Detroit Tigers


Ballparks of the Tigers
Bennett Park (1901-1911); Navin Field/Briggs Stadium/Tiger Stadium (1912-99); Comerica Park (2000-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates team record. * - World Series champion. # - American League champion. e - Eastern Division champion. c - Central Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1901 74 61 .548 8.5 3 .279 741 27 204 3.30 Kid Elberfeld Roscoe Miller 259,430
1902 52 83 .385 30.7 7 .251 566 22 130 3.56 Jimmy Barrett Ed Siever 189,469
1903 65 71 .478 25 5 .268 567 12 128 2.75 Sam Crawford Bill Donovan 224,523
1904 62 90 .408 32 7 .231 505 11 112 2.77 Sam Crawford George Mullin 177,796
1905 79 74 .516 15.5 3 .243 512 13 129 2.83 Sam Crawford Ed Killian 193,384
1906 71 78 .477 21 6 .242 518 10 206 3.06 Sam Crawford George Mullin 174,043
1907 92 58 .613 --- #1 .266 693 11 196 2.33 Ty Cobb Ed Killian 297,079
1908 90 63 .588 --- #1 .263 647 19 165 2.40 Ty Cobb Ed Summers 436,199
1909 98 54 .645 --- #1 .267 666 19 280 2.26 Ty Cobb George Mullin 490,490
1910 86 68 .558 18 3 .261 679 28 249 2.82 Ty Cobb George Mullin 391,288
1911 89 65 .578 13.5 2 .292 831 30 276 3.73 Ty Cobb George Mullin 484,988
1912 69 84 .451 36.5 6 .268 720 19 277 3.77 Ty Cobb Jean Dubuc 402,870
1913 66 87 .431 30 6 .265 625 24 218 3.38 Ty Cobb Jean Dubuc 398,502
1914 80 73 .523 19.5 4 .258 615 25 211 2.86 Ty Cobb Harry Coveleski 416,225
1915 100 54 .649 2.5 2 .268 778 23 241 2.86 Ty Cobb Harry Coveleski 476,105
1916 87 67 .565 4 3 .264 670 17 190 2.97 Ty Cobb Harry Coveleski 616,772
1917 78 75 .510 21.5 4 .259 639 25 163 2.56 Ty Cobb Hooks Dauss 457,289
1918 55 71 .437 20 7 .249 476 13 123 3.40 Ty Cobb Bernie Boland 203,719

“When I began playing the game, baseball was about as sentimental as a kick in the crotch.”
—Ty Cobb


1919 80 60 .571 8 4 .283 618 23 121 3.30 Bobby Veach Hooks Dauss 643,805
1920 61 93 .396 37 7 .270 652 30 76 4.04 Bobby Veach Doc Ayers 579,650
1921 71 82 .464 27 6 .316 883 58 95 4.40 Ty Cobb Dutch Leonard 661,527
1922 79 75 .513 15 3 .306 828 54 78 4.27 Ty Cobb Herman Pillette 861,206
1923 83 71 .539 16 2 .300 831 41 87 4.09 Harry Heilmann Hooks Dauss 911,377
1924 86 68 .558 6 3 .298 849 35 100 4.19 Harry Heilmann Rip Collins 1,015,136
1925 81 73 .526 16.5 4 .302 903 50 97 4.61 Harry Heilmann Hooks Dauss 820,766
1926 79 75 .513 12 6 .291 793 36 88 4.41 Harry Heilmann Sam Gibson 711,914
1927 82 71 .536 27.5 4 .289 845 51 139 4.14 Harry Heilmann Earl Whitehill 773,716
1928 68 86 .442 33 6 .279 744 62 113 4.32 Harry Heilmann Ownie Carroll 474,323
1929 70 84 .455 36 6 .299 926 110 95 4.96 Dale Alexander George Uhle 869,318
1930 75 79 .487 27 5 .284 783 82 98 4.70 Charlie Gehringer Vic Sorrell 649,450
1931 61 93 .396 47 7 .268 651 43 117 4.59 John Stone George Uhle 434,056
1932 76 75 .503 29.5 5 .273 799 80 103 4.30 Charlie Gehringer Vic Sorrell 397,157
1933 75 79 .487 25 5 .269 722 57 68 3.95 Charlie Gehringer Firpo Marberry 320,972
1934 101 53 .656 --- #1 .300 958 74 125 4.06 Hank Greenberg Schoolboy Rowe 919,161
1935 93 58 .616 --- #*1 .290 919 106 70 3.82 Hank Greenberg Schoolboy Rowe 1,034,929
1936 83 71 .539 19.5 2 .300 921 94 73 5.00 Charlie Gehringer Tommy Bridges 875,948
1937 89 65 .578 13 2 .292 935 150 89 4.87 Hank Greenberg Eldon Auker 1,072,276
1938 84 70 .545 16 4 .272 862 137 76 4.79 Hank Greenberg George Gill 799,557
1939 81 73 .526 26.5 5 .279 849 124 88 4.29 Hank Greenberg Tommy Bridges 836,279
1940 90 64 .584 --- #1 .286 888 134 66 4.01 Hank Greenberg Bobo Newsom 1,112,693

