This Great Game Comebacker

The Week That Was in Baseball: May 6-12, 2013
A Bad Week for the Men in Blew What the Marlins' Fire Sale Has Wrought
Why PNC Park Nearly Didn't Get Built 42's Biggest Critic (And For Good Reason)

Best and Worst of the Week

BEST HITTER, AMERICAN LEAGUE
Evan Longoria, Tampa Bay Rays

AB
R
H
2B
3B
HR
RBI
BB
IB
HB
SB
28 8 12 5 0 3 11 4 0 0 0

Longo set the tone for a terrific week with a grand slam against the Blue Jays and highlighted his efforts with a walk-off blast on Saturday against the Padres, his first since the famous game-winner he smacked against the Yankees that put the Rays in the 2011 playoffs. Longoria missed the second half of 2012 and it likely cost the Rays another postseason appearance; they need him healthy and potent for them to return this year. So far, so good.


BEST HITTER, NATIONAL LEAGUE
Paul Goldschmidt, Arizona Diamondbacks

AB
R
H
2B
3B
HR
RBI
BB
IB
HB
SB
23 5 8 0 0 4 9 3 0 0 0

The big first baseman from the First State (that’s Delaware, folks) was a one-man wrecking crew in the Diamondbacks’ three-game sweep at Los Angeles to start the week, doing all of his week’s damage against the Dodgers before experiencing a much quieter series back home against Philadelphia. Overall, Goldschmidt is evolving into the stud slugger the D-Backs have envisioned, and opponents have brooded; we know the to-date sample size is small, but he’s on pace to hit 38 homers with 128 RBIs.


WORST HITTER, AMERICAN LEAGUE
Alcides Escobar, Kansas City Royals

AB
R
H
2B
3B
HR
RBI
BB
IB
HB
SB
29 1 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0

Of the Royals’ six losses this past week, five of them were by two runs or less; some of those defeats might have been avoided had the normally reliable shortstop reached base more often and used his speedy legs to pick up some critical runs. Making Escobar’s ledger for the week more painful two double play grounders that killed other K.C. rallies. Escobar’s been a solid .290 hitter since the start of last year, so the hope from Royals Nation is that this is nothing more than a bad week at the office.


WORST HITTER, NATIONAL LEAGUE
Greg Dobbs, Miami Marlins

AB
R
H
2B
3B
HR
RBI
BB
IB
HB
SB
19 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

Nobody’s hitting the ball worse than the no-hit, no-win Marlins, so it makes perfect sense that one of their own is individually repped here. Funny thing is, Dobbs’ last two years (and his first two with the Marlins) weren’t that bad with averages at .275 and .285 in 2011 and 2012, respectively; with this week’s lousy performance, Dobbs’ .209 figure for 2013 has sunk below major league waters as he sleeps with the rest of the Fishes in Lorialand.


BEST PITCHER, AMERICAN LEAGUE
Jon Lester, Boston Red Sox

W-L
IP
H
R
ER
BB
IB
HB
WP
BK
SO
1-0 9 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

After waffling about in three successive starts, the 29-year-old lefty came soaring back to the top form he displayed in April and remained undefeated for the season (at 5-0) with a sensational one-hit shutout of Toronto this past Friday. Lester retired the first 17 Blue Jays he faced and came that close to his second career no-hitter; he continues to perform at a much higher level than last year’s lost campaign in which he wrapped at 9-14 with a 4.82 ERA.


BEST PITCHER, NATIONAL LEAGUE
Shelby Miller, St. Louis Cardinals

W-L
IP
H
R
ER
BB
IB
HB
WP
BK
SO
1-0 9 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13

While Lester was keeping the Blue Jays hitless into the sixth inning, the 22-year-old Cardinal rookie spotted Colorado a leadoff hit in the first, then summarily dismissed the next 27 Rockies all in a row to grab big headlines across the baseball universe and call big-time attention to what has been an excellent start (5-2 with a stellar 1.58 ERA). Maybe opponents are still trying to compile the book on Miller and his weaknesses—and if so, they’re taking an awfully long time to do it.


