Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim

Known as the Los Angeles Angels, 1961-65; California Angels, 1966-96; Anaheim Angels, 1997-2004


Ballparks of the Angels
Wrigley Field (1961); Dodger Stadium (1962-65); Anaheim Stadium/Edison International Field/Angel Stadium of Anaheim (1966-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates team record. * - World Series champion. # - American League champion. w - Western Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1961 70 91 .435 38.5 8 .245 744 189 37 4.31 Leon Wagner Tom Morgan 603,510
1962 86 76 .531 10 3 .250 718 137 46 3.70 Leon Wagner Dean Chance 1,144,063
1963 70 91 .435 34 9 .250 597 95 43 3.52 Albie Pearson Ken McBride 821,015
1964 82 80 .506 17 5 .242 544 102 49 2.91 Jim Fregosi Dean Chance 760,439
1965 75 87 .463 27 7 .239 527 92 107 3.17 Jim Fregosi Fred Newman 566,727
1966 80 82 .494 18 6 ..232 604 122 80 3.56 Jim Fregosi Dean Chance 1,400,321
1967 84 77 .522 7.5 5 .238 567 114 40 3.19 Don Mincher Minnie Rojas 1,317,713
1968 67 95 .414 36 T-8 .227 498 83 62 3.43 Rick Reichardt George Brunet 1,025,956
1969 71 91 .438 26 3 .230 528 88 54 3.54 Jim Fregosi Andy Messersmith 758,388

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim?
Garret Anderson > L.A. area-bred star dutifully served Angels for 15 years and tops many of the Angels’ all-time offensive categories
Gene Autry > Owner of Angels through their first four decades, helped early migration to Orange County
Nolan Ryan > Unquestioned franchise star of 1970s at apex of career, tossing four no-hitters and setting numerous strikeout records
Mike Scioscia > Long-running pilot has brought unparalleled success to team along with its first and only world title in 2002


1970 86 76 .531 12 3 .251 631 114 69 3.48 Alex Johnson Clyde Wright 1,077,741
1971 76 86 .469 25.5 4 .231 511 96 72 3.10 Ken McMullen Clyde Wright 926,373
1972 75 80 .484 18 5 .242 454 78 57 3.06 Bob Oliver Nolan Ryan 744,190
1973 79 83 .488 15 4 .253 629 93 59 3.53 Frank Robinson Nolan Ryan 1,058,206
1974 68 94 .420 22 6 .254 618 95 119 3.52 Frank Robinson Nolan Ryan 917,269
1975 72 89 .447 25.5 6 .246 628 55 220 3.89 Leroy Stanton Frank Tanana 1,058,163
1976 76 86 .469 14 T-4 .235 550 63 126 3.36 Bruce Bochte Frank Tanana 1,006,774
1977 74 88 .457 28 4 .255 675 131 159 3.72 Bobby Bonds Nolan Ryan 1,432,633
1978 87 75 .537 5 T-2 .259 691 108 86 3.65 Don Baylor Frank Tanana 1,755,386
1979 88 74 .543 --- w 1 .282 866 164 100 4.34 Don Baylor Nolan Ryan 2,523,575
1980 65 96 .406 31 5 .265 698 106 91 4.52 Rod Carew Frank Tanana 2,297,327
1981 51 59 .464 13.5 4/7 .256 476 97 44 3.70 Bobby Grich Ken Forsch 1,441,545
1982 93 69 .574 --- w 1 .274 814 186 55 3.82 Fred Lynn Mike Witt 2,807,360
1983 70 92 .432 29 T-4 .260 722 154 41 4.31 Rod Carew Geoff Zahn 2,555,016
1984 81 81 .500 3 T-2 .249 696 150 80 3.96 Fred Lynn Geoff Zahn 2,402,997
1985 90 72 .556 1 2 .251 732 153 106 3.91 Brian Downing Donnie Moore 2,567,427
1986 92 70 .568 --- w 1 .255 786 167 109 3.84 Brian Downing Mike Witt 2,655,872
1987 75 87 .463 10 T-5 .252 770 172 125 4.38 Wally Joyner Mike Witt 2,696,299
1988 75 87 .463 29 4 .261 714 124 86 4.32 Johnny Ray Mike Witt 2,340,925
1989 91 71 .562 8 3 .256 669 145 89 3.28 Chili Davis Bert Blyleven 2,647,291