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the Detroit Tigers?
Ty Cobb > Fiery, hot-tempered legend who holds game’s highest career batting average (.367)
Hank Greenberg > Lanky, imposing and astute slugger who powered winning Tiger teams of 1930s and 1940s
Ernie Harwell > Popular play-by-play voice of the Tigers from 1960-2002
Al Kaline > Over 3,000 hits in memorable span of 22 seasons; franchise leader in few offensive categories not owned by Cobb


1941 75 79 .487 28 T-4 .263 686 81 43 4.18 Rudy York Al Benton 684,915
1942 73 81 .474 30 5 .246 589 76 39 3.13 Rudy York Hal Newhouser 580,087
1943 78 76 .506 20 5 .261 632 77 40 3.00 Rudy York Dizzy Trout 606,287
1944 88 66 .571 1 2 .263 658 60 61 3.09 Rudy York Dizzy Trout 923,176
1945 88 65 .575 --- #*1 .256 633 77 60 2.99 Rudy York Hal Newhouser 1,280,341
1946 92 62 .597 12 2 .258 704 108 65 3.22 Hank Greenberg Hal Newhouser 1,722,590
1947 85 69 .552 12 2 .258 714 103 52 3.57 George Kell Hal Newhouser 1,398,093
1948 78 76 .506 18.5 5 .267 700 78 22 4.15 Pat Mullin Hal Newhouser 1,743,035
1949 87 67 .565 10 4 .267 751 88 39 3.77 Vic Wertz Virgil Trucks 1,821,204
1950 95 59 .617 3 2 .282 837 114 23 4.12 Vic Wertz Art Houtteman 1,951,474
1951 73 81 .474 25 5 .265 685 104 37 4.29 Vic Wertz Fred Hutchinson 1,132,641
1952 50 104 .325 45 8 .243 557 103 27 4.25 Walt Dropo Ted Gray 1,026,846
1953 60 94 .390 40.5 6 .266 695 108 30 5.25 Harvey Kuenn Ned Garver 884,658
1954 68 86 .442 43 5 .258 584 90 48 3.81 Ray Boone Ned Garver 1,079,847
1955 79 75 .513 17 5 .266 775 130 41 3.79 Al Kaline Billy Hoeft 1,181,838
1956 82 72 .532 15 5 .279 789 150 43 4.06 Al Kaline Frank Lary 1,051,182
1957 78 76 .506 20 4 .257 614 116 36 3.56 Al Kaline Jim Bunning 1,272,346
1958 77 77 .500 15 5 .266 659 109 48 3.59 Al Kaline Frank Lary 1,098,924
1959 76 78 .494 18 4 .258 713 160 34 4.20 Al Kaline Don Mossi 1,221,221
1960 71 83 .461 26 6 .239 633 150 66 3.64 Al Kaline Jim Bunning 1,167,669
1961 101 61 .623 8 2 .266 841 180 98 3.55 Norm Cash Frank Lary 1,600,710
1962 85 76 .528 10.5 4 .248 758 209 69 3.81 Rocky Colavito Hank Aguirre 1,207,881
1963 79 83 .488 20.5 T-5 .252 700 148 73 3.90 Rocky Colavito Hank Aguirre 821,952
1964 85 77 .525 14 4 .253 699 157 60 3.84 Al Kaline Mickey Lolich 816,139
1965 89 73 .549 13 4 .238 680 162 57 3.35 Norm Cash Denny McLain 1,029,645
1966 88 74 .543 10 3 .251 719 179 41 3.85 Al Klaine Denny McLain 1,124,293
1967 91 71 .562 1 T-2 .243 683 152 37 3.32 Al Kaline Earl Wilson 1,447,143
1968 103 59 .636 --- #*1 .235 671 185 26 2.71 Willie Horton Denny McLain 2,031,847
1969 90 72 .556 19 2 .242 701 182 35 3.31 Jim Northrup Denny McLain 1,577,481
1970 79 83 .488 29 4 .238 666 148 29 4.09 Jim Northrup Mickey Lolich 1,501,293
1971 91 71 .562 12 2 .254 701 179 35 3.63 Norm Cash Mickey Lolich 1,591,073
1972 86 70 .551 --- e 1 .237 558 122 17 2.96 Norm Cash Mickey Lolich 1,892,386
1973 85 77 .525 12 3 .254 642 157 28 3.90 Mickey Stanley John Hiller 1,724,146
1974 72 90 .444 19 6 .247 620 131 67 4.16 Al Kaline Joe Coleman 1,243,080
1975 57 102 .358 37.5 6 .249 570 125 63 4.27 Willie Horton John Hiller 1,058,836
1976 74 87 .460 24 5 .257 609 101 107 3.87 Rusty Staub Mark Fidrych 1,467,020
1977 74 88 .457 26 4 .264 714 166 60 4.13 Ron LeFlore Dave Rozema 1,359,856
1978 86 76 .531 13.5 5 .271 714 129 90 3.64 Ron LeFlore Dave Rozema 1,714,893
1979 85 76 .528 18 5 .269 770 164 176 4.27 Steve Kemp Aurelio Lopez 1,630,929

