 .617 --- #*e 1 .281 831 184 93 3.61 Reggie Jackson Ron Guidry 2,103,092
1978 100 63 .613 --- #*e 1 .267 735 125 98 3.18 Reggie Jackson Ron Guidry 2,335,871
1979 89 71 .556 13.5 4 .266 734 150 65 3.83 Reggie Jackson Tommy John 2,537,765

“Owning the Yankees is like owning the Mona Lisa. That’s something you never sell.”
—Yankee owner George Steinbrenner


1980 103 59 .636 --- e 1 .267 820 189 96 3.58 Reggie Jackson Tommy John 2,627,417
1981 59 48 .551 2 #e 1/6 .252 421 100 47 2.90 Dave Winfield Ron Guidry 1,614,353
1982 79 83 .488 16 5 .256 709 161 69 3.99 Dave Winfield Goose Gossage 2,041,219
1983 91 71 .562 7 3 .273 770 153 84 3.86 Dave Winfield Ron Guidry 2,257,976
1984 87 75 .537 17 3 .276 758 130 62 3.78 Dave Winfield Phil Niekro 1,821,815
1985 97 64 .602 2 2 .267 839 176 155 3.69 Rickey Henderson Ron Guidry 2,214,587
1986 90 72 .556 5.5 2 .271 797 188 139 4.11 Don Mattingly Dave Righetti 2,268,030
1987 89 73 .549 9 4 .262 788 196 105 4.36 Don Mattingly Tommy John 2,427,672
1988 85 76 .528 3.5 5 .263 772 148 146 4.26 Rickey Henderson John Candelaria 2,633,701
1989 74 87 .460 14.5 5 .269 698 130 137 4.50 Don Mattingly Lee Guetterman 2,170,485

“There are close to 11 million unemployed, and about half of them are New York Yankees managers.”
—Late-night talk show host Johnny Carson


1990 67 95 .414 21 7 .241 603 147 119 4.21 Jesse Barfield Dave Righetti 2,006,436
1991 71 91 .438 20 5 .256 674 147 109 4.42 Steve Sax Scott Sanderson 1,863,733
1992 76 86 .469 20 T-4 .261 733 163 78 4.21 Danny Tartabull Melido Perez 1,748,737
1993 88 74 .543 7 2 .279 821 178 39 4.35 Danny Tartabull Jimmy Key 2,416,942
1994 70 43 .619 --- e 1 .290 670 139 55 4.34 Paul O'Neill Jimmy Key 1,675,556
1995 79 65 .549 7 ! 2 .276 749 122 50 4.56 Bernie Williams Jack McDowell 1,705,263
1996 92 70 .568 --- #*e 1 .288 871 162 96 4.65 Bernie Williams Andy Pettitte 2,250,877
1997 96 66 .593 2 ! 2 .287 891 161 99 3.84 Tino Martinez Andy Pettitte 2,580,325
1998 114 48 .704 --- #*e 1 .288 965 207 153 3.82 Bernie Williams David Wells 2,955,163
1999 98 64 .605 --- #*e 1 .282 900 193 104 4.13 Derek Jeter Mariano Rivera 3,292,736
2000 87 74 .540 --- #*e 1 .277 871 205 99 4.76 Bernie Williams Mariano Rivera 3,055,435
2001 95 65 .594 --- #e 1 .267 804 203 161 4.02 Bernie Williams Mike Mussina 3,264,907
2002 103 58 .640 --- e 1 .275 897 223 100 3.87 Jason Giambi David Wells 3,465,807
2003 101 61 .623 --- #e 1 .271 877 230 98 4.02 Jason Giambi Mike Mussina 3,465,600
2004 101 61 .623 --- e 1 .268 897 242 84 4.69 Gary Sheffield Mariano Rivera 3,775,292
2005 95 67 .587 --- e T-1 .276 886 229 84 4.52 Alex Rodriguez Mariano Rivera 4,090,696

Bushers Book
2006 97 65 .599 --- e 1 .285 930 210 139 4.41 Derek Jeter Chien-Ming Wang 4,248,067
2007 94 68 .580 2 ! 2 .290 968 201 123 4.41 Alex Rodriguez Chien-Ming Wang 4,271,083
2008 89 73 .549 8 3 .271 789 180 118 4.28 Alex Rodriguez Mike Mussina 4,298,655
2009 103 59 .636 --- #*e 1 .283 915 244 111 4.26 Mark Teixeira CC Sabathia 3,719,358
2010 95 67 .586 1 ! 2 .267 859 201 103 4.06 Robinson Cano CC Sabathia 3,765,807
2011 97 65 .599 --- e 1 .263 867 222 147 3.73 Curtis Granderson CC Sabathia 3,653,680
2012 95 67 .586 --- e 1 .265 804 245 93 3.85 Robinson Cano Rafael Soriano 3,542,406
2013 85 77 .525 12 T-3 .242 650 144 115 3.94 Robinson Cano Mariano Rivera 3,279,589
2014 84 78 .519 12 2 .245 633 147 112 3.75 Jacoby Ellsbury David Robertson 3,401,624
2015 87 75 .537 6 ! 2 .251 764 212 63 4.05 Alex Rodriguez Andrew Miller 3,193,795
2016 84 78 .519 9 4 .252 680 183 72 4.16 Didi Gregorius Masahiro Tanaka 3,063,405

