This Great Game Comebacker

The Week That Was in Baseball: May 20-26, 2013
The Curse of the World Baseball Classic? The Yankees Try on Soccer Cleats
Why Miami is "Super" Ticked Off at Jeffrey Loria More Bad Umpiring

Best and Worst of the Week

BEST HITTER, AMERICAN LEAGUE
Mike Trout, Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim

AB
R
H
2B
3B
HR
RBI
BB
IB
HB
SB
26 10 12 1 2 2 7 2 0 0 4

After a modest start to the season—modest, that is, in relation to last year’s jaw-dropping, breakout effort—the 22-year-old returned to white-hot territory this past week as he helped ignite the Angels from an extended season-opening funk into a long, unbeaten run. Trout was doing it all: Getting on base, hitting for power, and stealing bases at will. Pace it all out, and here’s where Trout is headed to finish 2013: A .302 average, 126 runs, 42 doubles, 16 triples, 32 homers, 117 RBIs and 39 steals. Wow.


BEST HITTER, NATIONAL LEAGUE
Joey Votto, Cincinnati Reds

AB
R
H
2B
3B
HR
RBI
BB
IB
HB
SB
21 8 8 0 0 2 3 3 3 0 0

You can neutralize his power a little bit, but you can’t keep the Toronto native off the basepaths. Votto did conk out two homers, but loaded on top of that were a bunch of singles and walks that kept the big guy atop the NL charts for walks, batting average and on-base percentage. All this has also led to a bunch of runs for the Reds, 14 alone scored by Votto in a nine-game stretch that ended Saturday.


WORST HITTER, AMERICAN LEAGUE
Adam Rosales, Oakland A's

AB
R
H
2B
3B
HR
RBI
BB
IB
HB
SB
18 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0

The guy who was robbed of a home run by blind replay officials a few weeks back in Cleveland couldn’t buy or bribe his way to even a single this past week, going hitless even as the A’s successfully rolled through the Lone Star State. Rosales has been getting more playing time at second base because Eric Sogard’s hitting had gone south, but this is threatening to go all the way to the South Pole.


WORST HITTER, NATIONAL LEAGUE
Russell Martin, Pittsburgh Pirates

AB
R
H
2B
3B
HR
RBI
BB
IB
HB
SB
14 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

Granted, he only played four games this past week and he’s a catcher, but there simply was no one worse in the NL at the plate. Martin saw his average drop over 20 points to .254 with his downbeat week, but that’s still better than that lousy .211 showing with the Yankees last year that precipitated his departure to Pittsburgh. This is hardly alarming for the Pirates, who are appreciating Martin’s presence behind the plate—but they’re also hoping it doesn’t evolve itself into something more long-term.


BEST PITCHER, AMERICAN LEAGUE
Anibal Sanchez, Detroit Tigers

W-L
IP
H
R
ER
BB
IB
HB
WP
BK
SO
1-0 9 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 12

A near no-hitter this week. A completed no-no from 2006. Seventeen strikeouts in a masterful effort earlier this year. For a guy who has so many great games to boast about, it’s amazing that his career record remains below .500. But anyway, the really good Sanchez popped out on the mound and dominated the Twins, with only Joe Mauer’s one-out single in the ninth keeping him from achieving his second career no-hitter. His 2.38 ERA is easily on course to be a career best.


BEST PITCHER, NATIONAL LEAGUE
Cliff Lee, Philadelphia Phillies

W-L
IP
H
R
ER
BB
IB
HB
WP
BK
SO
1-0 9 3 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 5

He’s certainly getting better luck this season than last, when he won just six games in 30 starts despite a fine 3.16 ERA, but the veteran lefty showed again that when all else fails, take matters into your own hands. And so Lee did this past Wednesday at Miami, where he made the lifeless Marlin bats look preschool. It was his 12th career shutout and his fifth win of the year, putting him within one of his entire total for 2012 as mentioned above. All this, and the Phillies are still only averaging 3.3 runs for him per start.


WORST PITCHER, AMERICAN LEAGUE
Vance Worley, Minnesota Twins

W-L
IP
H
R
ER
BB
IB
HB
WP
BK
SO
0-1 3.2 10 8 8 2 0 2 0 0 3

Worley, Worley bad. Ben Revere, the guy Philadelphia got in the trade that sent Worley to the Twins, hasn’t been all that great for the Phillies, but at least they don’t have Worley to suffer with anymore. Neither does the Twins, who sent him down to Triple-A after his latest awful effort this past week at Atlanta. The 25-year-old righty won only one of ten starts and produced a terrible 7.21 ERA; worse, opponents were hitting a Ted Williams-like .381 against him.


