New York Mets


Ballparks of the Mets
Polo Grounds (1962-63); Shea Stadium (1964-2008); Citi Field (2009-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates team record. * - World Series champion. # - National League champion. e - Eastern Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1962 40 120 .250 50.5 10 .240 617 139 59 5.04 Frank Thomas Roger Craig 922,530
1963 51 111 .315 48 10 .219 501 96 41 4.12 Ron Hunt Carl Willey 1,080,108
1964 53 109 .327 40 10 .246 569 103 36 4.25 Joe Christopher Galen Cisco 1,732,597
1965 50 112 .309 47 10 .221 495 107 28 4.06 Johnny Lewis Jack Fisher 1,768,389
1966 66 95 .410 28.5 9 .239 587 98 55 4.17 Cleon Jones Dennis Ribant 1,932,693
1967 61 101 .377 40.5 10 .238 498 38 58 3.73 Tommy Davis Tom Seaver 1,565,492
1968 73 89 .451 24 9 .228 473 81 72 2.72 Cleon Jones Tom Seaver 1,781,657
1969 100 62 .617 --- #*e 1 .242 632 109 66 2.99 Cleon Jones Tom Seaver 2,175,373
1970 83 79 .512 6 3 .249 695 120 118 3.45 Tommie Agee Tom Seaver 2,697,479

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the New York Mets?
Dwight Gooden > Extraordinary breakout ace of mid-1980s; ticketed to Cooperstown before being sidetracked by myriad of off-field problems
Ed Kranepool > Loyal team soldier saw it all as member of first 18 Mets teams; second all-time in franchise hits
Tom Seaver > Incomparable ace of his day; a fan favorite and three-time Cy Young Award winner
David Wright > Potent bat with numerous All-Star appearances, certain to finish career as greatest Mets hitter yet


1971 83 79 .512 14 T-3 .249 588 98 89 2.99 Cleon Jones Tom Seaver 2,266,680
1972 83 73 .532 13.5 3 .225 528 105 41 3.26 John Milner Tom Seaver 2,134,185
1973 82 79 .509 --- #e 1 .246 608 85 27 3.26 Rusty Staub Tom Seaver 1,912,390
1974 71 91 .438 17 5 .235 572 96 43 3.42 Rusty Staub Jon Matlack 1,722,209
1975 82 80 .506 10.5 T-3 .256 646 101 32 3.39 Rusty Staub Tom Seaver 1,730,566
1976 86 76 .531 15 3 .246 615 102 66 2.94 Dave Kingman Jerry Koosman 1,468,754
1977 64 98 .395 37 6 .244 587 88 98 3.77 Lenny Randle Jerry Koosman 1,066,825
1978 66 96 .407 24 5 .245 607 86 100 3.87 Lee Mazzilli Craig Swan 1,007,328
1979 63 99 .389 35 6 .250 593 74 135 3.84 Lee Mazzilli Craig Swan 788,905
1980 67 95 .414 24 5 .257 611 61 158 3.85 Lee Mazzilli Pat Zachry 1,192,073
1981 41 62 .398 18.5 5/4 .248 348 57 103 3.55 Dave Kingman Neil Allen 704,244
1982 65 97 .401 27 6 .247 609 97 137 3.88 Mookie Wilson Craig Swan 1,323,036
1983 68 94 .420 22 6 .241 575 112 141 3.68 Mookie Wilson Jesse Orosco 1,112,774
1984 90 72 .556 6.5 2 .257 652 107 149 3.60 Keith Hernandez Dwight Gooden 1,842,695
1985 98 64 .605 3 2 .257 695 134 117 3.11 Keith Hernandez Dwight Gooden 2,761,601
1986 108 54 .667 --- #*e 1 .263 783 148 118 3.11 Darryl Strawberry Bob Ojeda 2,767,601
1987 92 70 .568 3 2 .268 823 192 159 3.84 Darryl Strawberry Dwight Gooden 3,034,129
1988 100 60 .625 --- e 1 .256 703 152 140 2.91 Darryl Strawberry David Cone 3,055,445
1989 87 75 .537 6 2 .246 683 147 158 3.29 Howard Johnson Sid Fernandez 2,918,710

“I hate the Mets more than the Communists. At least the Communists don’t have offseason problems.”
—Bill Murray, actor-comedian and Cubs fan


1990 91 71 .562 4 2 .256 775 172 110 3.42 Darryl Strawberry Frank Viola 2,732,745
1991 77 84 .478 20.5 5 .244 640 117 153 3.56 Howard Johnson David Cone 2,284,484
1992 72 90 .444 24 5 .235 599 93 129 3.66 Eddie Murray Sid Fernandez 1,779,534
1993 59 103 .364 38 7 .248 672 158 79 4.05 Bobby Bonilla Dwight Gooden 1,873,183
1994 55 58 .487 18.5 3 .250 506 117 25 4.13 Bobby Bonilla Bret Saberhagen 1,151,471
1995 69 75 .479 21 T-2 .267 657 125 58 3.88 Rico Brogna John Franco 1,273,183
1996 71 91 .438 25 4 .270 746 147 97 4.22 Bernard Gilkey Matt Clark 1,588,323
1997 88 74 .543 13 3 .262 777 153 97 3.95 Todd Hundley Rick Reed 1,766,174
1998 88 74 .543 18 2 .259 706 136 62 3.77 John Olerud Al Leiter 2,287,948
1999 97 66 .595 6.5 ! 2 .279 853 181 150 4.27 Mike Piazza Armando Benitez 2,735,668