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the Yankees' History on This Great Game:

1920 baseball history1920: Saviors of the Game Babe Ruth and Kenesaw Mountain Landis restore excitement and credibility to an ailing game.


1923 baseball history1923: With Regards to Harry The Yankees become one of baseball's great dynasties at the willful expense of the Boston Red Sox and their Broadway-obsessed owner, Harry Frazee.


1927 baseball history1927: The Yankee Juggernaut The 1927 Yankees—the team often considered as the greatest ever—sweeps away the competition.


1928 baseball history1928: A Ruthian Rout World Series underdogs, a beat-up Yankee squad comes alive behind Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig.


1932 baseball history1932: The So-Called Shot Babe Ruth's historic and highly debated gesture gives a hostile World Series its flashpoint.


1936 baseball history1936: The New Yankee Juggernaut First-year star Joe DiMaggio upgrades the Yankees back to superpower status—and the start of an impressive dynasty.


1939 baseball history1939: Farewell, Iron Horse His game rapidly deteriorating, Lou Gehrig pulls himself out of the lineup—never to play again.


1949 baseball history1949: Casey at the Helm The zany Casey Stengel silences the critics and embarks the New York Yankees on a long and fruitful dynasty.


1952 baseball history1952: The Education of Mickey Mantle How the next in line to inherit the throne as the Yankees' icon nearly caved under the pressure.


1956 baseball history1956: A Perfect Revenge The Yankees' Don Larsen earns immortality in a day and denies the Brooklyn Dodgers their second straight title.


1961 baseball history1961: The Greatest Feat Ever Performed* Roger Maris experiences a year of triumph and troment as he threatens Babe Ruth's season home run record.


1965 baseball history1965: The Fall of the Yankee Empire After decades at the top, the Yankees are brought down by a combination of old age, nagging injuries and arrogance.


1977 baseball history1977: Reggie! Reggie! Reggie! Reggie Jackson caps a stormy first year in New York with a storybook flourish for the Yankees at the World Series.


1996 baseball history1996: Here's Spittin' at You, Kid The postseason takes on a tabloid-style existence with Roberto Alomar’s controversial inclusion in the playoffs, and a young fan in the right-field bleachers who saves the day—and maybe the season—for the Yankees.


2009 baseball history2009: The Salvation of Alex Rodriguez Baseball's biggest star embarks on a long, tough road from injury and damning steroid evidence.


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The Yankees by the Decade


1900s The franchise was born as the Baltimore Orioles and barely survived its first few years after manager John McGraw—repeatedly reprimanded by American League czar Ban Johnson for his constant harassment of umpires—attempted to sabotage the team. Johnson gained revenge by moving the franchise to New York in 1903, becoming direct competitors with McGraw’s new team, the New York Giants. The renamed Highlanders placed second twice during the decade, painfully missing out to Boston in 1904 despite a spectacular year for pitcher Jack Chesbro (41 wins, 454 innings).


1910s The seeds that would sprout Yankee greatness were planted throughout an otherwise forgettable decade. The team donned its famous pinstripes for the first time in 1912, were renamed the Yankees in 1913, and were sold in 1915 to the “Two Colonels”—Jacob Ruppert and Tillinghast Huston—who would preside over the club for the next 25 years. The Yankees also abandoned shoddy Hilltop Park to pay rent at the Polo Grounds, as the Giants returned the favor for earlier being allowed to borrow Hilltop after their ballpark burned to the ground in 1911.


1920s Babe Ruth became a Yankee in 1920, and a superpower was born. The Bambino changed baseball forever, bringing the home run into vogue while smashing offensive records across the board to lead the Yankees to six AL pennants and three world titles during the decade. Joining Ruth were numerous ex-Red Sox teammates including top-line pitchers Carl Mays, Herb Pennock and Waite Hoyt. The quiet but staggeringly potent Lou Gehrig joined the mix in the mid-1920s and, with Ruth, arguably formed the greatest one-two offensive assault in history. Majestic, voluminous Yankee Stadium was built in 1923 to accommodate the large crowds that occasionally filled the 74,000-seat facility to capacity.