WORST PITCHER, NATIONAL LEAGUE
Wade Miley, Arizona Diamondbacks

W-L
IP
H
R
ER
BB
IB
HB
WP
BK
SO
0-1 3.2 7 7 7 1 0 0 0 0 1

Last year’s rookie sensation, this year’s sophomore straggler. Okay, so it hasn’t been quite that bad for Miley—but after looking so good in 2012, one would have expected something to build on. Instead, it’s been a challenge just to hold up the fort. And what’s with his problems with San Diego, who knocked him around this past Saturday? Miley is now 1-4 with a 7.52 career ERA against the low-rent Padres.


BEST TEAM, AMERICAN LEAGUE
Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (6-0)

If the Angels are to awaken from the dead and put pressure on the first-place-by-a-mile Rangers, they’d better step on it quick. And that’s exactly what they did this past week, as Mike Trout and Company put a two-game hurt on the visiting Mariners (outscoring them 19-1) before hammering the Royals with a four-game weekend sweep in Kansas City. Riding an eight-game win streak, the Angels this week get four dates with the misfiring Dodgers, followed by a weekend series with the awful Astros; if that isn’t sweet enough, Jered Weaver returns as well.


BEST TEAM, NATIONAL LEAGUE
Cincinnati Reds (5-1)

A late-inning collapse against the Cubs on Sunday kept the Reds from finishing the week undefeated (they might have withheld, but Aroldis Chapman was unavailable to close) but overall the Reds gotta be feeling pretty good about themselves as they finished the week with a 31-19 record, tied for the majors’ third best. A three-game sweep at New York against the Mets got the Reds off on the right foot to start, before taking two of three from the lowly Cubs.


WORST TEAM, AMERICAN LEAGUE
Kansas City Royals (1-6)

Getting swept by the Angels at home was bad enough, but perhaps even more embarrassing for the Royals was that they started the week losing two out of three at Houston. For the Royals, who many preseason pundits were expecting big things from, ranking fourth in AL team ERA and sixth in batting average just isn’t adding up to wins, as they’ve now lost 16 of their last 20 and are sinking perilously close to last place—a location they’ve experienced enough of over the years.


WORST TEAM, NATIONAL LEAGUE
New York Mets (1-5)

Some homestand this is turning out to be. The Mets came home to host the Reds and Braves, and while it’s known these are not the easiest teams to beat, you have to do better than 1-5 if you’re going to start making positive statements. They Mets only managed to avoid a winless week when Ike Davis, who had all but faded to the dark side, finally came alight and rallied the troops past Atlanta on Sunday night. But at 18-29, all the Mets’ faithful can say is: Thank God for the Marlins.


 

 

 

Best and Worst of the Week

Monday, May 20
Not even Coors Field can stop the hot Pat Corbin. The young second-year Arizona lefty improves to 7-0 on the year (with a 1.44 ERA that’s the majors’ second best) by taming the live ballpark and its tenants, the Colorado Rockies, with a complete-game, three-hit 5-1 win. It’s the first time since 1998 that a visiting pitcher has gone the distance and struck out at least ten Rockies at Coors.

The Seattle Mariners score one at Cleveland in the eighth inning to tie, one in the ninth to take the lead and one more in the tenth to retake the lead—and still lose when the Indians’ Yan Gomes belts his second homer of the game, a three-run shot that propels the Tribe to a 10-8, ten-inning victory. It’s the Indians’ fifth straight win and 18th over their last 22.

After winning 109 straight games in which they led after seven, the Baltimore Orioles have now lost two in a row in that situation, as closer Jim Johnson blows his third consecutive save opportunity (after nailing down 35 straight) on a ninth-inning home run by New York’s Travis Hafner; the Yankees rally for two in the tenth to overcome the Orioles at Camden Yards, 6-4.


Tuesday, May 21
Mike Trout aids in a rare moment of complete satisfaction for the disappointing Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim as they swamp the Kansas City Royals, 12-0; the star outfielder becomes the first Angel to hit for the cycle since 2006 and the youngest American Leaguer ever to achieve the feat (beating Alex Rodriguez by 25 days). Trout’s eighth-inning home run is the last of his four hits on the day.

