Cleveland Indians

Known as the Cleveland Blues, 1901-04, Cleveland Naps, 1905-14


Ballparks of the Indians
League Park (1901-09); League Park/Dunn Field (1910-1931, 1934-35; partial usage, 1932, 1936-46); Cleveland Stadium (1933, 1947-1993; partial usage, 1932, 1936-46); Jacobs Field/Progressive Field (1994-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates team record. * - World Series champion. # - American League champion. e - Eastern Division champion. c - Central Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1901 54 82 .397 29 7 .271 666 12 125 4.12 Ollie Pickering Earl Moore 131,380
1902 69 67 .507 14 5 .289 686 33 140 3.28 Bill Bradley Addie Joss 275,395
1903 77 63 .530 15 3 .265 639 31 175 2.73 Nap Lajoie Earl Moore 311,280
1904 86 65 .570 7.5 4 .260 647 27 178 2.22 Nap Lajoie Addie Joss 264,749
1905 76 78 .494 19 5 .255 564 18 188 2.85 Elmer Flick Addie Joss 316,306
1906 89 64 .582 5 3 .279 663 12 203 2.09 Nap Lajoie Addie Joss 325,733
1907 85 67 .559 8 4 .241 531 11 193 2.26 Elmer Flick Addie Joss 382,046
1908 90 64 .584 0.5 2 .239 569 18 177 2.02 Nap Lajoie Addie Joss 422,262
1909 71 82 .464 27.5 6 .241 493 10 173 2.40 Nap Lajoie Addie Joss 354,627
1910 71 81 .567 32 5 .244 548 9 189 2.88 Nap Lajoie Cy Falkenberg 293,456

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the Cleveland Indians?
Rocky Colavito > Matinee slugging idol and symbol of paradise lost for 1960s-era Cleveland fans who all but rioted upon his trade from Indians
Bob Feller > Supersonic ace debuted at 17 and amassed six 20-win campaigns and three no-hitters
Dick Jacobs > Free-spending owner who rescued Tribe from decades of gloom with new downtown ballpark and two AL pennants in 1990s
Nap Lajoie > AL’s first superstar hitter, so highly valued in Cleveland that team was named after him during his tenure


1911 80 73 .523 22 3 .282 693 20 209 3.36 Joe Jackson Vean Gregg 406,296
1912 75 78 .490 35.5 5 .273 677 12 194 3.30 Joe Jackson Vean Gregg 336,844
1913 86 66 .566 9.5 3 .268 633 16 191 2.54 Joe Jackson Cy Falkenberg 541,000
1914 51 102 .333 48.5 8 .245 538 10 167 3.21 Joe Jackson Bill Steen 185,997
1915 57 95 .375 44.5 7 .240 539 20 138 3.13 Ray Chapman Guy Morton 159,285
1916 77 77 .500 14 6 .250 630 16 160 2.90 Tris Speaker Jim Bagby 492,106
1917 88 66 .571 12 3 .245 584 13 210 2.52 Tris Speaker Stan Coveleski 477,298
1918 73 54 .575 2.5 2 .260 504 9 171 2.64 Tris Speaker Stan Coveleski 295,515
1919 84 55 .604 3.5 2 .278 636 25 117 2.94 Tris Speaker Stan Coveleski 538,135
1920 98 56 .636 --- #*1 .303 857 35 73 3.41 Tris Speaker Stan Coveleski 912,832
1921 94 60 .610 4.5 2 .308 925 42 51 3.90 Tris Speaker Stan Coveleski 748,705
1922 78 76 .506 16 4 .292 768 32 90 4.59 Tris Speaker George Uhle 528,145
1923 82 71 .536 16.5 3 .301 888 59 79 3.91 Tris Speaker George Uhle 558,856
1924 67 86 .438 24.5 6 .296 755 41 85 4.40 Joe Sewell Sherry Smith 481,905
1925 70 84 .455 27.5 6 .297 782 52 90 4.49 Tris Speaker Jake Miller 419,005
1926 88 66 .571 3 2 .289 738 27 88 3.40 George Burns George Uhle 627,426
1927 66 87 .431 43.5 6 .283 668 26 65 4.27 George Burns Jake Miller 373,138
1928 62 92 .403 39 7 .285 674 34 50 4.47 Joe Sewell Willis Hudlin 375,907
1929 81 71 .533 24 3 .294 717 62 75 4.05 Lew Fonseca Willis Hudlin 635,210
1930 81 73 .526 21 4 .304 890 72 51 4.88 Eddie Morgan Wes Ferrell 528,657
1931 78 76 .506 30 4 .296 885 71 63 4.63 Earl Averill Wes Ferrell 483,027
1932 87 65 .572 19 4 .285 845 74 52 4.12 Earl Averill Wes Ferrell 468,953
1933 75 76 .497 23.5 4 .261 654 50 36 3.71 Earl Averill Mel Harder 387,936
1934 85 69 .552 16 3 .287 814 100 52 4.28 Hal Trosky Mel Harder 391,338
1935 82 71 .536 12 3 .284 776 93 63 4.15 Joe Vosmik Mel Harder 397,615
1936 80 74 .519 22.5 5 .304 921 123 66 4.83 Earl Averill Johnny Allen 500,391
1937 83 71 .539 19 4 .280 817 103 78 4.39 Hal Trosky Johnny Allen 564,849
1938 86 66 .566 13 3 .281 847 113 83 4.60 Jeff Heath Mel Harder 652,006
1939 87 67 .565 20.5 3 .280 797 85 72 4.08 Hal Trosky Bob Feller 563,926
1940 89 65 .578 1 2 .265 710 101 53 3.63 Hal Trosky Bob Feller 902,576
1941 75 79 .487 26 T-4 .256 677 103 63 3.90 Jeff Heath Bob Feller 745,948