Bushers Book
1980 84 78 .519 19 5 .273 830 143 75 4.25 Steve Kemp Aurelio Lopez 1,785,293
1981 60 49 .550 2 4/T-2 .256 427 65 61 3.53 Steve Kemp Jack Morris 1,149,144
1982 83 79 .512 12 4 .266 729 177 93 3.80 Lance Parrish Dan Petry 1,636,058
1983 92 70 .568 6 2 .274 789 156 93 3.80 Lou Whitaker Jack Morris 1,829,636
1984 104 58 .642 --- #*e 1 .271 829 187 106 3.49 Kirk Gibson Willie Hernandez 2,704,794
1985 84 77 .522 15 3 .253 729 202 75 3.78 Kirk Gibson Dan Petry 2,286,609
1986 87 75 .537 8.5 2 .263 798 198 138 4.02 Kirk Gibson Jack Morris 1,899,437
1987 98 64 .605 --- e 1 .272 896 225 106 4.02 Alan Trammell Jack Morris 2,061,830
1988 88 74 .543 1 2 .250 703 143 87 3.71 Alan Trammell Jeff Robinson 2,081,162
1989 59 103 .364 30 7 .242 617 116 103 4.53 Lou Whitaker Frank Tanana 1,543,656
1990 79 83 .488 9 3 .259 750 172 82 4.39 Cecil Fielder Mike Henneman 1,495,785
1991 84 78 .519 7 T-2 .247 817 209 109 4.51 Lou Whitaker Bill Gullickson 1,641,661
1992 75 87 .463 21 6 .256 791 182 66 4.60 Tony Phillips Bill Gullickson 1,423,923
1993 85 77 .525 10 T-3 .275 899 178 104 4.65 Travis Fryman Mike Henneman 1,971,421
1994 53 62 .461 18 5 .265 652 161 46 5.38 Kirk Gibson Joe Boever 1,184,783
1995 60 84 .417 26 4 .247 654 159 73 5.49 Chad Curtis David Wells 1,180,979
1996 53 109 .327 39 5 .256 783 204 87 6.38 Bobby Higginson Felipe Lira 1,168,610
1997 79 83 .488 19 3 .258 784 176 161 4.56 Tony Clark Justin Thompson 1,365,157
1998 65 97 .401 24 5 .264 722 165 122 4.93 Tony Clark Justin Thompson 1,409,391
1999 69 92 .429 27.5 3 .261 747 212 108 5.18 Dean Palmer Dave Mlicki 2,026,441
2000 79 83 .488 16 3 .275 823 177 83 4.71 Bobby Higginson Todd Jones 2,438,617
2001 66 96 .407 25 4 .260 724 139 133 5.01 Bobby Higginson Steve Sparks 1,921,305
2002 55 106 .342 39 5 .248 575 124 65 4.93 Randall SImon Juan Acevedo 1,503,625
2003 43 119 .265 47 5 .240 591 153 98 5.30 Dmitri Young Nate Cornejo 1,368,245
2004 72 90 .444 20 4 .272 827 201 86 4.93 Carlos Guillen Mike Maroth 1,917,004
2005 71 91 .438 28 4 .272 723 168 66 4.51 Craig Monroe Mike Maroth 2,024,431
2006 95 67 .586 1 ! #2 .274 822 203 60 3.84 Carlos Guillen Kenny Rogers 2,595,937
2007 88 74 .543 8 2 .287 887 177 103 4.57 Magglio Ordonez Justin Verlander 3,047,133
2008 74 88 .457 14.5 5 .271 821 200 63 4.90 Miguel Cabrera Armando Galarraga 3,202,645
2009 86 77 .528 1 2 .260 743 183 72 4.29 Miguel Cabrera Justin Verlander 2,567,165
2010 81 81 .500 13 3 .268 751 152 69 4.30 Miguel Cabrera Justin Verlander 2,461,237
2011 95 67 .586 --- c 1 .277 787 169 49 4.04 Miguel Cabrera Justin Verlander 2,642,045
2012 88 74 .543 --- c #1 .268 726 163 59 3.75 Miguel Cabrera Justin Verlander 3,028,033
2013 93 69 .574 --- c 1 .283 796 176 35 3.61 Miguel Cabrera Max Scherzer 3,083,397
2014 90 72 .556 --- c 1 .277 757 155 106 4.01 Victor Martinez Max Scherzer 2,917,209
2015 74 87 .460 20.5 5 .270 689 151 83 4.64 J.D. Martinez David Price 2,726,048