After going 15-0 at Milwaukee’s Miller Park as a member of the Brewers, Zack Greinke returns wearing a Dodger uniform—and loses, 5-2. Greinke takes a 2-1 lead into the bottom of the fifth but gives up hits to the first five Brewers—four of who score—before being replaced; it’s also his first loss of the season.


Wednesday, May 22
A day after admitting that he let his team down by failing to fully charge after a crucial deep fly ball, Bryce Harper atones at San Francisco. His sixth-inning homer gives the Nationals a 1-0 lead, his defense in right field keeps them ahead, and he scores the game-winner in the tenth after doubling to give Washington a 2-1 getaway win over the Giants.

The early spring layoff may have been the medicine for Francisco Liriano, who shines again in his third start for Pittsburgh after a freak domestic broken-arm injury at Christmas kept him out of action through early May. The veteran lefty throws seven shutout innings and improves to 3-0 with a 1.00 ERA in three starts as the Pirates edge the Chicago Cubs at PNC Park, 1-0, and improve to 28-18, tied for the fourth best record in the majors.


Thursday, May 23
Cleveland manager Terry Francona returns to Boston’s Fenway Park for the first time since the Red Sox dumped him at the end of the 2011 season and is all smiles, and not just because his former team gives him a nice series of all-is-forgiven pregame tributes. His Indians clobber the Red Sox by a 12-3 count, racking up 16 hits and eight walks on Ryan Dempster and five Red Sox relievers.

Joe Blanton finally gets his first win of the year after a 0-7 start and gets supported by four Angel home runs—all of them off former Angel Ervin Santana—as Los Angeles of Anaheim defeats the Royals at Kansas City, 5-4. The four jacks served up by Santana match a career nadir.


Friday, May 24
Detroit’s Anibal Sanchez has a no-hitter going in the ninth inning when, with one out, Minnesota’s Joe Mauer breaks it up with a single up the middle. Sanchez completes the one-hit, 6-0 shutout at Comerica Park, striking out 12 and walking three on 130 pitches. It would have been Sanchez’s second career no-hitter; for Mauer, it’s the third time in his career in which he’s provided his team with the lone hit in a game.

The home cooking finally comes out rotten for Seattle’s Joe Saunders. Struggling on the road but shining at home, the veteran lefty suffers his first career loss at Safeco Field, getting shelled for six runs in five innings by Texas in the Rangers’ 9-5 win. Saunders was 9-0 in 13 previous starts at Safeco with a 1.72 ERA.


Saturday, May 25
Trailing 5-4 with a man on base in the bottom of the tenth, the Giants’ Angel Pagan cracks a deep drive that hits off the angular right-field wall at AT&T Park and escapes Colorado outfielders to the point that Pagan is able to secure an inside-the-park homer and defeat the Rockies, 6-5. It’s the first “walk-off” inside-the-park job in the majors since Rey Sanchez did it for Tampa Bay (also against the Rockies) in 2004—and the first by a Giant since Bill Terry in 1931.

Matt Moore is sitting pretty to become the majors’ first nine-game winner, but Fernando Rodney blows it for him and the Rays—again. The Yankees tie the game off the beleaguered closer in the ninth with two runs and win it two innings later, 4-3, on a Lyle Overbay homer off of Josh Lueke. Moore allows a run on five hits through six innings of work but remains 8-0 for the year.

All nine Oakland batters knock in at least a run in the A’s 11-5 romp at Houston, the first time that’s happened in a major league game in nearly two years. Josh Donaldson knocks in two runs off of four hits including a home run for Oakland, which is now 8-0 against the Astros—and 19-23 against actual major league teams. (The A's will win again the next day to make it 9-0.)


Sunday, May 26
Terry Francona’s homecoming series at Boston ends in nightmarish fashion. Leading 5-2 in the ninth, Cleveland closer Chris Perez can’t keep the lead—and worse, has to depart with an injured shoulder. Jacoby Ellsbury’s two-out double scores two runs and wins the game for the Red Sox over Francona’s Indians, 6-5.

Last-minute heroics are also the story in Toronto, where Baltimore’s Jim Johnson can’t hold a three-run, ninth-inning lead. Munenori Kawasaki hits his own two-out, two-run double to give the Blue Jays a walk-off 6-5 win. It’s Johnson’s fourth blown save in his last five tries; he’s now allowed 12 runs in his last five innings of work.