1930s Yankee dominance continued undisturbed, even as Ruth began to decline; his void was filled by Joe DiMaggio in 1936, the first of four straight championship seasons under the steady, “push-button” leadership of manager Joe McCarthy. Great pitching was also to be found with the affable and unshakeable Lefty Gomez and Red Ruffing, the last of the Red Sox refugees. The decade ended on a heartbreaking note when Gehrig, having played brilliantly through 2,130 consecutive games, bowed from the sport after being diagnosed with a crippling muscle disease (ALS) that would take his life in 1941.


1940s The Yankees ran through another decade without a losing season, managing to stay competitive during World War II after being hit hard by the absences of star players to military service. When at full strength, the Yankees remained baseball’s elite team—winning five more pennants and four championships during the 1940s. Joe DiMaggio deservedly continued to hog the marquee as the team’s star, riveting the nation in 1941 with his historic 56-game hitting streak.


1950s With colorful Casey Stengel at the helm, switch-hitting matinee idol Mickey Mantle taking the baton from an aging DiMaggio as the latest Yankee icon, and confident Whitey Ford dominant from the mound, the Yankees commanded the AL as never before, winning eight pennants and six World Series titles during the 1950s; ironically, their best regular season performance of the decade (a 103-51 record in 1954) led to a second-place finish behind Cleveland. The highlight of the decade came during the 1956 World Series when Don Larsen threw baseball’s first perfect game in 34 years.


1960s An aging Stengel was replaced after a shocking World Series loss to Pittsburgh in 1960, and successor Ralph Houk guided the Yankees to four straight pennants behind the power-laden duo of Mantle and Roger Maris (who broke Ruth’s season home run record in 1961). CBS bought the team in 1964 and, almost instantly, the team unraveled—suffering its first losing season in 39 years in 1965 and, a year later, its first finish in the basement in over half a century. The introduction of baseball’s draft in 1965 further eroded the Yankees’ ability to reload with star talent.


1970s Mediocrity continued into the 1970s before CBS gave up, selling the franchise in 1973 at a loss. Taking over was the temperamental George Steinbrenner, who modernized aging Yankee Stadium and engaged in controversy on an almost daily basis. But he also fully embraced the advent of free agency and, as a result, paid handsomely to return championship glory to the Bronx, winning three straight pennants from 1976-78—the latter two followed up by world titles despite a tumultuous three-way rift between Steinbrenner, fiery manager Billy Martin and cocksure slugger Reggie Jackson.


1980s The Yankees won another pennant in 1981, but the weight of Steinbrenner’s ego became too much for the franchise as the decade developed, as The Boss made 13 managerial changes and plundered his farm system by trading away top prospects for over-the-hill veterans who couldn’t deliver the Yankees to the postseason. All of this, despite terrific offensive firepower from Don Mattingly (the most popular Yankee since Mantle), Dave Winfield and, for a brief but highly productive time, speedster Rickey Henderson.


1990s After serving a three-year suspension for using mob influence to dig up dirt on an arguably underachieving Winfield, an older, wiser and more mellow Steinbrenner went hands off his top prospects, allowing a new wave of young talent—including Derek Jeter, Bernie Williams, Jorge Posada, Andy Pettitte and closer Mariano Rivera—to take root and generate yet another Yankee dynasty. The usually fractured Yankee clubhouse became one under the relaxed leadership of manager Joe Torre, and the positive vibe helped lead New York in 1996 to the first of six pennants and four World Series titles over the next eight years.


2000s Empowered with a deep bank account that led to a series of shrewd free agent signings (Jason Giambi, Alex Rodriguez, CC Sabathia and Mark Teixeira), the Yankees regained the premise that anything less than a world title would be a disappointment. The new century would provide somewhat more challenging times as the Yankees constantly found themselves going nose-to-nose with the revived archrival Red Sox—but remained a perennial playoff contender, winning four more pennants and two more championship trophies. With a new Yankee Stadium opened in 2009 and the runaway success of the team-created YES Network, the Yankees became the second most valuable sports franchise in North America, behind the NFL’s Dallas Cowboys.


2010s The Yankees continued to win, but the air of invincibility became thinner as other teams began to catch up in spending after the death of Steinbrenner in 2010—with his sons showing a more realist, less passionate side atop the Yankee throne. The icons of the latest dynasty began to show their age and, one by one, they faded away—including Rodriguez, who fought hard to hang around after getting nailed with a second round of steroid accusations (he confessed the first time, in 2009).


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