Los Angeles Dodgers

Known as the Brooklyn Trolley Dodgers, 1884-88; Brooklyn Bridgegrooms, 1889-98; Brooklyn Superbas, 1899-1910; Brooklyn Dodgers, 1911-13, 1932-57; Brooklyn Robins, 1914-31


Ballparks of the Dodgers
Washington Park I (1884-85; partial usage, 1886-89); Ridgewood Park (partial usage, 1886-89); Washington Park II (1890; partial usage, 1889); Eastern Park (1891-97); Washington Park III (1898-1912); Ebbets Field (1913-57); Roosevelt Stadium (partial usage, 1956-57); Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum (1958-61); Dodger Stadium (1962-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates modern era (1900 or later) team record. * - World Series champion. # - League champion. w - Western Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1884 40 64 .385 33.5 9 .225 476 16   3.79 Oscar Walker Adonis Terry  
1885 53 59 .473 26 T-5 .245 624 14   3.46 Bill Phillips Henry Porter  
1886 76 61 .555 16 3 .250 832 16   3.42 Ed Swartwood Henry Porter  
1887 60 74 .448 34.5 6 .261 904 25 409 4.47 Jim McTamany Adonis Terry  
1888 88 52 .629 6.5 2 .242 758 25 334 2.33 George Pinkey Bob Caruthers  
1889 93 44 .679 --- #1 .263 995 47 389 3.61 Oyster Burns Bob Caruthers  
1890 86 43 .667 --- #1 .264 884 43 349 3.06 Oyster Burns Tom Lovett 121,412
1891 61 76 .445 25.5 6 .260 765 23 337 3.86 Oyster Burns Bob Caruthers 181,477
1892 95 59 .617 9 3 .262 935 30 409 3.25 Dan Brouthers Ed Stein 183,727
1893 65 63 .508 20.5 T-6 .266 775 45 213 4.55 Tom Daly Brickyard Kennedy 235,000
1894 70 61 .534 20.5 5 .313 1,021 42 282 5.51 George Treadway Ed Stein 214,000
1895 71 60 .542 16.5 T-5 .282 867 39 183 4.94 Mike Griffin Ed Stein 230,000
1896 58 73 .443 33 T-9 .284 692 28 198 4.25 Fielder Jones Harley Payne 201,000
1897 61 71 .462 32 T-6 .279 802 24 187 4.60 Mike Griffin Brickyard Kennedy 220,831
1898 54 91 .372 46 10 .256 638 17 130 4.01 Fielder Jones Brickyard Kennedy 122,514
1899 101 47 .682 --- #1 .291 892 27 271 3.25 Willie Keeler Jim Hughes 269,641

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the Los Angeles Dodgers?
Sandy Koufax > Icon of 1960s pitching whose short but brilliant reign was one of baseball’s greatest
Tom Lasorda > Dodger lifer and proud of it—serving as player, coach and long-time manager overseeing five NL pennants and two world titles
Walter O’Malley > Shrewd Dodger owner stole hearts of Brooklynites but secured prosperous future in Los Angeles
Jackie Robinson > Legendary American hero who broke baseball’s color barrier and gave Dodgers ten years of Hall-of-Fame value


