Kansas City Royals


Ballparks of the Royals
Municipal Stadium (1969-72); Royals Stadium/Kauffman Stadium (1973-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates team record. * - World Series champion. # - American League champion. w - Western Division champion. c - Central Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1969 69 93 .426 28 4 .240 586 98 129 3.72 Joe Foy Wally Bunker 902,414
1970 65 97 .401 33 T-4 .244 611 97 97 3.78 Amos Otis Jim Rooker 693,047
1971 85 76 .528 16 2 .250 603 80 130 3.25 Amos Otis Mike Hedlund 910,784
1972 76 78 .494 16.5 4 .255 580 78 85 3.24 John Mayberry Roger Nelson 707,656
1973 88 74 .543 6 2 .261 755 114 105 4.19 John Mayberry Paul Splittorff 1,345,341
1974 77 85 .475 13 5 .259 667 89 146 3.51 Hal McRae Steve Busby 1,173,292
1975 91 71 .562 7 2 .261 710 118 155 3.47 John Mayberry Steve Busby 1,151,836
1976 90 72 .556 --- w 1 .269 713 65 218 3.21 Hal McRae Al Fitzmorris 1,680,285
1977 102 60 .630 --- w 1 .277 822 146 170 3.52 Hal McRae Dennis Leonard 1,852,603
1978 92 70 .568 --- w 1 .268 743 98 216 3.44 Amos Otis Larry Gura 2,255,493
1979 85 77 .525 3 2 .282 851 116 207 4.45 George Brett Dennis Leonard 2,261,845
1980 97 65 .599 --- #w 1 .286 809 115 185 3.83 George Brett Larry Gura 2,288,714

“George Brett could get good wood on an aspirin.”
—Royals manager Jim Frey


1981 50 53 .485 11 5/1 .267 397 61 100 3.56 George Brett Larry Gura 1,279,403
1982 90 72 .556 3 2 .285 784 132 133 4.08 Hal McRae Dan Quisenberry 2,284,464
1983 79 83 .488 20 2 .271 696 109 182 4.25 George Brett Dan Quisenberry 1,963,875
1984 84 78 .519 --- w 1 .268 673 117 106 3.92 Willie Wilson Bud Black 1,810,018
1985 91 71 .562 --- #*w 1 .252 684 154 128 3.49 George Brett Bret Saberhagen 2,162,717
1986 76 86 .469 16 T-3 .252 654 137 97 3.82 George Brett Danny Jackson 2,320,794
1987 83 79 .512 2 2 .262 715 168 125 3.86 Kevin Seitzer Bret Saberhagen 2,392,471
1988 84 77 .522 19.5 3 .259 704 121 137 3.65 George Brett Mark Gubicza 2,350,181
1989 92 70 .568 7 2 .261 690 101 154 3.55 Bo Jackson Bret Saberhagen 2,477,700
1990 75 86 .466 27.5 6 .267 707 100 107 3.93 George Brett Kevin Appier 2,244,956
1991 82 80 .506 13 6 .264 727 117 119 3.92 Danny Tartabull Bret Saberhagen 2,161,537
1992 72 90 .444 24 T-5 .256 610 75 131 3.81 Gregg Jeffries Kevin Appier 1,867,689
1993 84 78 .519 10 3 .263 675 125 100 4.04 Wally Joyner Kevin Appier 1,934,578
1994 64 51 .557 4 3 .269 574 100 140 4.23 Bob Hamelin David Cone 1,400,494

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the Kansas City Royals?
George Brett > Iconic Royal with 3,000 hits and three batting titles; prime force behind Royals’ two AL pennants to date
Ewing Kauffman > Local magnate who revived Kansas City baseball with expansion Royals and oversaw wise talent growth
Bret Saberhagen > Two-time Cy Young Award winner and breakout star of 1985 world champions
Frank White > Superb second baseman served Royals for nearly 30 years as player, coach and front office employee