“Go up there and hit what you can see. If you can’t see it, come on back.”
—Advice from Washington Senators manager Bucky Harris on Cleveland fastball ace Bob Feller


1942 75 79 .487 28 4 .253 590 50 69 3.59 Les Fleming Jim Bagby Jr. 459,447
1943 82 71 .536 15.5 3 .255 600 55 47 3.15 Jeff Heath Jim Bagby Jr. 438,894
1944 72 82 .468 17 T-5 .266 643 70 48 3.65 Lou Boudreau Steve Gromek 475,272
1945 73 72 .503 11 5 .255 557 65 19 3.31 Jeff Heath Steve Gromek 558,182
1946 68 86 .442 36 6 .245 537 79 57 3.62 Hank Edwards Bob Feller 1,057,289
1947 80 74 .519 17 4 .259 687 112 29 3.44 Joe Gordon Bob Feller 1,521,978
1948 97 58 .626 --- #*1 .282 840 155 54 3.22 Joe Gordon Bob Lemon 2,620,627
1949 89 65 .578 8 3 .260 675 112 44 3.36 Lou Boudreau Bob Lemon 2,233,771
1950 92 62 .597 6 4 .269 706 164 40 3.75 Larry Doby Early Wynn 1,727,464
1951 93 61 .604 5 2 .256 696 140 52 3.38 Larry Doby Mike Garcia 1,704,984
1952 93 61 .604 2 2 .262 763 148 46 3.22 Larry Doby Bob Lemon 1,444,607
1953 92 62 .597 8.5 2 .270 770 160 33 3.64 Al Rosen Bob Lemon 1,069,176
1954 111 43 .721 --- #1 .262 746 156 30 2.78 Larry Doby Mike Garcia 1,335,472
1955 93 61 .604 3 2 .257 698 148 28 3.39 Al Smith Early Wynn 1,221,780
1956 88 66 .571 9 2 .244 712 153 40 3.32 Vic Wertz Herb Score 865,467
1957 76 77 .497 21.5 6 .252 682 140 40 4.06 Vic Wertz Ray Narleski 722,256
1958 77 76 .503 14.5 4 .258 694 161 50 3.73 Rocky Colavito Cal McLish 663,805
1959 89 65 .578 5 2 .263 745 167 33 3.75 Rocky Colavito Cal McLish 1,497,976
1960 76 78 .494 21 4 .267 667 127 58 3.95 Tito Francona Jim Perry 950,985
1961 78 83 .484 30.5 5 .266 737 150 34 4.15 Tito Francona Mudcat Grant 725,547
1962 80 82 .494 16 6 .245 682 180 35 4.14 John Romano Dick Donovan 716,076
1963 79 83 .488 25.5 T-5 .239 635 169 54 3.79 Max Alvis Jack Kralick 562,507
1964 79 83 .488 20 T-6 .247 689 164 79 3.75 Leon Wagner Sam McDowell 653,293
1965 87 75 .537 15 5 .250 663 156 109 3.30 Leon Wagner Sam McDowell 934,786
1966 81 81 .500 17 5 .237 574 155 53 3.23 Leon Wagner Sonny Siebert 903,359
1967 75 87 .463 17 8 .235 559 131 53 3.25 Max Alvis Steve Hargan 662,980
1968 86 75 .534 16.5 3 .234 516 75 115 2.66 Jose Cardenal Luis Tiant 857,994
1969 62 99 .385 46.5 6 .237 573 119 85 3.94 Tony Horton Sam McDowell 619,970
1970 76 86 .469 32 5 .249 649 183 25 3.91 Vada Pinson Sam McDowell 729,752
1971 60 102 .370 43 6 .238 543 109 57 4.28 Graig Nettles Sam McDowell 591,361
1972 72 84 .462 14 5 .234 472 91 49 2.92 Graig Nettles Gaylord Perry 626,354
1973 71 91 .438 26 6 .256 680 158 60 4.58 Buddy Bell Gaylord Perry 615,107
1974 77 85 .475 14 4 .255 662 131 79 3.80 Oscar Gamble Gaylord Perry 1,114,262
1975 79 80 .497 15.5 4 .261 688 153 106 3.84 Boog Powell Dennis Eckersley 977,039
1976 81 78 .509 16 4 .263 615 85 75 3.47 Rico Carty Jim Kern 948,776
1977 71 90 .441 28.5 5 .269 676 100 87 4.10 Andre Thornton Wayne Garland 900,365
1978 69 90 .434 29 6 .261 639 106 64 3.97 Andre Thornton Rick Waits 800,584
1979 81 80 .503 22 6 .258 760 138 143 4.57 Toby Harrah Sid Monge 1,011,644

