Colorado Rockies


Ballparks of the Rockies
Mile High Stadium (1993-94); Coors Field (1995-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates team record. * - World Series champion. # - National League champion. w - Western Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1993 67 95 .414 37 6 .273 758 142 146 5.41 Andres Galarraga Armando Reynoso 4,483,350
1994 53 64 .453 6.5 3 .274 573 125 91 5.15 Andres Galarraga Marvin Freeman 3,281,511
1995 77 67 .535 1 ! 2 .282 785 200 125 4.97 Dante Bichette Darren Holmes 3,390,037
1996 83 79 .512 8 3 .287 961 221 201 5.60 Ellis Burks Kevin Ritz 3,891,014
1997 83 79 .512 7 3 .288 923 239 137 5.25 Larry Walker John Thomson 3,888,453
1998 77 85 .475 21 4 .291 826 183 67 5.00 Larry Walker Darryl Kile 3,792,683
1999 72 90 .444 28 5 .288 906 223 70 6.02 Larry Walker Pedro Astacio 3,481,065
2000 82 80 .506 15 4 .294 968 161 131 5.26 Todd Helton Gabe White 3,295,129

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the Colorado Rockies?
Todd Helton > Rightfully crowned Mr. Rockie for his 16 years of service, .316 career batting average and 369 home runs
Jerry McMorris > Original owner who made Rockies an entertaining and competitive organization through 2005
Troy Tulowitzki > Gifted, powerful shortstop has been a major marquee attraction at Coors Field since his 2007 rookie debut
Larry Walker > Almost too good for Coors Field (where he hit a career .381), nabbing three batting titles and 1997 MVP


2001 73 89 .451 19 5 .292 923 213 132 5.29 Todd Helton Jose Jimenez 3,166,821
2002 73 89 .451 25 4 .274 778 152 103 5.20 Todd Helton Jason Jennings 2,737,838
2003 74 88 .457 26.5 4 .267 853 198 66 5.20 Todd Helton Darren Oliver 2,334,085
2004 68 94 .420 25 4 .275 833 202 44 5.54 Todd Helton Joe Kennedy 2,338,069
2005 67 95 .414 15 5 .267 740 150 65 5.13 Todd Helton Brian Fuentes 1,914,389
2006 76 86 .469 12 T-4 .270 813 157 85 4.66 Matt Holliday Jeff Francis 2,104,362
2007 90 73 .552 0.5 ! # 2 .280 860 171 100 4.32 Matt Holliday Jeff Francis 2,376,250
2008 74 88 .457 10 3 .263 747 160 141 4.77 Matt Holliday Aaron Cook 2,650,218
2009 92 70 .568 3 ! 2 .261 804 190 106 4.22 Troy Tulowitzki Huston Street 2,665,080
2010 83 79 .512 9 3 .263 770 173 99 4.14 Carlos Gonzalez Ubaldo Jimenez 2,875,245
2011 73 89 .451 21 4 .258 735 163 118 4.43 Carlos Gonzalez Jhoulys Chacin 2,909,777
2012 64 98 .395 30 5 .274 758 166 100 5.22 Carlos Gonzalez Rafael Betencourt 2,630,458
2013 74 88 .457 18 5 .270 706 159 112 4.44 Troy Tulowitzki Jhoulys Chacin 2,793,828
2014 66 96 .407 28 4 .276 755 186 85 4.84 Corey Dickerson Jorge De La Rosa 2,680,329
2015 68 94 .420 24 5 .265 737 186 97 5.04 Nolan Arenado Jorge De La Rosa 2,506,789
2016 75 87 .463 16 3 .275 845 204 66 4.91 Nolan Arenado Tyler Chatwood 2,602,524

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the Rockies' History on This Great Game:

2007 baseball history2007: Bow if You Will, Spit if You Wish Barry Bonds breaks the all-time home run record under suspicious circumstances, but the other big news in the NL West is the Rockies' remarkable run to the postseason—and their first National League pennant.


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Bushers Book

The Rockies by the Decade


1990s A prime candidate for baseball over the decades, Denver was finally awarded a franchise for 1993—and a highly active fan base justified those who asked why it took MLB so long by clicking the turnstiles a record-shattering 4.48 million times in the Rockies’ inaugural season. The team built a terrific collection of offensive talent led by Larry Walker and Andres Galarraga, whose outrageous numbers were pumped up by Colorado’s mile-high conditions that allowed the baseball to travel farther. But it worked both ways; Rockie pitching suffered as a result of the thin air, tempering total success as the team made one postseason appearance (in 1995 as a wild card) but otherwise remained a .500 squad at best.


2000s Todd Helton, Matt Holliday and Carlos Gonzalez continued the offensive-minded tradition in Colorado, but pitching at 5,280 feet remained a major challenge; the fans, exhausted from the high-scoring defeats, began to stay home. The introduction of a humidor to deaden the baseball appeared to help, but so did better arms; it all came together in 2007 when the Rockies rode a white-hot wave of momentum into the playoffs, winning 21 of 22 games and sweeping through the first two postseason rounds before bowing to Boston in the World Series. Another impressive late run two years later ended in a disappointing first-round ousting.


2010s Bad times set back in as chronic injuries to Gonzalez, fellow All-Star Troy Tulowitzki and a fractured pitching staff hounded the Rockies, bottoming out in 2012 with a record-worst 98 losses as manager Jim Tracy panicked with a doomed four-man rotation and 75-pitch limit. Tracy successor Walt Weiss was next in line to tame the mile-high madness, with little success to date; poor owner-fan relations and an unpopular 2015 trade of Tulowitzki didn’t helped.