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the Tigers' History on This Great Game:

1907 baseball history1907: Cultivation of a Georgia Peach Angrier than life, Ty Cobb comes of age and delivers the Detroit Tigers with their first pennant.


1909 baseball history1909: Three-Beat Sudden ace Babe Adams of the Pittsburgh Pirates stifles the Detroit Tigers into their third straight World Series loss.


1910 baseball history1910: A Carload of Trouble The World Series becomes anticlimactic following a strange and controversial ending to the individual batting race between two of baseball's premier hitters: The Tigers' Ty Cobb and Cleveland's Nap Lajoie.


1935 baseball history1935: The Babe's Bittersweet Bow Out In Babe Ruth's final season as a player, the Tigers take advantage of the vacuum left by his decline at New York and tackle the Chicago Cubs in their latest attempt to finally win a World Series.


1940 baseball history1940: Victorious Healings The Tigers and Cincinnati Reds, two teams coping with personal loss, dedicate themselves toward winning a World Series title.


1945 baseball history1945: Hank's Heroic Rescue As World War II comes to an end, Hank Greenberg makes the first and most celebrated return to baseball.


1968 baseball history1968: Year of the Pitcher The side effects of the increased strike zone reach epidemic proportions as amazing pitching feats abound everywhere—and become the centerpiece for a memorable seven-game World Series between the Tigers and St. Louis Cardinals.


1984 baseball history1984: The Roar of a Powerhouse The Detroit Tigers bolt out to a 35-5 record and coast from their to their first World Series title since 1968.


2006 baseball history2006: Two Reluctant Enemies Best of friends, Tony La Russa and Jim Leyland overcome various hurdles and face off against one another in October.


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The Tigers by the Decade


1900s The Tigers got off to a rough start both on the field and at the gate, with strong conversation by mid-decade that the franchise would be relocated to Buffalo. But that all changed when the town awoke and embraced the Tigers with the arrival of Ty Cobb, whose ultra-angry demeanor and aggressive, world-class hitting skills propelled Detroit to three straight American League pennants—but no championships, as the Tigers fell flat all three times at the World Series.


1910s As Cobb went, so went the Tigers; the perennial hitting champ constantly made news, often in the worst way—engaging in fistfights with teammates, opponents, fans and everyday people outside the ballpark who somehow incurred his volcanic wrath. Even with Cobb at peak form (on the field, as well as off it), Detroit went pennantless for the decade, despite a 100-win campaign in 1915 that fell shy of first place by 2.5 games. The 1912 opening of Navin Field (later to be renamed Tiger Stadium) would dutifully serve as the team’s home for the rest of the century.


1920s The Tigers could sure hit—as did most baseball teams in the 1920s with the explosion in offense—but Detroit’s bats were especially robust thanks to a superior lineup bolstered by Harry Heilmann and an aging yet still dangerous Cobb; the Tigers’ .316 team average in 1921 still ranks as the highest in AL history. But the Tigers seldom fought for the top as languid pitching offset the crackling offense and kept the team saddled around the .500 mark. Cobb served as the team’s manager through 1926, when allegations (but no hard evidence) of his involvement in game-fixing back in 1919 forced him to relinquish his duties.