Bushers Book
1990 80 82 .494 23 4 .260 690 147 69 3.79 Lance Parrish Chuck Finley 2,555,688
1991 81 81 .500 14 7 .255 653 115 94 3.69 Wally Joyner Jim Abbott 2,416,236
1992 72 90 .444 24 T-5 .243 579 88 160 3.84 Chad Curtis Jim Abbott 2,065,444
1993 71 91 .438 23 T-5 .260 684 115 169 4.34 Tim Salmon Mark Langston 2,057,460
1994 47 68 .409 5.5 4 .264 543 120 65 5.20 Chili Davis Chuck Finley 1,512,622
1995 78 67 .538 1 2 .277 801 186 58 4.52 Tim Salmon Mark Langston 1,748,680
1996 70 91 .435 19.5 4 .276 762 192 53 5.31 Tim Salmon Troy Percival 1,820,521
1997 84 78 .519 6 2 .272 829 161 126 4.52 Tim Salmon Chuck Finley 1,767,330
1998 85 77 .525 3 2 .272 787 147 93 4.49 Tim Salmon Chuck Finley 2,519,280
1999 70 92 .432 25 4 .256 711 158 71 4.79 Mo Vaughn Chuck Finley 2,253,123
2000 82 80 .506 9.5 3 .280 864 236 93 5.00 Darin Erstad Troy Percival 2,066,982
2001 75 87 .463 41 3 .261 691 158 116 4.20 Troy Glaus Troy Percival 2,000,919
2002 99 63 .611 4 !#* 2 .282 851 152 117 3.69 Garret Anderson Jarrod Washburn 2,305,547
2003 77 85 .475 19 3 .268 736 150 129 4.28 Garret Anderson Jarrod Washburn 3,061,094
2004 92 70 .568 --- w 1 .282 836 162 143 4.28 Vladimir Guerrero Kelvim Escobar 3,375,677
2005 95 67 .586 --- w 1 .270 761 147 161 3.68 Vladimir Guerrero Bartolo Colon 3,404,686
2006 89 73 .549 4 2 .274 766 159 148 4.04 Vladimir Guerrero Francisco Rodriguez 3,406,790
2007 94 68 .580 --- w 1 .284 822 123 139 4.23 Vladimir Guerrero John Lackey 3,365,632
2008 100 62 .617 --- w 1 .268 765 159 129 3.99 Vladimir Guerrero Francisco Rodriguez 3,336,747
2009 97 65 .599 --- w 1 .285 883 173 148 4.45 Torii Hunter Jered Weaver 3,240,386
2010 80 82 .494 10 3 .248 681 155 104 4.04 Bobby Abreu Jered Weaver 3,250,814
2011 86 76 .531 10 2 .253 667 155 135 3.57 Howie Kendrick Jered Weaver 3,166,321
2012 89 73 .549 5 3 .274 767 187 134 4.02 Mike Trout Jered Weaver 3,061,770
2013 78 84 .481 18 3 .264 733 164 82 4.23 Mike Trout C.J. Wilson 3,019,505
2014 98 64 .605 1 w 1 .259 773 155 81 3.58 Mike Trout Garrett Richards 3,095,935
2015 85 77 .525 3 3 .246 661 176 52 3.94 Mike Trout Garrett Richards 3,012,765
2016 74 88 .457 21 4 .260 717 156 73 4.28 Mike Trout Matt Shoemaker 3,016,142

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the Angels' History on This Great Game:

1986 baseball history1986: An October for the Ages An unforgettable postseason offers up sensational comebacks and spirited performances; unfortunately for the Angels, it's another heartbreak for their cursed manager, Gene Mauch.


2002 baseball history2002: The Wild, Wild Card West The red-hot Anaheim Angels—riding high on the back of their Rally Monkey—attempt to overcome Barry Bonds and the San Francisco Giants.


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The Angels by the Decade


1960s The first American League franchise on the West Coast, the Angels were given ownership to cowboy movie star Gene Autry, who would run the team for nearly four decades. The Angels rented for four years around Los Angeles (including a three-year stay at Dodger Stadium), before settling into their own home at Anaheim across the freeway from Disneyland. Results-wise, the Angels faired remarkably well compared to the majors’ three other expansion teams of the early 1960s despite a virtual no-name cast of players, three times finishing over the .500 mark.


1970s After a first decade of promise, the Angels regressed into the 1970s as a tin-hitting offense did little to support a terrific line of starting pitchers, led by the sensational Nolan Ryan—who burst on the scene with eye-popping strikeout numbers and four no-hitters after being stolen from the New York Mets. With the reserve clause’s death in the late 1970s, Autry opened his checkbook and brought in numerous star hitters (Don Baylor, Bobby Grich, Rod Carew) to pump up the team’s flagging offense; it led to the Angels’ first postseason appearance in 1979.


1980s The Angels played the role of chronic contenders throughout the decade as they continued to sign on more expensive talent, headlined by Reggie Jackson and Fred Lynn. Twice they made the playoffs, in 1982 and 1986—but suffered crushing defeats in both ALCSs after taking commanding early series leads, leading to more improbable heartbreak for tortured Angel manager Gene Mauch. Attendance rose because of the team’s improved vibe and the expanded capacity of Anaheim Stadium to welcome in the NFL’s Los Angeles Rams.


1990s The bravado of the previous decade-plus slowly faded as the Angels seldom made headway in any pennant race to close out the century; the closest they came was in 1995, when they blew a 13-game lead late in the year and handed Seattle the AL West at season’s end in a tie-breaking contest. However, the nucleus of a better future began to take shape with the debuts of sluggers Tim Salmon, Jim Edmonds, Troy Glaus and Garret Anderson. Anaheim Stadium was reconfigured once again, this time rebuilt back to a baseball-only facility after the Rams left town.


2000s Mike Scioscia took over as the Angels’ manager in 2000 and quickly earned a reputation as one of the majors’ more esteemed pilot, embarking on their best run of success yet—earning six postseason trips in an eight-year stretch. Ironically, the one time the Angels entered the playoffs sans a divisional title—as a wild card in 2002—they surged through October and topped San Francisco in an exciting seven-game World Series for their first-ever championship. Off the field, new owner Arte Moreno sparked controversy by changing the team name to its unusual current calling of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim—enraging local politicos who believed Orange County was being given second-class treatment in the team’s brand.


2010s Building off success, Moreno doubled down and bulked up the roster with big-time free agents Albert Pujols and Josh Hamilton—both of whom largely failed to live up to their whopping contracts, suggesting that their best baseball is behind them. Making up has been the awe-inspiring emergence of super-center fielder Mike Trout—who, barring injury or quick decline, looks poised to become one of the game’s all-time greats.