WORST PITCHER, AMERICAN LEAGUE
Allen Webster, Boston Red Sox

W-L
IP
H
R
ER
BB
IB
HB
WP
BK
SO
0-1 1.2 6 8 8 3 0 0 0 0 2

There was bad news, good news and worst news this past Wednesday for the man considered Boston’s top pitching prospect. The bad news: Webster gave up four first-inning runs. The good news: The Red Sox bailed him out with five runs of their own in the bottom of the inning. The worse news: He surrendered four more runs in the second before being mercifully removed. It all added up to a lousy second major league start for Webster, two weeks after looking pretty darn decent in his debut against the Royals. After the game, back to Triple-A Pawtucket he went.


WORST PITCHER, NATIONAL LEAGUE
Hiram Burgos, Milwaukee Brewers

W-L
IP
H
R
ER
BB
IB
HB
WP
BK
SO
0-1 3 11 12 10 3 0 0 0 0 2

The Puerto Rican rookie came into Saturday’s outing at Cincinnati feeling pretty good about himself, having put together three satisfying starts to begin the season. But that became distant prologue after three innings and an ambush of Reds hitting later. He might have been removed sooner, but the Brewers were badly short-handed in the bullpen and manager Ron Roenicke had no choice but to leave Burgos in for the beating of his life, adding afterward, “I don’t ever want to do that to somebody again.”


BEST TEAM, AMERICAN LEAGUE
Cleveland Indians (6-1)

Now really, what was the over/under figure on combined wins from Ubaldo Jimenez and Scott Kazmir in one week? Certainly not three, but that’s where the number stood at week’s end, thanks in large part to Jimenez’s two victories—including a confidence-boosting duel over Justin Verlander on Saturday at Detroit. The truth is, the Indians’ success to this point (they’re tied with the Tigers for first) has been more about the hitting, as they finish the week among the majors’ best in batting average and homers.


BEST TEAM, NATIONAL LEAGUE
Arizona Diamondbacks (5-2)

The Snakes ran off five straight wins to start the week before running out of gas on the weekend against the Phillies, but they’ve certainly proven that they’re not to be trifled with nosing around the top of the NL West along with the Giants. A three-game sweep at Los Angeles surely hit the spot, and dynamic pitching throughout the week (even with closer J.J. Putz hitting the shelf) made life easy for D-Back bats and manager Kirk Gibson’s postgame chats with the press.


WORST TEAM, AMERICAN LEAGUE
Kansas City Royals (1-6)

It looks like the Indians are stealing all the thunder from the Royals, who were supposed to be the upstart competitors in the AL Central; it would have helped the Royals had they not gone back to looking small against two mean AL East opponents in the Orioles and Yankees. They’re still above .500, a major goal for 2013, but if they want to graduate to that level they’ll have to raise their game against the big boys, an exam they failed this past week.


WORST TEAM, NATIONAL LEAGUE
Miami Marlins (1-5)

The NL’s worst team (this week, and this season) couldn’t generate any believable Fish stories from their version of Southland Tales, looking awful against two Southern California teams (the Padres and Dodgers) playing plenty of stinky ball on their own. A no-name, all-lame offense could only muster one run in three games at shrunken Petco Park, and it managed its only win of the week in a come-from-behind, one-run squeaker on Friday at Los Angeles. The Marlins are back home this week, and if it gets any worse than this, they’ll have to tarp the lower deck, too.


 

 

 

Best and Worst of the Week

Monday, May 6
The struggling Toronto Blue Jays spot the Rays seven runs at Tampa Bay—and come back to win in, capping the 8-7 win with a two-run, ninth-inning home run by J.P. Arencibia. The loss and blown save is charged to Rays closer Fernando Rodney, who barely a month into the season has already allowed as many earned runs (six) as he did for the entire 2012 campaign, when he dominated with a 0.60 ERA and 48 saves in 50 attempts.


Tuesday, May 7
For the second straight night, the Blue Jays surge from behind to defeat the Rays—scoring five times over the final three innings to overcome a 4-1 deficit—but the evening is stained by the horrifying moment early on when starting pitcher J.A. Happ takes a line-drive comebacker from Desmond Jennings square off his left ear, leaving him writhing on the ground in pain and bleeding from that ear. Happ is carried off on a stretcher, but is listed in good condition the next day at a nearby hospital.

Matt Harvey is but an infield single from perfection, allowing just a grounder that the Chicago White Sox’ Alex Rios barely beats out in the seventh inning—but gets a no-decision as he’s removed after nine innings and 105 pitches in a 0-0 game at New York. The Mets will win it in the tenth on a Mike Baxter single; Harvey strikes out 12 and walks none in lowering his season ERA to 1.28, second best in the majors.