Bushers Book
2000 94 68 .580 1 #! 2 .263 807 198 66 4.16 Edgardo Alfonzo Armando Benitez 2,820,530
2001 82 80 .506 6 3 .249 642 147 66 4.07 Mike Piazza Armando Benitez 2,658,330
2002 75 86 .466 26.5 5 .256 690 160 87 3.89 Mike Piazza Armando Benitez 2,804,838
2003 66 95 .410 34.5 5 .247 642 124 70 4.48 Ty Wigginton Steve Traschel 2,140,599
2004 71 91 .438 25 4 .249 684 185 107 4.09 Mike Cameron Braden Looper 2,318,951
2005 83 79 .512 7 T-3 .258 722 175 153 3.76 David Wright Pedro Martinez 2,829,929
2006 97 65 .599 --- e 1 .264 834 200 146 4.14 Carlos Beltran Billy Wagner 3,379,535
2007 88 74 .543 1 2 .275 804 177 200 4.26 David Wright Billy Wagner 3,853,955
2008 89 73 .549 3 2 .266 799 172 138 4.07 David Wright Johan Santana 4,042,045
2009 70 92 .432 23 4 .270 671 95 122 4.45 David Wright Johan Santana 3,168,571
2010 79 83 .488 18 4 .249 656 128 130 3.70 David Wright Johan Santana 2,559,738
2011 77 85 .475 25 4 .264 718 108 130 4.19 Jose Reyes R.A. Dickey 2,352,596
2012 74 88 .457 24 4 .249 650 139 79 4.09 David Wright R.A. Dickey 2,242,803
2013 74 88 .457 22 3 .237 619 130 114 3.77 David Wright Matt Harvey 2,135,657
2014 79 83 .488 8 T-2 .239 629 125 101 3.49 Lucas Duda Jacob deGrom 2,148,808
2015 90 72 .556 --- #e 1 .244 683 177 51 3.43 Curtis Granderson Jacob deGrom 2,569,753
2016 87 75 .537 8 ! 2 .246 671 218 42 3.58 Yoenis Cespedes Noah Syndergaard 2,789,602

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the Mets' History on This Great Game:

1969 baseball history1969: The Amazin' Mets The New York Mets, perennial laughingstocks of the 1960s, perform a stunning about-face to end the decade.


1973 baseball history1973: Take My Division, Please In one of the closest—and mediocre—pennant races in history, the 82-79 Mets emerge on top of the NL East, then show extraordinary gains in the postseason against powerhouse opponents Cincinnati and Oakland.


1986 baseball history1986: An October for the Ages An unforgettable postseason offers up sensational comebacks, spirited performances and the making of baseball's most celebrated goat since Fred Merkle in Bill Buckner, whose legendary defensive gaffe highly benefits the Mets.


2000 baseball history2000: New York, New York The first Subway Series in 44 years is spiced with antagonism thanks to an ongoing feud between Roger Clemens and Mike Piazza.


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The Mets by the Decade


1960s Born from the ashes of the departed Giants and Dodgers of the late 1950s, the Mets made history out of the gate in the worst way by losing a record 120 games; nevertheless, they were fully embraced by a young wave of fans who came to see rusting New York baseball icons (led by aging manager Casey Stengel) giving it one last shot. The flood of losses flowed unabated until a crop of top young pitchers (Tom Seaver, Nolan Ryan and Jerry Koosman) turned the Mets into an overnight rags-to-riches success in 1969, ‘amazing’ the baseball world with 100 wins and a world title over the powerhouse Baltimore Orioles.


1970s The Mets remained competitive if not dominant in the early 1970s, as solid pitching continued to make up for a tin offense. They rose from a deadened start in 1973 and took advantage of a decrepit NL East with a first-place 82-79 mark, stunning heavily-favored Cincinnati in the NLCS before taking Oakland to seven games in the World Series. The front office’s stubborn refusal to embrace free agency late in the decade led to a meltdown on the field, especially once Seaver was dealt away midway through 1977.


1980s New management restored confidence in a bitter fan base, aggressively seeking free agents while developing two plum prospects—slugger Darryl Strawberry and wunderkind pitcher Dwight Gooden—who paid instant dividends. The blend of talented youth and all-star veterans hit a towering peak in 1986 when a raucous, cocky team of destiny took the National League by storm and produced a dramatic comeback in the World Series, triumphing over the beleaguered Boston Red Sox.


1990s The Mets flamed out for much of the decade, as Strawberry and Gooden collapsed under the weight of drugs, alcohol and numerous other run-ins with the law, while a new wave of high-priced free agents failed to reprise the magic of their predecessors from the 1980s. Only late in the decade did a turnaround finally develop with the arrival of veteran stars Mike Piazza and John Olerud, as well as the (albeit brief) emergence of catcher Todd Hundley and third baseman Edgardo Alfonzo, leading to the Mets’ first playoff appearance in 11 years in 1999.


2000s Making good on their second straight wild card call, the Mets took the NL flag in 2000 but lost a confrontational Fall Classic to the crosstown New York Yankees best recalled by Roger Clemens’ bizarre head games with Piazza. The team slumped at mid-decade but quickly saw a revival with genuine homegrown talent in David Wright and Jose Reyes, but suffered through a succession of collapses down the stretch that kept them out of the postseason. After 45 years at Shea Stadium, the Mets finally christened a new home in 2009 with Citi Field.


2010s The new ballpark was expected to further lift the Mets’ fortunes, but owner Fred Wilpon ran into major financial and legal troubles after being victimized in (and, some allege, associated with) Bernie Madoff’s Ponzi scheme. The resulting soap opera nearly bankrupted the Mets and had a deafening effect on the team, which finally climbed back into winning territory in 2015 with an unexpected NL pennant behind gifted young guns Matt Harvey, Jacob deGrom and Noah Syndergaard.