1900 82 54 .603 --- #1 .293 816 26 274 3.89 Willie Keeler Joe McGinnity 183,000
1901 79 57 .581 9.5 3 .287 744 32 178 3.14 Jimmy Sheckard Bill Donovan 198,200
1902 75 63 .543 27.5 2 .256 564 19 145 2.69 Willie Keeler Doc Newton 199,868
1903 70 66 .515 19 5 .265 667 15 273 3.44 Jimmy Sheckard Oscar Jones 224,670
1904 56 97 .366 50 6 .232 497 15 205 2.70 Harry Lumley Oscar Jones 214,600
1905 48 104 .316 56.5 8 .246 506 29 186 3.76 Jimmy Sheckard Doc Scanlan 227,924
1906 66 86 .434 50 5 .236 496 25 176 3.13 Harry Lumley Johnny Lush 277,400
1907 65 83 .439 40 5 .232 446 18 121 2.38 Harry Lumley Nap Rucker 312,500
1908 53 101 .344 46 7 .213 375 28 113 2.47 Tim Jordan Kaiser Wilhelm 275,600
1909 55 98 .359 55.5 6 .229 444 16 141 3.10 Al Burch Nap Rucker 321,300
1910 64 98 .416 40 6 .229 497 25 151 3.07 Zack Wheat Nap Rucker 279,321
1911 64 86 .427 33.5 7 .237 539 28 184 3.39 Jake Daubert Nap Rucker 269,000
1912 58 95 .379 46 7 .268 651 32 179 3.64 Jake Daubert Nap Rucker 243,000
1913 65 84 .436 34.5 6 .270 595 39 188 3.13 Jake Daubert Nap Rucker 347,000
1914 75 79 .487 19.5 5 .269 622 31 173 2.82 Zack Wheat Jeff Pfeffer 122,671
1915 80 72 .526 10 3 .248 536 14 131 2.66 Jake Daubert Jeff Pfeffer 297,766
1916 94 60 .610 --- #1 .261 585 28 187 2.12 Zack Wheat Jeff Pfeffer 447,747
1917 70 81 .464 26.5 7 .247 511 25 130 2.78 Casey Stengel Rube Marquard 221,619
1918 57 69 .452 25.5 5 .250 360 10 113 2.81 Jake Daubert Burleigh Grimes 83,831
1919 69 71 .493 27 5 .263 525 25 112 2.73 Hi Myers Jeff Pfeffer 360,721
1920 93 61 .604 --- #1 .277 660 28 70 2.62 Zack Wheat Burleigh Grimes 808,722
1921 77 75 .507 16.5 5 .280 667 59 91 3.70 Zack Wheat Burleigh Grimes 613,245
1922 76 78 .494 17 6 .290 743 56 79 4.05 Zack Wheat Dutch Ruether 398,865
1923 76 78 .494 19.5 6 .285 753 62 71 3.74 Jack Fournier Burleigh Grimes 564,666
1924 92 62 .597 1.5 2 .287 717 72 34 3.64 Jack Fournier Dazzy Vance 818,883
1925 68 85 .444 27 T-6 .296 786 64 37 4.77 Jack Fournier Dazzy Vance 659,435
1926 71 82 .464 17.5 6 .263 623 40 76 3.82 Babe Herman Jesse Petty 650,819
1927 65 88 .425 28.5 6 .253 541 39 106 3.36 Harvey Hendrick Dazzy Vance 637,230
1928 77 76 .503 17.5 6 .266 665 66 81 3.25 Del Bissonette Dazzy Vance 664,863
1929 70 83 .458 28.5 6 .291 755 99 80 4.92 Babe Herman Watty Clark 731,886
1930 86 68 .558 6 4 .302 871 122 53 4.03 Babe Herman Dazzy Vance 1,097,329
1931 79 73 .520 21 4 .276 681 71 45 3.84 Babe Herman Watty Clark 753,133
1932 81 73 .526 9 3 .283 752 110 61 4.27 Lefty O’Doul Watty Clark 681,827
1933 65 88 .425 26.5 6 .263 617 62 82 3.73 Johnny Frederick Van Lingle Mungo 526,815
1934 71 81 .467 23.5 6 .281 748 79 55 4.48 Leo Koenecke Van Lingle Mungo 434,188
1935 70 83 .458 29.5 5 .277 711 59 60 4.22 Sam Leslie Watty Clark 470,517
1936 67 87 .435 25 7 .272 662 33 55 3.98 Buddy Hassett Van Lingle Mungo 489,618
1937 62 91 .405 33.5 6 .265 616 37 69 4.13 Heinie Manush Van Lingle Mungo 482,481
1938 69 80 .463 18.5 7 .257 704 61 66 4.07 Dolph Camilli Freddie Fitzsimmons 663,087
1939 84 69 .549 12.5 3 .265 708 78 59 3.64 Dolph Camilli Hugh Casey 955,668

Why do the Dodgers wear red numbers on the front of their jerseys?
The numbers were the first placed on the front of a major league uniform to stand out whenever the team was shown on the emerging medium called television. They were to introduce the uniforms for the 1951 World Series, but the Giants’ Bobby Thomson put a stop to that with his famous “Shot Heard ‘Round the World” that denied the Dodgers the pennant. So the unis debuted in 1952 instead.