1995 70 74 .486 30 2 .260 629 119 120 4.49 Gary Gaetti Kevin Appier 1,233,530
1996 75 86 .466 24 5 .267 746 123 194 4.55 Jose Offerman Kevin Appier 1,435,997
1997 67 94 .416 19 5 .264 747 158 130 4.71 Jeff King Kevin Appier 1,517,638
1998 72 89 .447 16.5 3 .263 714 134 135 5.16 Jose Offerman Tim Belcher 1,494,875
1999 64 97 .398 32.5 4 .282 856 151 127 5.35 Mike Sweeney Jose Rosado 1,506,068
2000 77 85 .475 18 4 .288 879 150 121 5.48 Johnny Damon Mac Suzuki 1,564,847
2001 65 97 .401 26 5 .266 729 152 100 4.87 Carlos Beltran Roberto Hernandez 1,536,371
2002 62 100 .383 32.5 4 .256 737 140 140 5.21 Mike Sweeney Paul Byrd 1,323,036
2003 83 79 .512 7 3 .274 836 162 120 5.06 Carlos Beltran Darrell May 1,779,895
2004 58 104 .358 34 5 .259 720 150 67 5.15 Mike Sweeney Zack Greinke 1,661,478
2005 56 106 .346 43 5 .263 701 126 53 5.49 Emil Brown Mike MacDougal 1,371,181
2006 62 100 .383 34 5 .271 757 124 65 5.65 Emil Brown Mark Redman 1,372,638
2007 69 93 .426 27 5 .261 706 102 78 4.48 David DeJesus Gil Meche 1,616,867
2008 75 87 .463 13.5 4 .269 691 120 79 4.48 David DeJesus Joakim Soria 1,578,922
2009 65 97 .401 21.5 T-4 .259 686 144 88 4.83 Billy Butler Zack Greinke 1,797,891
2010 67 95 .414 27 5 .274 676 121 115 4.97 Billy Butler Joakim Soria 1,615,327
2011 71 91 .438 24 4 .275 730 129 153 4.44 Alex Gordon Bruce Chen 1,724,450
2012 72 90 .444 16 3 .265 676 131 132 4.30 Billy Butler Greg Holland 1,739,859
2013 86 76 .531 7 3 .260 648 112 153 3.45 Eric Hosmer Greg Holland 1,750,754
2014 89 73 .549 1 # ! 2 .263 651 95 153 3.51 Alex Gordon Greg Holland 1,956,482
2015 95 67 .586 --- #*c 1 .269 724 139 104 3.73 Eric Hosmer Wade Davis 2,708,549
2016 81 81 .500 13.5 3 .261 675 147 121 4.21 Eric Hosmer Danny Duffy 2,557,712

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the Royals' History on This Great Game:

1980 baseball history1980: Finally Philly The Royals meet up in the World Series against the long-suffering Philadelphia Phillies following a memorable campaign highlighted by George Brett's quest to become baseball's first .400 hitter since Ted Williams.


1985 baseball history1985: The Missouri Stakes The Royals and St. Louis Cardinals survive tight pennant races and league championship series to meet in an inner-state Fall Classic—the fate of which is determined by one of baseball's most blatant and crucial blown calls.


2015 baseball history2015: A Royal Silencing of the Doubters Perplexed over a lack of respect, the Royals get mad and even by proving the prognosticators wrong with a well-deserved world title.


share this page with a friend Share this page with a friend.

Have a comment, question or request? Contact us at This Great Game.

© 2016 This Great Game.


Bushers Book

The Royals by the Decade


1960s The Royals were born out of the 1967 move of the Kansas City A’s to Oakland, which riled local politicians threatening to take a second look at baseball’s antitrust exemption. The short-term pain would be the absence of K.C. baseball in 1968, but the long-term gain would be new owner Ewing Kauffman, who quickly built up a solid front office and farm system—and would prove to be a far more likeable owner than intolerable A’s lord Charlie Finley. The new team name, Royals—chosen out of a contest of 17,000 entries—was derived from the town’s popular livestock event, the American Royal.


1970s Earning quick respect, the Royals shed their infant losing ways after just two years and emerged as a viable contender; sparkling new Royals Stadium—the lone baseball-only facility constructed between 1962 and 1991—complimented the team’s kinetic collection of offensive talent, led by George Brett, Amos Otis and Hal McRae, with its artificial turf and spacious dimensions. As the A’s dynasty crashed in the mid-1970s, the Royals took over—winning three straight AL West titles, only to lose each time in the ALCS to the New York Yankees.


1980s The Royals had a memorable start to the decade, experiencing Brett’s flirtation with .400 while finally tearing the ALCS monkey off their back with a sweep of the Yankees. They won the pennant again in 1985, this time earning their only world title to date with a controversial seven-game triumph over cross-state rival St. Louis behind the remarkable pitching of 21-year-old Bret Saberhagen. The brief sensation that was the powerful, multi-sport Bo Jackson highlighted the late 1980s, though he brought no postseason activity to Kansas City.


1990s Lean times slowly took over as the veterans of lore faded out; making matters worse, baseball’s intensified obsession with amassing team revenues through new ballparks and television deals left small-market Kansas City increasingly behind in the financial rat race. Still, the Royals held their own as best they could despite the lack of a new wave of offensive talent to match the glory of the 1970s. The pitching remained solid thanks to the year-in, year-out efforts of Kevin Appier and (more briefly) closer Jeff Montgomery.


2000s Despite the long-overdue influx of stellar bats in the lineup (including Carlos Beltran, Mike Sweeney, Raul Ibanez and Johnny Damon), the Royals were frequently crashing and burning in the standings, losing 100-plus games four times during the decade while managing just one winning season in 2003 when, through some strange anomaly, the Royals forged a 83-79 record in between two 100-loss campaigns. There at least was improvement in the architectural sphere when, in 2009, Royals Stadium (now renamed Kauffman Stadium) was given a major makeover.


2010s Through their vaunted minor league system, the Royals began the decade aggressively building from within; the bats in place, the pitching followed and by mid-decade a long overdue run of success ensued with back-to-back AL pennants—the latter of which was capped by their first world title in three decades, using feisty hitting, opportunistic baserunning and a lights-out bullpen to disassemble the New York Mets in five games at the 2015 World Series.