Milwaukee Brewers

Known as the Seattle Pilots, 1969


Ballparks of the Brewers
Sick's Stadium (1969); Milwaukee County Stadium (1970-2000); Miller Park (2001-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates team record. * - World Series champion. # - American League champion. @ - National League champion. e - Eastern Division champion. c - Central Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1969 64 98 .395 33 6 .234 639 125 167 4.35 Don Mincher Diego Segui 677,944
1970 65 97 .401 33 T-4 .242 613 126 91 4.21 Tommy Harper Marty Pattin 933,690
1971 69 92 .429 32 6 .229 534 104 82 3.38 Tommy Harper Ken Sanders 731,531
1972 65 91 .417 21 6 .235 493 88 64 3.45 George Scott Jim Lonborg 600,440
1973 74 88 .457 23 5 .253 708 145 110 3.98 Dave May Jim Colburn 1,092,158
1974 76 86 .469 15 5 .244 647 120 106 3.76 Don Money Tom Murphy 955,741
1975 68 94 .420 28 5 .250 675 146 65 4.34 George Scott Pete Broberg 1,213,357
1976 66 95 .410 32 6 .246 570 88 62 3.64 George Scott Jim Slaton 1,012,164
1977 67 95 .414 33 6 .258 639 125 85 4.32 Don Money Jim Slaton 1,114,938
1978 93 69 .574 6.5 3 .276 804 173 95 3.65 Larry Hisle Mike Caldwell 1,601,406
1979 95 66 .590 8 2 .280 807 185 100 4.03 Sixto Lezcano Mike Caldwell 1,918,343

“They know when to cheer and they know when to boo. And they know how to drink beer; they do it all the time.”
—Milwaukee slugger Gorman Thomas on Brewers fans


1980 86 76 .531 17 3 .275 811 203 131 3.71 Cecil Cooper Moose Haas 1,857,408
1981 62 47 .569 --- 3/1 .257 493 96 39 3.91 Cecil Cooper Rollie Fingers 874,292
1982 95 67 .586 --- #e 1 .279 891 216 84 3.98 Robin Yount Pete Vuckovich 1,978,896
1983 87 75 .537 11 5 .277 764 132 101 4.02 Cecil Cooper Moose Haas 2,397,131
1984 67 94 .416 36.5 7 .262 641 96 52 4.06 Robin Yount Don Sutton 1,608,509
1985 71 90 .441 28 6 .263 690 101 69 4.39 Cecil Cooper Ted Higuera 1,360,265
1986 77 84 .478 18 6 .255 667 127 100 4.01 Rob Deer Ted Higuera 1,265,041
1987 91 71 .562 7 3 .276 862 163 176 4.62 Paul Molitor Ted Higuera 1,909,244
1988 87 75 .537 2 T-3 .257 682 113 159 3.45 Paul Molitor Ted Higuera 1,923,238
1989 81 81 .500 8 4 .259 707 126 165 3.80 Robin Yount Chris Bosio 1,970,735
1990 74 88 .457 14 6 .256 732 128 164 4.08 Dave Parker Ron Robinson 1,752,900
1991 83 79 .512 8 4 .271 799 116 106 4.14 Paul Molitor Bill Wegman 1,478,729
1992 92 70 .568 4 2 .268 740 82 256 3.43 Paul Molitor Jaime Navarro 1,857,351

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the Milwaukee Brewers?
Paul Molitor > Multi-faceted catalyst for the Brew Crew sluggers of the 1970s and 1980s, owner of 39-game hit streak in 1987
Bud Selig > Championed baseball’s return to Milwaukee and ran Brewers until his promotion to commissioner
Bob Uecker > Brewers’ long-time broadcast voice, known for his folksy wit and self-deprecating sense of humor
Robin Yount > Milwaukee lifer, two-time MVP and Hall of Famer who debuted at age 18 and collected over 3,000 hits