1940 88 65 .575 12 2 .260 697 93 56 3.50 Dolph Camilli Whit Wyatt 975,978
1941 100 54 .649 --- #1 .272 800 101 36 3.14 Pete Reiser Whit Wyatt 1,214,910
1942 104 50 .675 2 2 .265 742 62 81 2.84 Dolph Camilli Curt Davis 1,037,765
1943 81 72 .529 23.5 3 .272 716 39 58 3.88 Billy Herman Whit Wyatt 661,739
1944 63 91 .409 42 7 .269 690 56 45 4.68 Augie Galan Curt Davis 605,905
1945 87 67 .565 11 3 .271 795 57 77 3.70 Augie Galan Hal Gregg 1,059,220
1946 96 60 .615 2 2 .260 701 55 100 3.05 Dixie Walker Kirby Higbe 1,796,824
1947 94 60 .610 --- #1 .272 774 83 88 3.82 Jackie Robinson Ralph Branca 1,807,526
1948 84 70 .545 7.5 3 .261 744 91 114 3.75 Jackie Robinson Rex Barney 1,398,967
1949 97 57 .630 --- #1 .274 879 152 117 3.80 Jackie Robinson Don Newcombe 1,633,747
1950 89 65 .578 2 2 .272 847 194 77 4.28 Duke Snider Don Newcombe 1,185,896
1951 97 60 .618 1 2 .275 855 184 89 3.88 Jackie Robinson Don Newcombe 1,282,628
1952 96 57 .627 --- #1 .262 775 153 90 3.53 Jackie Robinson Joe Black 1,088,704
1953 105 49 .682 --- #1 .285 955 208 90 4.10 Duke Snider Carl Erskine 1,163,419
1954 92 62 .597 5 2 .270 778 186 46 4.31 Duke Snider Carl Erskine 1,020,531
1955 98 55 .641 --- #*1 .271 857 201 79 3.68 Duke Snider Don Newcombe 1,033,589
1956 93 61 .604 --- #1 .258 720 179 65 3.57 Duke Snider Don Newcombe 1,213,562
1957 84 70 .545 11 3 .253 690 147 60 3.35 Gil Hodges Don Drysdale 1,028,258
1958 71 83 .461 21 7 .251 668 172 73 4.47 Charlie Neal Johnny Podres 1,845,556
1959 88 68 .564 --- #*1 .257 705 148 84 3.79 Wally Moon Don Drysdale 2,071,045
1960 82 72 .532 13 4 .255 662 126 95 3.40 Wally Moon Don Drysdale 2,253,887
1961 89 65 .578 4 2 .262 735 157 86 4.04 Wally Moon Sandy Koufax 1,804,250
1962 102 63 .618 1 2 .268 842 140 198 3.62 Tommy Davis Don Drysdale 2,755,184
1963 99 63 .611 --- #*1 .251 640 110 124 2.85 Tommy Davis Sandy Koufax 2,538,602
1964 80 82 .494 13 T-6 .250 614 79 141 2.95 Willie Davis Don Drysdale 2,228,751
1965 97 65 .599 --- #*1 .245 608 78 172 2.81 Maury Wills Sandy Koufax 2,553,577
1966 95 67 .586 --- #1 .256 606 108 94 2.62 Jim Lefebvre Sandy Koufax 2,617,029
1967 73 89 .451 28.5 8 .236 519 82 56 3.21 Willie Davis Claude Osteen 1,664,362
1968 76 86 .469 21 T-7 .230 470 67 57 2.69 Willie Davis Don Drysdale 1,581,093

