Houston Astros

Known as the Houston Colt .45s, 1962-64


Ballparks of the Astros
Colt Stadium (1962-64); Astrodome (1965-1999); Enron Field/Minute Maid Park (2000-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates team record. * - World Series champion. # - National League champion. w - Western Division champion. c - Central Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1962 64 96 .400 36.5 8 .246 592 105 42 3.83 Roman Mejias Turk Farrell 924,456
1963 66 96 .407 33 9 .220 464 62 39 3.44 Carl Warwick Ken Johnson 719,502
1964 66 96 .407 27 9 .229 495 70 40 3.41 Walt Bond Bob Bruce 725,773
1965 65 97 .401 32 9 .237 569 97 90 3.84 Jim Wynn Turk Farrell 2,151,470
1966 72 90 .444 23 8 .255 612 112 90 3.76 Rusty Staub Mike Cuellar 1,872,108
1967 69 93 .426 32.5 9 .249 626 93 88 4.03 Jim Wynn Mike Cuellar 1,348,303
1968 72 90 .444 25 10 .231 510 66 44 3.26 Jim Wynn Mike Cuellar 1,312,887
1969 81 81 .500 12 5 .240 676 104 101 3.60 Jim Wynn Larry Dierker 1,442,995

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the Houston Astros?
Jeff Bagwell > Thunderous slugger who thrilled Astros fans with impressive output throughout the 1990s
Craig Biggio > Bagwell’s faithful sidekick, one of the game’s great tablesetters and member of the 3,000-hit club
Roy Hofheinz > Driving force behind both the expansion of baseball to Houston and the futuristic Astrodome
J.R. Richard > Dominant, intimidating fireballer whose possible path to Cooperstown was derailed in mid-career by a major stroke


1970 79 83 .488 23 4 .259 744 129 114 4.23 Jim Wynn Larry Dierker 1,253,444
1971 79 83 .488 11 T-4 .240 585 71 101 3.13 Joe Morgan Don Wilson 1,261,589
1972 84 69 .549 10.5 2 .258 708 134 111 3.75 Cesar Cedeno Don Wilson 1,469,247
1973 82 80 .506 17 4 .251 681 134 92 3.75 Cesar Cedeno Dave Roberts 1,394,004
1974 81 81 .500 21 4 .263 653 110 108 3.46 Cesar Cedeno Larry Dierker 1,090,728
1975 64 97 .398 43.5 6 .254 664 84 133 4.04 Cesar Cedeno Larry Dierker 858,002
1976 80 82 .494 22 3 .256 625 66 150 3.56 Cesar Cedeno J.R. Richard 886,146
1977 81 81 .500 17 3 .254 680 114 187 3.54 Cesar Cedeno J.R. Richard 1,109,560
1978 74 88 .457 21 5 .258 605 70 178 3.63 Jose Cruz J.R. Richard 1,126,145
1979 89 73 .549 1.5 2 .256 583 49 190 3.20 Jose Cruz J.R. Richard 1,900,312

“They look like Hawaiian softball uniforms.”
—Pitcher Charlie Hough on the Astros’ multi-striped, multi-colored uniforms of the 1970s and 1980s


1980 93 70 .571 --- w 1 .261 637 75 194 3.10 Jose Cruz Joe Niekro 2,278,217
1981 61 49 .555 6 3/1 .257 394 45 81 2.66 Jose Cruz Nolan Ryan 1,321,282
1982 77 85 .475 12 5 .247 569 74 140 3.42 Phil Garner Joe Niekro 1,558,555
1983 85 77 .525 6 3 .257 643 97 164 3.45 Jose Cruz Nolan Ryan 1,351,962
1984 80 82 .494 12.5 T-2 .264 693 79 105 3.32 Jose Cruz Joe Niekro 1,229,862
1985 83 79 .512 12 T-3 .261 706 121 96 3.66 Bill Doran Mike Scott 1,184,314
1986 96 66 .593 --- w 1 .255 654 125 163 3.15 Glenn Davis Mike Scott 1,734,276
1987 76 86 .469 14 3 .253 648 122 162 3.84 Billy Hatcher Mike Scott 1,909,902
1988 82 80 .506 12.5 5 .244 617 96 198 3.41 Glenn Davis Mike Scott 1,933,505
1989 86 76 .531 6 3 .239 647 97 144 3.64 Glenn Davis Mike Scott 1,834,908
1990 75 87 .463 16 T-4 .242 573 94 179 3.61 Franklin Stubbs Danny Darwin 1,310,927
1991 65 97 .401 29 6 .244 605 79 125 4.00 Jeff Bagwell Pete Harnisch 1,196,152
1992 81 81 .500 17 4 .246 608 96 139 3.72 Jeff Bagwell Doug Jones 1,211,412
1993 85 77 .525 19 3 .267 716 138 103 3.49 Jeff Bagwell Mark Portugal 2,084,618
1994 66 49 .574 0.5 2 .278 602 120 124 3.97 Jeff Bagwell Doug Drabek 1,561,136
1995 76 68 .528 9 2 .275 747 109 176 4.06 Craig Biggio Mike Hampton 1,363,801
1996 82 80 .506 6 2 .262 753 129 180 4.38 Jeff Bagwell Shane Reynolds 1,975,888
1997 84 78 .519 --- c 1 .259 777 133 171 3.67 Jeff Bagwell Darryl Kile 2,046,781
1998 102 60 .630 --- c 1 .280 874 166 155 3.50 Jeff Bagwell Shane Reynolds 2,458,451
1999 97 65 .599 --- c 1 .267 823 168 166 3.84 Jeff Bagwell Mike Hampton 2,706,017
2000 72 90 .444 23 4 .278 938 249 114 5.41 Jeff Bagwell Scott Elarton 3,056,139
2001 93 69 .574 --- c 1 .271 847 208 64 4.37 Jeff Bagwell Wade Miller 2,904,277