It takes 13 innings, but the Mariners snap an eight-game skid by edging the Rangers at Seattle, 4-3. The M’s are on the brink of defeat in the 11th inning, but Raul Ibanez strokes a one-out homer to re-tie the game and keep it going until two innings later, when Jason Bay’s two-out single brings home Kendrys Morales.

The New York Mets end two losing streaks of their own—an overall five-game slide and an eight-game drought at home—and put a stop to Atlanta’s eight-game win streak from an unlikely source: Ike Davis, who entered the game with just two hits over his last 44 at-bats. Davis’ two-run, eighth-inning single—his second hit of the night—caps a three-run rally to push the Mets past the Braves, 4-2.


WBC, as in "We Be Cursed"
It’s bad enough that the World Baseball Classic hasn’t lived up to its full potential, even with three tourneys already in the history books. Interest from star players has been tepid. Attendance has been a mixed bag at best. Eligibility rules are a joke. Baseball fans yawn at the concept’s progress, more eagerly awaiting the MLB regular season during the WBC’s run in March.

But now it must be said: Something deeper and darker has attached itself to the WBC. It’s a curse. A curse upon its participants. Not everyone has been afflicted—many have gotten off to their usual solid starts in the MLB regular campaign—but so many of the tourney’s major drawing cards have been ineffective or seriously banged up since Opening Day. So for those thinking about the next WBC, be warned: Relax and play out spring training, or be part of the world-wide dance and be messed up come Opening Day or shortly thereafter.

Here’s ten players who didn’t heed that advice this past March:

John Axford (Canada). The one-time Milwaukee closer was already something of a mess after his collapse during the 2012 campaign, but it’s gotten worse this year; he’s been stripped of his ninth-inning duties, and he’s struggling to hold on to his current calling as the eighth-inning set-up man as his ERA has been hanging around the 10.00 mark for the first two months of the season.

Mitchell Boggs (USA). The right-handed reliever earned his way on the American side with a stellar set-up performance (2.21 ERA, 34 holds) for Jason Motte in St. Louis during 2012. But since his return to the Cardinals, his 2013 numbers are even worse than Axford’s with an ERA north of 10.00—and it resulted in an early May demotion to the minors.

Luis Cruz (Mexico). A sturdy and steady competitor late last year for the Dodgers as well as with the Mexican team this spring, he’s been a disaster back in Los Angeles—hitting below .100 with no extra base hits and just one walk in 73 at-bats this far. Perhaps the baseball gods are punishing him for telling teammate Arnold Leon to throw at Canadian players during the tourney (a suggestion that led to an all-out brawl).

Octavio Dotel (Dominican Republic). Okay, he’s nearly 40, but he’s played such steady ball over time (albeit for so many different teams) and threw 4.2 scoreless innings for the victorious Dominicans in the WBC. But a spate of bad outings back with the Tigers and a right elbow injury has left him on the sideline with a 13.50 ERA as of this past week.

Yovani Gallardo (Mexico). He’s not stinking up the joint the way some of the above players on this list have, but a 3-4 record and 4.79 ERA are not numbers usually connected with a qualified ace. Throw in a drunken driven arrest in April and you have a guy who’s certainly being dogged by the post-WBC blues.

Hanley Ramirez (Dominican Republic). The flashy shortstop missed April after injuring his thumb in the WBC final, returned to the Dodgers just long enough to play four games and get five hits in 11 at-bats before messing up his hamstring on the very same field (San Francisco’s AT&T Park). Cursed, indeed.

Jose Reyes (Dominican Republic). Great WBC numbers, great early season numbers for the Blue Jays—and then he suffered a severely sprained ankle that will keep him out for nearly three months. A major blow for Toronto—and major fodder for WBC conspiracy theorists like us.

Fernando Rodney (Dominican Republic). The Tampa Bay closer is perhaps the biggest boom-to-bust out of the WBC. Rodney was spectacular (0.60 ERA, 48 saves in 50 attempts) for the Rays last year, and saved all seven games while allowing a single hit over 7.1 innings for the Dominican WBC team in March. But he’s badly struggled for the Rays since, already blowing five save opps and slogging along with a 6.00+ERA.

Giancarlo Stanton (USA). The imposing slugger has been a surprising non-factor for the stripped-down Marlins this year, and a non-presence since suffering a hamstring injury at the end of April. He’s not expected back until mid-June.