Bushers Book
1969 85 77 .525 8 4 .254 645 97 80 3.08 Willie Davis Bill Singer 1,784,527
1970 87 74 .540 14.5 2 .270 749 87 138 3.82 Wes Parker Claude Osteen 1,697,142
1971 89 73 .549 1 2 .266 663 95 76 3.23 Dick Allen Don Sutton 2,064,594
1972 85 70 .548 10.5 3 .256 584 98 82 2.78 Willie Davis Don Sutton 1,860,858
1973 95 66 .590 3.5 2 .263 675 110 109 3.00 Joe Ferguson Don Sutton 2,136,192
1974 102 60 .630 --- #w 1 .272 798 139 149 2.97 Jim Wynn Mike Marshall 2,632,474
1975 88 74 .543 20 2 .248 648 118 138 2.92 Steve Garvey Andy Messersmith 2,539,349
1976 92 70 .568 10 2 .251 608 91 144 3.02 Steve Garvey Don Sutton 2,386,301
1977 98 64 .605 --- #w 1 .266 769 191 114 3.22 Reggie Smith Tommy John 2,955,087
1978 95 67 .586 --- #w 1 .264 727 149 137 3.12 Reggie Smith Burt Hooton 3,347,845
1979 79 83 .488 11.5 3 .263 739 183 106 3.83 Davey Lopes Burt Hooton 2,860,954
1980 92 71 .564 1 2 .263 663 148 123 3.25 Steve Garvey Jerry Reuss 3,249,287
1981 63 47 .573 4 #*w 1/4 .262 450 82 73 3.01 Ron Cey Jerry Reuss 2,381,292
1982 88 74 .543 1 2 .264 691 138 151 3.26 Pedro Guerrero Fernando Valenzuela 3,608,881
1983 91 71 .562 --- w 1 .250 654 146 166 3.10 Pedro Guerrero Bob Welch 3,510,313
1984 79 83 .488 13 4 .244 580 102 109 3.17 Pedro Guerrero Orel Hershiser 3,134,824
1985 95 67 .586 --- w 1 .261 682 129 136 2.96 Pedro Guerrero Orel Hershiser 3,264,593
1986 73 89 .451 23 5 .251 638 130 155 3.76 Steve Sax Fernando Valenzuela 3,023,208
1987 73 89 .451 17 4 .252 635 125 128 3.72 Pedro Guerrero Orel Hershiser 2,797,409
1988 94 67 .584 --- #*w 1 .248 628 99 131 2.96 Kirk Gibson Orel Hershiser 2,980,262
1989 77 83 .481 14 4 .240 554 89 81 2.95 Eddie Murray Orel Hershiser 2,944,653

“Cut my veins and Dodger blue will flow.”
—Manager Tom Lasorda, Dodgers manager from 1977-1996


1990 86 76 .531 5 2 .262 728 129 141 3.72 Kal Daniels Ramon Martinez 3,002,396
1991 93 69 .574 1 2 .253 665 108 126 3.06 Darryl Strawberry Mike Morgan 3,348,170
1992 63 99 .389 35 6 .248 548 72 142 3.41 Brett Butler Tom Candiotti 2,473,266
1993 81 81 .500 23 4 .261 675 130 126 3.50 Mike Piazza Tom Candiotti 3,170,393
1994 58 56 .509 --- w 1 .270 532 115 74 4.23 Mike Piazza Ramon Martinez 2,279,355
1995 78 66 .542 --- w 1 .264 634 140 127 3.66 Mike Piazza Ismael Valdes 2,766,521
1996 90 72 .556 1 ! 2 .252 703 150 124 3.48 Mike Piazza Pedro Astacio 3,188,454
1997 88 74 .543 2 2 .268 742 174 131 3.63 Mike Piazza Ismael Valdes 3,319,504
1998 83 79 .512 15 3 .252 669 159 137 3.81 Raul Mondesi Chan Ho Park 3,089,222
1999 77 85 .475 23 3 .266 793 187 167 4.45 Gary Sheffield Kevin Brown 3,095,346
2000 86 76 .531 11 2 .257 798 211 95 4.10 Gary Sheffield Kevin Brown 2,880,242
2001 86 76 .531 6 3 .255 758 206 89 4.25 Shawn Green Chan Ho Park 3,017,143
2002 92 70 .568 6 3 .264 713 155 96 3.69 Shawn Green Odalis Perez 3,131,255
2003 85 77 .525 15.5 2 .243 574 124 80 3.16 Shawn Green Kevin Brown 3,138,626
2004 93 69 .574 --- w 1 .262 761 203 102 4.01 Adrian Beltre Eric Gagne 3,488,283
2005 71 91 .438 11 4 .253 685 149 58 4.38 Jeff Kent Derek Lowe 3,603,646
2006 88 74 .543 --- ! T-1 .276 820 153 128 4.23 J.D. Drew Derek Lowe 3,758,545
2007 82 80 .506 8 4 .275 735 129 137 4.20 Russell Martin Brad Penny 3,857,036
2008 84 78 .519 --- w 1 .264 700 137 126 3.68 Andre Ethier Chad Billingsley 3,730,553
2009 95 67 .586 --- w 1 .270 780 145 116 3.41 Matt Kemp Jonathan Broxton 3,761,655
2010 80 82 .494 17 4 .252 667 120 92 4.01 Andre Ethier Clayton Kershaw 3,562,320
2011 82 79 .509 11.5 3 .257 644 117 126 3.54 Matt Kemp Clayton Kershaw 2,935,139
2012 86 76 .531 8 2 .252 637 116 104 3.34 Andre Ethier Clayton Kershaw 3,324,246
2013 92 70 .568 --- w 1 .264 649 138 78 3.25 Adrian Gonzalez Clayton Kershaw 3,743,527
2014 94 68 .580 --- w 1 .265 718 134 138 3.40 Yasiel Puig Clayton Kershaw 3,782,337
2015 92 70 .568 --- w 1 .250 667 187 59 3.44 Adrian Gonzalez Zack Greinke 3,764,815