Bushers Book
2002 84 78 .519 13 2 .262 749 167 71 4.00 Lance Berkman Roy Oswalt 2,517,537
2003 87 75 .537 1 2 .263 805 191 66 3.86 Richard Hildago Billy Wagner 2,454,241
2004 92 70 .568 13 ! 2 .267 803 187 89 4.05 Lance Berkman Roger Clemens 3,087,872
2005 89 73 .549 11 !# 2 .256 693 161 115 3.51 Morgan Ensberg Andy Pettitte 2,804,760
2006 82 80 .506 1.5 2 .255 735 174 79 4.08 Lance Berkman Roy Oswalt 3,022,763
2007 73 89 .451 12 4 .260 723 167 65 4.68 Carlos Lee Roy Oswalt 3,020,405
2008 86 75 .534 11 3 .263 712 167 114 4.36 Lance Berkman Jose Valverde 2,779,487
2009 74 88 .457 17 5 .260 643 142 113 4.54 Lance Berkman Wandy Rodriguez 2,521,076
2010 76 86 .469 15 4 .247 611 108 100 4.09 Hunter Pence Brett Myers 2,331,490
2011 56 106 .346 40 6 .258 615 95 118 4.51 Carlos Lee Mark Melancon 2,067,016
2012 55 107 .340 42 6 .236 583 146 105 4.56 Jose Altuve Lucas Harrell 1,607,733
2013 51 111 .315 45 5 .240 610 148 110 4.79 Jason Castro Bud Norris 1,651,883
2014 70 92 .432 29 4 .242 629 163 122 4.11 Jose Altuve Dallas Keuchel 1,751,829
2015 86 76 .531 2 ! 2 .250 729 230 121 3.57 Jose Altuve Dallas Keuchel 2,153,585
2016 84 78 .519 11 3 .247 724 198 102 4.06 Jose Altuve Colin McHugh 2,306,623

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the Astros' History on This Great Game:

1986 baseball history1986: An October for the Ages Behind the untouchable split-finger fastball of Mike Scott, the Astros take part in an unforgettable postseason full of sensational comebacks and spirited performances.


2005 baseball history2005: At the End of the Primrose Path In a year dominated by steroids talk, the Astros charge from a horrible start and capture their first-ever National League pennant before meeting their match in the Chicago White Sox at the World Series.


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The Astros by the Decade


1960s Originally named the Colt .45s, the franchise began playing in a temporary ballpark that housed few fans but many killer mosquitoes in concert with oppressive heat and humidity; a move to the space-age, air-conditioned Astrodome in 1965 generated a huge buzz and increased attendance, but the rebranded Astros remained the same team on the field: A second-division straggler with moments of sterling pitching but a serious deficit of hitting, despite the emerging (but mostly raw) talents of Jim Wynn, Joe Morgan and Rusty Staub.


1970s The Astros evolved into a more competitive, yet not necessarily contending, organization, often finishing at or just around the .500 mark. If their play didn’t get people’s attention, their uniforms sure did; in 1975, the Astros began wearing a horizontally bright mix of warm colors on the bottom half of their jersey tops, initiating a fashion revolution in the majors. The team’s stars of the decade were almost as flashy, from dynamic outfielders Cesar Cedeno and Jose Cruz to the wild fastball theatrics of 6’8” J.R. Richard.


1980s Further improving, the Astros got their first taste of the postseason, twice winning the NL West—but succumbing both times in the NLCS (to the Phillies in 1980, the Mets in 1986) in remarkably tight, entertaining and ultimately heartbreaking efforts. Singles and speed continued to be the team’s offensive mantra, with only Glenn Davis arriving as a legitimate power threat late in the decade; the rotation was superb, anchored by Nolan Ryan, Joe Niekro and, later in the decade, dominant split-finger ace Mike Scott.


1990s The team’s final decade in the Astrodome was sweetened by the arrival of two offensive forces who seemed inseparable from one another: Intimidating free swinger Jeff Bagwell and the fast, amiable but tough-as-nails Craig Biggio. The Astros followed up three second-place finishes in the mid-1990s with three NL Central crowns to finish the decade—but were flattened out each time in the first round, dropping their all-time postseason series record to 0-6.


2000s The Astros moved into lovely new Minute Maid Park (originally named Enron Field) in 2000 and continued their winning ways, with Lance Berkman joining the “Killer B” tandem of Bagwell and Biggio while Roy Oswalt emerged as a tenacious ace on the mound, complemented by interim tours from Roger Clemens and Andy Pettitte. The team’s upswing peaked in 2005 when it survived a 15-30 start, took the wild card spot and rammed its way to its first-ever World Series—where it got swept by the Chicago White Sox. From there, the Astros gradually regressed, failing to reload new talent for the future.


2010s Increasingly lifeless, the Astros appeared burned out under owner Drayton McLane, who sold the team in 2011. New lord Jim Crane all but started from scratch (and in a new circuit, as MLB ordered a relocation to the American League), overseeing three straight 100-loss seasons before an impressive rebound led them to the postseason in 2015 behind a lineup of unapologetic hit-or-miss swingers, short but dynamic second baseman Jose Altuve and a homegrown ace in Dallas Keuchel.