Ryan Vogelsong (USA). Many Giants fans are wondering if Vogelsong’s two WBC starts messed up his preparation for the regular season, given his 2-4, 7.19 ERA start for San Francisco; adding injury to insult, just when he seemed back to his old self in his latest start at AT&T Park, he got his hand broken while at bat. Don’t expect to see him on the mound again until after the All-Star Break.

Pinstripes on the Pitch?
The New York Yankees and soccer’s Manchester City (not to be confused with England’s other superpower, Manchester United) linked arms this past week in announcing that they would chip in to become co-owners of a new Major League Soccer franchise that will begin play in 2015 and may use Yankee Stadium as a temporary home until a soccer-specific venue is built, likely in the shadows of Citi Field—a scenario that has reportedly irked the rival Mets.

Soccer can no doubt play at Yankee Stadium—a Saturday exhibition between Manchester City and fellow Premier League member Chelsea drew 40,000 fans—but can baseball play in England? The partnership between the Yankees and the Blues has raised the specter that MLB might consider an exhibition or even regular season game at Manchester City’s stadium involving the Yankees.

Gloom Over Miami
The City of Miami lost not one but two shots at hosting the Super Bowl this past week when the 2016 and 2017 games were given to, respectively, Santa Clara, California (where the San Francisco 49ers will soon move to) and Houston. While fans and locals in those cities were salivating over the revenue the Super Bowl will bring, people back in Miami took their anger out on…Jeffrey Loria.

So what does Loria have to do with the loss of the Super Bowl? Miami was considered the frontrunner to land at least one of the Super Bowls (likely the 2016 game), but only if local politicians approved funding to fix up Dolphins Stadium. But they didn’t, because in large part of the bad aftertaste of the screw job Loria handed them when he pled poverty and convinced the powers-that-be to pay the bulk of the tab for his new home of Marlins Park to the tune of $2.4 billion over a 40-year period. So even when Loria doesn’t do a damn thing to get himself in trouble, he finds himself there, anyway.

That’s a Load of Spit
After serving up a home run to Philadelphia’s Dominic Brown this past Monday, Miami pitcher Alex Sanabia was caught red-handed by TV cameras depositing a good dose of his saliva on the baseball; no one on the field caught him, and nobody in the stands saw it, because this was Miami—where there is nobody in the stands. When told that he was caught red-handed by the cameras, Sanabia responded—with all seriousness—that he didn’t know spitballs were illegal.

Let’s Go to the Replay (Oh, Sorry, We Can’t)
If Angel Hernandez is so much against video replay that he’ll botch his own reviews on purpose as Peter Gammons recently suggested, then he’ll need to be a better umpire. Hernandez, who was the crew chief in determining, after further video review, that Oakland’s Adam Rosales did not hit a ninth-inning, game-tying homer in Cleveland a few weeks back (despite conclusive evidence to the contrary), made an even bigger gaffe on Friday at Chicago—calling the White Sox’ Alex Rios out at first to end a double play and a bases-loaded, tenth-inning threat that otherwise would have allowed the winning run to score against Miami. Replays showed that Rios not only was safe, it wasn’t even close. (Note to White Sox broadcaster Hawk Harrelson: Simmer down.) The White Sox overcame Hernandez’s rotten thought and tipped the Marlins an inning later, 4-3.

Bad umpiring—no, make that embarrassing umpiring—reared its ugly head later that evening in Seattle on another double play that shouldn’t have been. First base umpire Jeff Nelson declared the Mariners’ Jesus Sucre (in his first major league at-bat) out at first to complete a second-inning double play because he thought Texas first baseman Mitch Moreland made the putout—but it actually was caught by Ranger pitcher Justin Grimm, who had come over to cover and put his glove in front of Moreland’s, never mind that he was three feet off the first base bag. You would think Nelson would have reconsidered when he saw Grimm pulling the ball out of his mitt and began throwing it around the infield, but he didn’t. The Mariners went on to lose, 9-5.

Then came Saturday, when Alfonso Marquez blew not one but two easy calls that went against San Francisco, both of which came in critical situations. Fortunately for the Giants, they overcame Marquez’s errors and defeated Colorado in ten innings, 6-5.

Commissioner Bud Selig recently said he was ready for expanded, comprehensive video review in MLB. You better hurry, Bud—and please heed our suggestions as to how to best make it work.

As Sure as the Sun Rising in the East
This is how robotically excellent Miguel Cabrera has become: The Detroit star slugger has knocked in 20 RBIs in May, the ninth consecutive full month on the baseball calendar that he’s done that. The last player to reach 20 in nine straight months was Boston’s David Ortiz from 2005-06.