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the Dodgers' History on This Great Game:

1916 baseball history1916: A Test of Robins Brooklyn manager Wilbert Robinson takes on former pal and current foe John McGraw for the National League pennant.


1941 baseball history1941: 56, .406 and Dem Bums Joe DiMaggio's magical hitting streak, Ted Williams' run at .400 and the rise of the Dodgers result in one of baseball's most memorable years.


1947 baseball history1947: The Arrival of Jackie Robinson Baseball's color barrier is knocked down, but not without intense prejudicial resistance.


1955 baseball history1955: Next Year at Last At long last, the Brooklyn Dodgers secure their first—and only—world championship.


1958 baseball history1958: And Now, From Coast to Coast The Dodgers and Giants break the hearts of New Yorkers everywhere and head west to California.


1959 baseball history1959: Reinventing Dodger After a lackluster California debut, the Los Angeles Dodgers victoriously adapt to their new surroundings.


1963 baseball history1963: The Sandman Cometh After years of wildness and frustration, the Los Angeles Dodgers' Sandy Koufax becomes an ace for the ages.


1988 baseball history1988: Roy Hobbs in Dodger Blue Kirk Gibson makes like Robert Redford and gives the Los Angeles Dodgers a storybook ending.


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The Dodgers by the Decade


19th Century Born out of a borough rich in early baseball activity, the Dodgers started as a minor league outfit and, after winning the Interstate League title in 1883, moved up to the American Association a year later. They won their first pennant in their last season in the AA (in 1889) and then another a year later during its maiden National League campaign after making yet another move. Hopes for further success were fleeting until 1899, when the franchise was infused with front-office and on-field talent from the Baltimore Orioles, a NL powerhouse from earlier in the decade.


1900s The Superbas began the century in style with a National League pennant in 1900, but were hit hard by the player raids of the upstart American League, descending the team into a series of subpar (if not worse) finishes. By mid-decade, Charles Ebbets had secured complete ownership of the franchise and went about locating a spot for a proposed steel-and-concrete ballpark to replace the wooden Washington Park.


1910s Historic Ebbets Field opened in 1913 without initially translating into big attendance gains, but at least the team began a rebound in the standings. Wilbert Robinson, a long-time coach (and former friend) of New York Giant manager John McGraw, took over at the helm in 1914 and within three years produced a pennant thanks to a renaissance of former star pitchers (Jack Coombs, Rube Marquard) and the emergence of polite but dangerous hitter Zack Wheat.


1920s The Robins began the decade on a strong note by clinching their second NL pennant in five years, and once again fell short in the World Series. Some respectable campaigns followed in advance of a solid stretch of disappointment, as the Robins developed a boneheaded reputation for zany antics (intentional or not) that led to their being called the Daffiness Boys. All this, despite some of the league’s best pitching talent (led by Dazzy Vance and legal spitballer Burleigh Grimes) in a time ripe with lively hitting.


1930s Amid front office turmoil, Robinson stepped away after 18 years and with him went the name; Brooklyn became the Dodgers once more, but a trail of losing seasons made the franchise the heel of New York baseball as the crosstown Giants and New York Yankees thrived. Everything changed late in the decade with the brilliant and combustible pairing of powerful general manager Larry MacPhail and in-your-face manager Leo Durocher—both of whom would gang up to exorcise the clownish image and ignite a longstanding winning tradition.