Atlanta closer Craig Kimbrel is rocked by back-to-back homers by the Reds’ Devin Mascoraco and Shin-Soo Choo with two outs in the ninth, handing victory to Cincinnati at Great American Ballpark, 5-4. It’s the third blown save of the early season for Kimbrel, matching his entire 2012 total.


Wednesday, May 8
The Houston Astros defeat the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, 3-1, ensuring their first series win of the year—the last major league team to do so in 2013. Starting pitcher Bud Norris scatters nine hits over eight innings to pick up his fourth win of the year for Houston, which is now a mere game and a half behind the high-priced, fourth-place Angels in the AL West.

The over is covered quickly in Boston, where the Minnesota Twins lead the Red Sox by an 11-6 count after just two innings before coasting to a 15-8 final. Despite all the offense, the Red Sox’ David Ortiz goes hitless in five at-bats—ending his 27-game hitting streak that had begun last July.


Thursday, May 9
The Angels avoid an embarrassing sweep in Houston by scoring three runs in the eighth inning to defeat the Astros, 6-5. The game is played under protest by Angel manager Mike Scioscia after Houston manager Bo Porter brings in reliever Wesley Wright and removes him with Hector Ambriz without facing a batter—a move that is technically not allowed. Perhaps Porter should have stuck with Wright; Ambriz gives up all three Angel eighth-inning runs on two hits and two walks and is charged with a blown save and the loss.

Two days after stroking the winning hit for the Mets against the White Sox, Mike Baxter comes off the bench late and does it again against Pittsburgh. His ninth-inning single to center scores Marlon Byrd and gives the Mets a 3-2 walk-off win over the Pirates at Citi Field.

The Washington Nationals get five early runs and make is stand to defeat Detroit at Nationals Park, 5-4, to sweep the Tigers in a short two-game series in what many consider a possible World Series preview. The Nats’ Ryan Zimmerman and Adam LaRoche, both of whom have struggled to start the season, combine for five hits, all singles.


Friday, May 10
St. Louis rookie pitcher Shelby Miller allows a leadoff, first-inning single to Colorado’s Eric Young Jr.—then retires the next 27 batters to complete a one-hit, 3-0 shutout over the Rockies for his first complete-game victory of his career. The 22-year-old right-hander strikes out 13 and lowers his season ERA to 1.58, second in the NL behind the Mets’ Matt Harvey. John Lackey, in 2006, was the last pitcher to retire 27 straight after allowing a leadoff baserunner.

Boston’s Jon Lester also has a brush with perfection, retiring the first 17 Blue Jays he faces at Fenway Park before settling for a one-hit shutout of his own. Maicer Izturis’ double is the only blemish on Lester’s ledger for the evening, as the Boston ace improves to 5-0 in the Red Sox’ 5-0 win.

Tampa Bay pitcher Alex Cobb is on pace to strike out 25 batters against the San Diego Padres, but there’s no way he’ll make it through nine innings; he doesn’t even go the required five to earn a win, pulled after 4.2 innings with 13 K’s (including four in one inning) and 117 pitches. The Rays, trailing 3-2 at that point, will later rally to defeat the Padres, 6-3. Cobb’s 13 strikeouts are the most ever by a major league pitcher throwing less than five innings in one game.

Trailing 6-0 after five innings, the Baltimore Orioles rally for three runs each in the sixth and seventh, then add another trey in the tenth to outlast the Twins at Minneapolis, 9-6. Chris Davis’ three doubles are among the Orioles’ 18 hits; Jim Johnson notches his 35th consecutive save without a blown opportunity, surpassing the club record set by Randy Myers in 1997.


Saturday, May 11
Colorado hitters continue to be befuddled by St. Louis starting pitching. A night after Shelby Miller’s one-hitter, Adam Wainwright blanks the Rockies on two hits, 3-0—taking a no-hitter into the eighth inning. Between the two games, the Rockies are retired in 40 consecutive plate appearances, the longest such stretch, tying the major league record previously set by the 1996 Rangers.

Texas pitcher Yu Darvish returns to Houston, the place where he fell an out shy of a perfect game in his first start of the year, and isn’t quite so perfect—but he’s good enough, striking out eight over seven innings and giving up three hits, two of those homers by Matt Dominguez, who hadn’t gone deep in 121 at-bats coming into the game. Still, the Rangers give Darvish victory with six sixth-inning runs while withstanding a ninth-inning uprising to edge the Astros, 8-7.