1930s A five-year malaise was shattered in 1934 when catcher Mickey Cochrane was exiled from Philadelphia, took over the Tigers’ managerial duties and shot Detroit back to winning form with two consecutive pennants in 1934-35—including, at last, its first World Series title in 1935 just weeks before long-time owner Frank Navin died. Not surprisingly, offense was behind the Tigers’ return to the top with “Mechanical Man” Charlie Gehringer and towering slugger Hank Greenberg contributing with phenomenal numbers.


1940s After another pennant in 1940 led to an emotional World Series loss to Cincinnati, the Tigers slipped to middling status during World War II with many star players—most notably Greenberg—absent to aid the war effort. Exceptional pitching led by Hal Newhouser and Dizzy Trout emerged during the war and, along with the early return of Greenberg midway through 1945, gave the Tigers an exciting AL pennant and seven-game Fall Classic triumph over the Chicago Cubs. Newhouser continued to rule the mound in the immediate postwar years, but Greenberg’s decline and trade to Pittsburgh signaled the end of an era—and the start of a lesser one.


1950s The Tigers imploded early in the decade, bottoming out with 104 losses in 1952—then revived back to respectability with the maturing of outfielder Harvey Kuenn, a young Al Kaline (who became the majors’ youngest-ever hitting champ at age 20 in 1955) and prosperous pitching toward the end of the 1950s with Jim Bunning and Frank Lary taking hold atop the rotation. But the Tigers never made any move for the pennant, frequently and maddeningly trailing the same three teams: The New York Yankees, Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox.


1960s In a decade where Ty Cobb was sorely needed, the Tigers (.247 average for the 1960s) made up for undisciplined hitting with stark power, starting with Norm Cash’s monster 1961 season and later with a batch of guys (Willie Horton, Jim Northrup, Bill Freehan) contributing just north of 20 homers a year. Despite a decade-low .235 average in 1968, the Tigers won 103 games—31 from colorful and controversial ace Denny McLain, the majors’ last 30-game winner—and outlasted the Cardinals in a feisty seven-game World Series.


1970s The Tigers managed one more postseason appearance in 1972 before fading into rebuild mode—a movement that most notably yielded the loyal and exemplary middle infield duo of Lou Whitaker and Alan Trammell, who would team together for 19 straight years in Detroit. The unquestioned highlight of the decade belonged to flamboyant one-year wonder Mark Fidrych, whose long curly hair, on-mound theatrics and pitching excellence captivated both Detroit and the nation in 1976.


1980s Detroit lucked into ex-Cincinnati manager Sparky Anderson, who gradually nurtured the Tigers to championship form in 1984 with one of the game’s most dominant campaigns—sprinting out to 35-5 start, overwhelming the AL East competition and breezing through the postseason for a made-to-order world title behind the spirited leadership of outfielder Kirk Gibson and closer Willie Hernandez. A dynasty was not in the cards, however; the Tigers stayed solid but made just one more playoff appearance in 1987, being upset at the ALCS by Minnesota.


1990s Gripping it and ripping it was the name of the game to start Tiger Stadium’s final decade in operation as an undisciplined yet potent Detroit roster heavy on home runs, walks and strikeouts dictated success and failure; more than not, it was the latter. Cecil Fielder’s 51 homers in 1990—the first 50+ effort by an American Leaguer in 29 years—presaged the booming decade to come for baseball in general. Thoroughly lackluster Tiger pitching hit a historic rock bottom in 1996 by posting an AL record-worst 6.38 earned run average.


2000s Comerica Park ushered in the new century, infuriating hitters who detested its expansive outfield before the Tigers modified the dimensions. The new ballpark failed to give Detroit an upward bump in the standings; on the contrary, the Tigers sank all the way to 119 losses in 2003 to set an AL record. From the ashes of that disaster, veteran manager Jim Leyland took over and, as he did in Pittsburgh, turned a lost franchise completely around with an AL pennant just three years later.


2010s The momentum accelerated into the 2010s as the Tigers took four straight divisional titles (their first since the 1980s), one leading to a second pennant under Leyland in 2012. During this stretch, Detroit cornered the market on MVPs, with ace pitcher Justin Verlander being awarded in 2011 followed by back-to-back honors for Miguel Cabrera—who, in 2012, also became the game’s first triple-crown winner since 1967.


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