1940s Blossoming into a powerhouse, the Dodgers won three pennants—but ran their World Series losing streak to five as they lost each time to the Yankees. MacPhail left and was replaced by renowned St. Louis executive Branch Rickey—who made history at the end of 1945 by signing Jackie Robinson as the century’s first black player in organized “white” baseball. Robinson made his historic Dodger debut in 1947, leading a rush of recruits that included Duke Snider, Gil Hodges and black pitcher Don Newcombe; attendance surged at Ebbets Field, often approaching two million fans a year.


1950s The glory of Brooklyn baseball reached its peak early in the decade as the Boys of Summer reigned, with Robinson, Snider and three-time NL MVP Roy Campanella sparking a lively offense at comfy Ebbets Field. After losing two more World Series to the Yankees in 1952-53, the Dodgers at long last won it all in 1955, conquering the Bronx Bombers with a memorable seven-game classic. But success on the field wasn’t enough for Dodger owner Walter O’Malley, who maxed out on revenue at Ebbets and wanted more; he would have to move the team to Los Angeles to get it, breaking far too many hearts in the Borough he left behind.


1960s The Dodgers’ success skipped nary a beat in California, as the team settled into beautiful Dodger Stadium in coveted Chavez Ravine near downtown Los Angeles in 1962. The personality of the team performed a coast-to-coast transformation, no longer built on slugging power but, instead, on stifling pitching that more than offset a popgun offense. Leading the way was the unmatchable Sandy Koufax, who arguably produced the single greatest run of pitching ever seen—coinciding with three pennants and two world titles over a four-year stretch at mid-decade.


1970s Long-time manager Walter Alston ceded to the boisterous Tommy Lasorda and the Dodgers continued their winning ways, restoring the balance on offense with a homegrown infield (Steve Garvey, Bill Russell, Davey Lopes and Ron Cey) that stuck together for a record eight years and lent long-overdue backbone to the pitching staff, which remained in top shape thanks to aces Andy Messersmith and Don Sutton. An old problem cropped up in the postseason: A failure to win, often against the Yankees—who prevailed over the Dodgers in 1977-78.


1980s The Dodgers pulled together two World Series triumphs seven years apart under entirely different circumstances in a decade dogged by inconsistency. Fueled by Mexican sensation Fernando Valenzuela, the Dodgers overcame the Yankees in strike-ravaged 1981 for one world title and, after some thin years that led to a forced embracement of free agency, shocked heavily-favored Oakland in 1988 thanks to the pitching magnificence of Orel Hershiser and the painful heroics of Kirk Gibson, whose highly unlikely, classic game-winning homer in Game One set a definitive tone for the upset.


1990s The stability of the franchise that had come to define the Dodgers—on the field and off—began to lose its glue, with Lasorda stepping down after 21 years and the O’Malley family cashing out after a half-century of ownership; media kingpin Rupert Murdoch bought in for what would be a short-lived and unsuccessful run. Still, the Dodgers remained competitive on the field, reaching the postseason three times (with no success) thanks to the impressive hitting of catcher Mike Piazza, a godson of Lasorda.


2000s The Dodgers began the new century continuing to fill up aging-with-grace Dodger Stadium and playing winning (if not dominant) baseball, with yet another round of home-schooled talent starting with superlative closer Eric Gagne (who racked up a record 84 straight saves without blowing one) followed by slugger Matt Kemp and future ace Clayton Kershaw. Manny Ramirez’s brief (and tumultuous) stay in Los Angeles brought the Dodgers to the brink of two straight World Series appearances at decade’s end.


2010s Major trouble brewed in the front office when owner Frank McCourt, crippled by divorce, drove the team deep into debt and declared bankruptcy in 2011; he came out a billionaire a year later when he sold the Dodgers for a record $2.15 billion to Guggenheim Partners, who have not been shy spending money in an attempt to restore Dodger greatness. Success soon followed with multiple trips back to October as elite ace Clayton Kershaw hit full stride as, arguably, the greatest pitcher in franchise history—but repeated failure to land a NL pennant led to the dismissal of manager Don Mattingly after 2015.


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