The Los Angeles Dodgers snap an eight-game losing slide by defeating the lowly Miami Marlins at Chavez Ravine, 7-1. Andre Ethier goes 4-for-4 in the win and is hitting .403 lifetime against the Marlins.


Sunday, May 12
The Cleveland Indians fight back late at Detroit with a two-out RBI single by Michael Brantley in the ninth to tie the game at 3-3—and another in the tenth from Mark Reynolds to give the Tribe a 4-3 win and a share of the AL Central lead with the Tigers. Jose Valverde, re-signed after Opening Day by the Tigers and for who had not yet given up a hit in five relief outings, blows his first save of the year by allowing the game-tying run.

For the fourth time this week, a major league starter throws nine innings of one-hit shutout ball as the White Sox’ Chris Sale blanks the Angels at U.S. Cellular Field, 3-0. Mike Trout’s single with one out in the seventh breaks up a no-hit bid for Sale, who throws his first career shutout while throwing just 98 pitches.


This Item Was Not Subject to the Approval of Major League Baseball or Its Clubs
Major League umpires had a week they’d rather forget. On Wednesday at Cleveland, The Oakland A’s trailed the Indians in the ninth inning, 4-3, when Adam Rosales hit a high deep fly that landed near the top of Progressive Field’s tall left-field wall and bounced back onto the field of play; the umpires ruled it a double but heeded A’s manager Bob Melvin’s plea to check the replay and make sure that it wasn’t a quadruple that first made contact above the yellow line. While home viewers were treated to replays that showed the ball ricocheting above the line for what indeed appeared to be a homer, the four umpires gathered around a 19-inch monitor apparently didn’t see what everyone else saw and, claiming inconclusive findings, upheld the original call. Melvin went bonkers and was ejected; Rosales could not score from second and the A’s rally fell short, losing to the Tribe.

Major League Baseball later admitted that the umpires blew the replay call—and a conspiratorial touch was added when ESPN’s Peter Gammons suggested that crew chief Angel Hernandez purposely failed to overturn his initial call as a silent protest of sorts against MLB’s replay system.

Why Our System Works Better
The replay failure in Cleveland, once again, serves as a plea for baseball to look into the TGG method of video replay. It’s comprehensive, yes, but also quick and efficient. It goes like this: Umpires see a homer as a double. Officials in press box tell crew chief to hold for no more than a minute while a review is started. MLB-hired officials huddles with “fifth” umpire in the booth and determine, using better equipment, that the call should be overturned. (This way, Gammons’ conspiracy theory becomes moot because the decision is not solely in the umpires’ hands.) Crew chief is told to reverse call. Game tied. All in less than a minute. Get on it, MLB.

And By the Way, There’s Three Outs to an Inning
A day after the Cleveland controversy, an even more egregious error took place when umpires in Houston allowed the Astros to make consecutive pitching changes in the eighth inning of their game against the Angels without facing a hitter. The rule is hardly obscure; you can send up a pinch-hitter and remove him for another if the other team brings in a new pitcher—but once you bring in a new pitcher, he has to face at least one hitter, unless he gets hurt or ejected beforehand. Neither happened here, and umpires inexplicably allowed Astro manager Bo Porter to bring in Wesley Wright and then Hector Ambriz without a single pitch thrown in between.

Angel manager Mike Scioscia couldn’t believe that four professional major league umpires all forgot one of baseball’s basic rules and fell for Porter’s Jedi mind trick (saying to them that the rule had changed), tearing out to vehemently argue his case—though unlike Melvin in Cleveland, he wasn’t ejected, probably because the umpires were already wobbly from the brain farts emanating from their earholes.

Poetic justice followed for Scioscia, who played the game under protest. Ambriz was allowed to take the mound and faced five Angel hitters; four of them reached base, two via walk, and three of them scored—giving the Angels a 6-5 lead they would keep. Replay was no factor here. A rule is a rule and the umpires obviously should have known better. MLB got hot on the case of this and suspended Fieldin Culbreth, the lead umpire in the Houston fiasco, for two games.

The Miami Marlins Are Not For Everyone. Side Effects Include…
The fallout from the Miami Marlins’ payroll freefall from the brief grace it had with its fans has begun to show itself. Official attendance isn’t so awful, at nearly 19,000 a game—but unless half of that figure is showing up dressed as empty seats, a lot of those purchased tickets aren’t being used. With that in mind, the Marlins have decided to close off the upper deck to Marlins Park for selected weeknight games. It’s not exactly what you’d expect to hear at a sparkling new ballpark operating in just its second year.