And Speaking of Miggy…
Cabrera is obviously a star of stars, but it never hurts to be lucky on occasion. Such was the case in Cleveland on Wednesday evening when his deep drive to the center field warning track literally bounced in and out of Michael Bourn’s glove and over the fence for a home run in the Tigers’ 11-7 win over the Indians. There may have been a few long-time, die-hard Indian fans in the crowd who bore witness to the last time an outfielder assisted on a home run, when Jose Canseco (then playing for Texas) had a ball bounce off his head and into the bleachers at old Cleveland Stadium in 1993.

And Speaking of Jose…
Canseco was named a suspect in an alleged rape of a woman he befriended in Las Vegas. Because he seems to enjoy showing up as a blip on the TMZ radar, Canseco put out a series of tweets reporting his status with police and what they accused him of—even typing in the name of his accuser, a real classy touch even if he truly believes he’s innocent. The 48-year-old Canseco is currently toiling as a player-coach for the independent Fort Worth Cats. (Yes, he’s still playing.)

And Then There’s Manny
While
Bryce Harper and Mike Trout have been getting the lion’s share of attention from the baseball world for their exceptional pre-drinking age exploits, lost in the discussion is Baltimore third baseman Manny Machado. Still just 20, Machado this past week became the first major leaguer since the legendary Ty Cobb, in his breakout 1907 campaign, to knock out at least three hits in five straight road games. Machado, who’s hitting .327, also set a record by collecting more hits (72) before the end of May then any other major leaguer below the age of 21.

First Draft, Apparently
Bad Royals Graphic Unless it’s really, really funny, we usually pass on the items that come along on sites like Deadspin on an almost weekly basis that show a dubious typo on a graphic or closed caption during a MLB broadcast. But the graphic shown here shows that someone in the video room clearly flunked the quiz on baseball knowledge. We’re just hoping the text number was also wrong, because Bryce Hunter and Matt Jones—whoever the heck they are—certainly don’t deserve this honor.

Always Playing Catch-Up
Seems hard to believe, but Philadelphia pitcher Cole Hamels hasn’t pitched on the mound with the Phillies ahead since his April 7 start against Kansas City—a stretch of nearly two months and nine starts. He does have credit for a win during this time; he was the pitcher of record in the Phillies’ 5-1 victory at New York on April 28, throwing his last pitch of that game just before the Phillies broke a 1-1 tie and held on. In the other eight games during this weird run, the Phillies have averaged just 1.4 runs for Hamels.

That is Yellow Dye on the Cone, Right?
A vendor at a Houston Astros game was fired for taking his rack of snow cones with him into the men’s bathroom and placing it down on the floor, right in front of the toilet he was sitting on.

League vs. League
The National League was closing the edge on the American League in interleague play to start the week, but then the Miami Marlins were put in charge of maintaining the momentum with a weekend series at Chicago against the White Sox. Yeah, right. The pathetic Marlins lost all three games, and the AL ended the week holding its slim lead over the NL at 32-29 on the year to date. But here comes this week and all-out war between the two leagues with interleague play everywhere, led by the yearly crosstown rivalries (Yankees-Mets, Dodgers-Angels, Giants-A’s, etc.), so there’s a long way to go for before the AL can clinch its tenth straight year of supremacy over its older cousin.

This Week’s Challenger to Joe DiMaggio
The white-hot
Miguel Cabrera ends this past week with the majors’ longest active hitting streak at 12 games. A bad day has indeed been rare for the Detroit superstar of late; he’s been hitless in just two of his last 37 games. This is the third time this season that Cabrera has had hitting streaks of ten or more games.

Wounded of the Week
wounded of the weekIn a quiet news week of injury reports, the biggest noise came out of Yankeeland (surprise!) where Curtis Granderson, back for only eight games after missing nearly three months to a broken arm suffered in spring training, was hit again at the plate—this time breaking his knuckle bone on his left hand. He’ll miss another four weeks as a result of his latest injury.

MLB’s House of Pain also welcomed in Philadelphia’s chronically inactive Chase Utley (oblique), his catching teammate Carlos Ruiz (hamstring), back strain patients in Baltimore reliever Pedro Strop and Boston third baseman Will Middlebrooks, Cincinnati reliever Sean Marshall (shoulder) and San Francisco pitchers Ryan Vogelsong (broken hand) and Santiago Casilla (knee surgery).


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