Miami Marlins

Known as the Florida Marlins, 1993-2011


Ballparks of the Marlins
Joe Robbie Stadium/Pro Player Stadium/Dolphins Stadium/Land Shark Stadium/Sun Life Stadium (1993-2011); Marlins Park (2012-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates team record. * - World Series champion. # - National League champion. e - Eastern Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1993 64 98 .395 33 6 .248 581 94 117 4.13 Jeff Conine Bryan Harvey 3,064,847
1994 51 64 .443 23.5 5 .266 468 94 65 4.50 Gary Sheffield Robb Nen 1,937,467
1995 67 76 .469 22.5 4 .262 673 144 131 4.27 Jeff Conine Pat Rapp 1,700,466
1996 80 82 .494 16 3 .257 688 150 99 3.95 Gary Sheffield Kevin Brown 1,746,767
1997 92 70 .568 9 ! #*2 .259 740 136 115 3.83 Moises Alou Kevin Brown 2,346,387
1998 54 108 .333 52 5 .248 667 114 115 5.20 Cliff Floyd Jesus Sanchez 1,730,384
1999 64 98 .395 39 5 .263 691 128 92 4.90 Preston Wilson Antonio Alfonseca 1,369,421
2000 79 82 .491 15.5 3 .262 731 160 168 4.59 Preston Wilson Antonio Alfonseca 1,218,326

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the Miami Marlins?
Jeff Conine—Original team member and part of both World Series-winning rosters; affectionately known as Mr. Marlin
Jose Fernandez—Brilliant ace whose life was snuffed out by boating accident at age 24
Wayne Huizenga—Original owner who went for broke—literally—and forged the Marlins’ first World Series triumph in 1997
Jeffrey Loria—Love him or hate him (most prefer the latter), tight-fisted owner has presided over world title and building of Marlins Park


2001 76 86 .469 12 4 .264 742 166 89 4.32 Cliff Floyd Brad Penny 1,261,226
2002 79 83 .488 23 4 .261 699 146 177 4.36 Derrek Lee A.J. Burnett 813,118
2003 91 71 .562 10 ! #*2 .266 751 157 150 4.04 Derrek Lee Mark Redman 1,303,215
2004 83 79 .512 13 3 .264 718 148 96 4.10 Miguel Cabrera Armando Benitez 1,723,105
2005 83 79 .512 7 T-3 .272 717 128 96 4.16 Carlos Delgado Dontrelle Willis 1,852,608
2006 78 84 .481 19 4 .264 758 182 110 4.37 Miguel Cabrera Dontrelle Willis 1,164,134
2007 71 91 .438 18 5 .267 790 201 105 4.94 Hanley Ramirez Kevin Gregg 1,370,511
2008 84 77 .522 7.5 3 .254 770 208 76 4.43 Hanley Ramirez Ricky Nolasco 1,335,076
2009 87 75 .537 6 2 .268 772 159 75 4.29 Hanley Ramirez Josh Johnson 1,464,109
2010 80 82 .494 17 3 .254 719 152 92 4.08 Dan Uggla Josh Johnson 1,524,894
2011 72 90 .444 30 5 .247 625 149 95 3.95 Mike Stanton Javier Vazquez 1,477,462
2012 69 93 .426 29 5 .244 609 137 149 4.09 Giancarlo Stanton Mark Buehrle 2,219,444
2013 62 100 .383 34 5 .231 513 95 78 3.71 Giancarlo Stanton Jose Fernandez 1,586,322
2014 77 85 .475 19 4 .253 645 122 58 3.78 Giancarlo Stanton Henderson Alavrez 1,732,283
2015 71 91 .438 19 3 .260 613 120 112 4.02 Dee Gordon A.J. Ramos 1,752,235
2016 79 82 .491 --- 3 .263 655 128 71 4.05 Christian Yelich Jose Fernandez 1,712,417

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the Marlins' History on This Great Game:

1997 baseball history1997: A Blockbuster of a Binge Florida Marlin owner Wayne Huizenga quickly builds up a winner—and just as quickly tears it apart.


2003 baseball history2003: Curses, Inc. The surprising, out-of-nowhere Marlins are the benefactors of the latest historic gaffes perpetrated by the "cursed" Chicago Cubs and Boston Red Sox.


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Bushers Book

The Rockies by the Decade


1990s The Sunshine State’s first major league team began play in 1993 in flamboyant style, wearing bright teal hats in a stadium filled with bright orange seats. But the Marlins’ infancy was impacted by a case of bad timing when the 1994-95 players’ strike soured the mood and cut into attendance. Owner Wayne Huizenga aggressively countered by spending big, bringing in one All-Star after another to purge the expansion blues; in 1997 he succeeded, as the Marlins became the first wild card recipient to win a World Series. And just as fast, Huizenga—who claimed to lose $30 million in triumph—tore apart his team overnight, leaving the Marlins a 108-loss shell of their former greatness.


2000s The aftereffects of the great Huizenga selloff lingered into the new century as the Marlins struggled to return to respectability before making a sudden, shocking—and successful—second run at a World Series in 2003 when interim manager Jack McKeon took them from a sub-.500 record to the playoffs (again as a wild card) and upset the New York Yankees in the Fall Classic. But new owner Jeffrey Loria, using a bare-bones payroll policy, made a constant habit of selling off his best players just shy of free agency. In spite of all of this, the Marlins managed to remain a competitive .500 team.


2010s The demonization of Loria took on a new dimension when, while pleading poverty, he was found to be well in the black by hoarding millions in luxury tax revenue. Somehow, local politicians missed that memo and agreed to pay for the bulk of sparkling new Marlins Park, which opened in 2012. Loria celebrated the new ballpark by finally opening up his checkbook—then closed it back up after a dismal first season there, further straining relations between himself and the community. At least he’s finally thinking long-term with some of his emerging talent, signing über-slugger Giancarlo Stanton to a monster $325 million deal.