Here’s the other thing: When a new ballpark is built, the businesses usually follow. Typically they’re eating and drinking establishments, catering to fans who hang out before and after games. A year since the opening of Marlins Park, no one has set up shop around the ballpark. Over 8,500 square feet of retail space immersed within the four parking garages that surround Marlins Park remains empty; three potential tenants bolted when the Marlins underwent their fire sale last winter, according to the Miami Herald.

The Little Havana section of Miami where the ballpark is situated isn’t exactly an elite district, but San Francisco’s China Basin was derelict before AT&T Park was built, as were the areas where Cleveland’s Progressive Field, Seattle’s Safeco Field, Denver’s Coors Field and many other modern baseball palaces now sit. All this proves is that if you build it, they will come—unless you’re Jeffrey Loria.

Head Games (2013 Edition)
Less than a year after Brandon McCarthy’s season ended when a nasty line drive to his head, which led to discussions on whether pitchers should wear protective head gear, Toronto’s J.A. Happ collapsed to the ground when Tampa Bay’s Desmond Jennings laced a comebacker square off his left ear that resulted in a small fracture of his skull on Tuesday.

The topic of special headgear for pitchers is tricky, as we discussed last year. A batting helmet might have protected Happ, but pitchers also get nailed in the face—so do you add a football-style facemask? And what’s the next solution when pitchers tell you that the helmet is too heavy and too distracting for them to concentrate on throwing strikes? Titanium bubble wrap?

In the wake of Happ’s injury, McCarthy, now pitching for Arizona, spoke up again about the need for baseball to do something. He told USA Today that even though there’s nothing in the works to protect pitchers in a satisfactory way, he believes something will eventually come along. “We’ve put things on the moon before, so I feel like we could create some sort of a device that sits on your head and protects you,” he said. “It’s going to be a money-maker whatever it is. You can sell it to youth leagues and people will wear it all the way through. Usually good ideas go where the money is, so I think if enough companies get into that or people in their basement who are good at creating, someone will do it.”

“It’s just a matter of when, not if.”

Ssssh, and They Will Build It
Some gay athletes fear their livelihood on the playing field would become endangered if they publicly revealed their sexual orientation. Kevin McClatchy believes that coming out of the closet would have kept PNC Park from ever being built. No, the ballpark isn’t gay; McClatchy, who owned the Pittsburgh Pirates while they were seeking a new home, is. And he said this to Pittsburgh TV station KDKA this past week: “We were in a tenuous position. I mean from the day we got there in ’96 we spent four years trying to get funding to get PNC Park built. I didn’t think it was a good time to come out and try to make a statement…I just thought (coming out) could have derailed everything we were trying to do. I could not take that chance.”

McClatchy sold the Pirates in 2007; he came out as gay last September.

86’d by 42
The recently released 42 may have scored with critics and the box office, but it struck out with Sherrill Duesterhaus. So who is Sherrill Duesterhaus? She’s the 66-year-old daughter of Fritz Ostermueller, the former Pittsburgh Pirates pitcher demonized in 42 for hitting Jackie Robinson and yelling out, “You don’t belong here and you never will.” The implication that Ostermueller represented the racist element angered at Robinson’s breaking of the color barrier didn’t sit well with Duesterhaus, who insists that her father wasn’t biased and was more concerned that he’d hit Robinson because he crowded the plate. When she saw the scene of Ostermueller throwing at Robinson’s head, she said: “It just took my breath away…I thought, ‘All those people are sitting here believing (he threw at Robinson intentionally) and it didn’t happen.’ It broke my heart.” No comment from Warner Brothers, the film’s distributor.

That Damn Kid, How Many Times Have I Told Him to Clean Up His Coke!
Otis Nixon’s retirement from baseball continues to be as controversial and sad as when he played. A year ago, he was called out by a local TV station for allegedly scamming relatives of convicts who believed he could get them early release for a price. This past week, his addictive past caught up to him as he was arrested for possessing crack cocaine. When stopped by cops for driving erratically—and being found with the offending drug—Nixon claimed it was left behind by his son. (Let’s hope he doesn’t have a son and was making it all up, because if one exists, that’s a lousy way for Nixon to treat him.) A speedy outfielder during his playing days for the Atlanta Braves in the early 1990s, Nixon was suspended 60 days by MLB for cocaine possession in 1991.