1993 69 93 .426 26 7 .258 733 125 138 4.45 Greg Vaughn Cal Eldred 1,688,080
1994 53 62 .461 15 5 .263 547 99 59 4.62 Greg Vaughn Ricky Bones 1,268,399
1995 65 79 .451 35 4 .266 740 128 105 4.82 B.J. Surhoff Steve Sparks 1,087,560
1996 80 82 .494 19.5 3 .279 894 178 101 5.17 John Jaha Ben McDonald 1,327,155
1997 78 83 .484 8 3 .260 681 135 103 4.22 Jeromy Burnitz Doug Jones 1,444,027
1998 74 88 .457 28 5 .260 707 152 81 4.63 Jeromy Burnitz Bob Wickman 1,811,593
1999 74 87 .460 22.5 5 .273 815 165 81 5.07 Jeromy Burnitz Bob Wickman 1,701,796
2000 73 89 .451 22 3 .246 740 177 72 4.64 Geoff Jenkins Jamey Wright 1,573,621
2001 68 94 .420 25 4 .251 740 209 66 4.64 Richie Sexson Jamey Wright 2,811,041
2002 56 106 .346 41 6 .253 627 139 94 4.73 Richie Sexson Ben Sheets 1,969,153
2003 68 94 .420 20 6 .256 714 196 99 5.02 Richie Sexson Ben Sheets 1,700,354
2004 67 94 .416 37.5 6 .248 634 135 138 4.24 Lyle Overbay Ben Sheets 2,062,382
2005 81 81 .500 19 3 .259 726 175 79 3.97 Geoff Jenkins Derrick Turnbow 2,211,023
2006 75 87 .463 8.5 4 .258 730 180 71 4.82 Bill Hall Chris Capuano 2,335,643
2007 83 79 .512 2 2 .262 801 231 96 4.41 Prince Fielder Francisco Cordero 2,869,144
2008 90 72 .556 7.5 ! 2 .253 750 198 108 3.85 Ryan Braun CC Sabathia 3,068,458
2009 80 82 .494 11 3 .263 785 182 68 4.83 Prince Fielder Trevor Hoffman 3,037,451
2010 77 85 .475 14 3 .262 750 182 81 4.58 Ryan Braun John Axford 2,776,531
2011 96 66 .593 --- c 1 .261 721 185 94 3.63 Ryan Braun John Axford 3,071,373
2012 83 79 .512 14 3 .259 776 202 158 4.22 Ryan Braun Yovani Gallardo 2,831,385
2013 74 88 .457 23 4 .252 640 157 142 3.84 Carlos Gomez Kyle Lohse 2,531,105
2014 82 80 .506 8 3 .250 650 150 102 3.67 Carlos Gomez Francisco Rodriguez 2,797,384
2015 68 94 .420 32 4 .251 655 145 84 4.28 Ryan Braun Francisco Rodriguez 2,542,588
2016 73 89 .451 30.5 4 .244 671 194 181 4.08 Jonathan Villar Zach Davies 2,314,614

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the Brewers' History on This Great Game:

1982 baseball history1982: Streaking Engagement In a year of roller coaster pennant races, series comebacks and nail-biting finishes, the St. Louis Cardinals get the last say with a come-from-behind World Series triumph over the high-powered Brewers.


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The Brewers by the Decade


1960s The franchise began in 1969 as the one-year blunder known as the Seattle Pilots, who played in a slightly upgraded minor league ballpark that was nowhere near ready for prime time. One year, 98 losses, skimpy attendance and plenty of red ink later, the Pilots’ ownership wanted to sell; they avoided a lawsuit by declaring bankruptcy, selling to a group of investors (including future commissioner Bud Selig) which was able to gain clearance and bring baseball back to Milwaukee a week prior to the start of the 1970 season.


1970s A change of scenery didn’t bring a change of results to the rechristened Brewers, suffering losing records in each of their first eight seasons; the brief, ceremonious return of an aging Hank Aaron to Milwaukee did little to bump up attendance that hadn’t been much of an improvement over Seattle’s gate. The Brewers’ luck turned overnight when the front office went through a major turnover for 1978, with the new regime building up an impressive core of offensive talent that included Robin Yount, Paul Molitor, Larry Hisle, Cecil Cooper and Gorman Thomas.


1980s The Brewers completed a run of six straight winning seasons that led to two playoff appearances, including a 1982 postseason that gave the team, which had roared back to life as “Harvey’s Wallbangers” under new manager Harvey Kuenn after a weak start, its only league title to date. The Brewers slumped in mid-decade, reviving briefly in 1987 when they won their first 13 games—followed by a 12-game losing streak. Yount and Molitor, both chugging their way to 3,000 hits, continued to be the loyal glue of the team.


1990s Hard times set in for the Brewers after the 1994-95 players’ strike, as the economic conditions of the times began to compound the franchise’s disadvantage of playing in one of the majors’ smallest markets; they weren’t awful, but they couldn’t contend, especially with pitching that was constantly among the worst within baseball. A sentimental chord was struck in 1998 when Selig, now the game’s commissioner, ‘returned’ Milwaukee to the National League 33 years after the Braves left Wisconsin for Atlanta.


2000s The Brewers caught up with modern times by moving into their own revenue-generating ballpark, the retractable-roofed Miller Park—but initially, it did nothing to improve play on the field, underscored when it finished with a franchise-worst 56-106 record in their second year there. But hope was on the way; booming Prince Fielder became an instant presence by mid-decade, followed shortly by sharp-hitting Ryan Braun. With them, the Brewers ended a 15-year run without a winning season in 2007—and one season later, made the playoffs for the first time in 26 years.


2010s The buzz from the end of the 2000s carried well into the new decade with occasional total gates of three million and, in 2011, the Brewers’ first divisional title since 1982. But the bubble of success popped with a strengthened division, the free-agent departure of Prince Fielder and admitted steroid use by Braun—who initially lied about it—casting a depressing pall over what little was left of the feel-good atmosphere.