It’s the White Thing Against the Sky, Guys
There’s no worse feeling than to have everyone at the ballpark know where the ball is—except you, and you’re the guy who’s got to catch it. The saving grace for Miami’s Marcell Ozuna and Boston’s Daniel Nava is that they didn’t have to worry about chasing the fly balls hit toward them, because they ended up in the seats as home runs. What was graceful was how absolutely foolish they looked standing helpless well shy of the warning track, looking up, arms pleading outward, with no clue as to where the ball was. The Red Sox’ Nava was burned on a home run by Texas’ Ian Kinsler a week earlier, and here’s Ozuna trying to locate the ball hit by San Diego’s Max Venable this past Tuesday.

In an Interleague of His Own
About the only thing that possibly flustered the Mets’ Matt Harvey in the midst of his brilliant nine-inning, one-hit performance on Tuesday against the Chicago White Sox was opposing pitcher Hector Santiago, who kept everyone waiting in the sixth inning without realizing it; he either lost track of his turn in the lineup or forgot that he was on National League turf, which means nobody was DH’ing for him. Santiago was chased out of the clubhouse by teammates, quickly grabbed a helmet and bat, and struck out against Harvey.

Rain of Protest
The Washington Nationals are not far behind the Marlins in terms of dishonesty and bullying (their dealings with D.C. politicos in getting Nationals Park built will someday become a must-read book), and they were at it again this past week. When the first game of a highly awaited two-game series with the Detroit Tigers was canceled because of rain, the Nationals quickly put into place a new and rather restricted rainout policy: Your tickets are only good for the makeup game played two days later, starting at 4:05 in the afternoon.

Typically, teams will allow fans holding rain checks to use them for any future game (as long as seats are available), but the Nationals’ hasty decision put an unwise burden on their customers to return to the ballpark on short notice or to merit the tickets no other value whatsoever. When the Nationals began receiving a flood of angry calls from rained-out ticket holders, they realized what bad P.R. they had unleashed upon themselves. They quickly reversed their policy.

League vs. League
The National League got off to a good start this past week in trying to wrestle the season lead from the American League in the interleague wars, but then it became the San Diego Padres’ turn to keep the momentum going with a road trip to Tampa Bay—and boy, did they screw it up, getting swept by the Rays in three games to extend the AL’s winning record to 25-21 against the NL for the year.

This Week’s Challenger to Joe DiMaggio
After
David Ortiz’s long streak ended just shy of the halfway point of the Yankee Clipper’s fabled streak, it was back to the drawing board and Marco Scutaro, who’s waking up after a slow start to the 2013 season and ends this past week with the majors’ longest active hitting streak at 12 games. The red-hot San Francisco second baseman is hitting a whopping .479 and has raised his season average 100 points to over .300 during his run.

Wounded of the Week
wounded of the weekWe pretty much called it last week when we gave Roy Halladay the dishonor of being the week’s worst NL’s pitcher: If the venerable Philadelphia ace is this bad, a disabled list stay can’t be too far behind. Sure enough, Halladay checked himself into the MLB Medical Ward, where he’ll undergo surgery for a partially torn rotator cuff; he isn’t expected to return to action for at least a few months. In the meantime, Halladay gave a heartfelt apology to Phillies fans for his failure to be his usual self on the mound over the past year and a half.

This was also not a good week to be healthy if your first name consisted of initials. Arizona closer J.J. Putz (elbow), Texas catcher A.J. Pierzynski (oblique) and, of course, Toronto pitcher J.A. Happ (beaned by a comebacker), all made the Ouch Couch this week and will sit out the minimum 15 days.

Elsewhere, there was a double-dose of bad news to start the week for the Boston Red Sox, who lost not one but two closers; Andrew Bailey (elbow) will be back within a few weeks, but Joel Hanrahan (forearm) has been declared done for the season.

Also sent to the shelf is Oakland slugger Josh Riddick (wrist), Washington outfielder Jayson Werth (hamstring), Colorado outfielder Michael Cuddyer (neck), Miami second baseman Donovan Solano (strained left intercostal muscle, and we dare you to say where that is), Derek Jeter’s replacement at short, Eduardo Nunez (rib cage), St. Louis pitcher Jake Westbrook (elbow) and Chicago White Sox pitcher Gavin Floyd, out for the season with elbow issues.


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