“The Indians have only one difficulty. They’re the Indians.”
—Thomas Boswell, sportswriter


1980 79 81 .494 23 6 .277 738 89 118 4.68 Mike Hargrove Len Barker 1,033,827
1981 52 51 .505 7 6/5 .263 431 39 119 3.88 Toby Harrah Bert Blyleven 661,395
1982 78 84 .481 17 T-6 .262 683 109 151 4.11 Toby Harrah Rick Sutcliffe 1,044,021
1983 70 92 .432 28 7 .265 704 86 109 4.43 Andre Thornton Rick Sutcliffe 768,941
1984 75 87 .463 29 6 .265 761 123 126 4.26 Andre Thornton Bert Blyleven 734,079
1985 60 102 .370 39.5 7 .265 729 116 132 4.91 Brett Butler Bert Blyleven 655,181
1986 84 78 .519 11.5 5 .284 831 157 141 4.58 Joe Carter Tom Candiotti 1,471,805
1987 61 101 .377 37 7 .263 742 187 140 5.28 Joe Carter Doug Jones 1,077,898
1988 78 84 .481 11 6 .261 666 134 97 4.16 Joe Carter Greg Swindell 1,411,610
1989 73 89 .451 16 6 .245 604 127 74 3.65 Joe Carter Tom Candiotti 1,285,542

Bushers Book
1990 77 85 .475 11 4 .267 732 110 107 4.26 Candy Maldanado Doug Jones 1,225,240
1991 57 105 .352 34 7 .254 576 79 84 4.23 Carlos Baerga Greg Swindell 1,051,863
1992 76 86 .469 20 T-4 .266 674 127 144 4.11 Carlos Baerga Charles Nagy 1,224,094
1993 76 86 .469 19 6 .275 790 141 159 4.58 Albert Belle Eric Plunk 2,177,908
1994 66 47 .584 1 2 .290 679 167 131 4.36 Albert Belle Dennis Martinez 1,995,174
1995 100 44 .694 --- #c 1 .291 840 207 132 3.83 Albert Belle Jose Mesa 2,842,745
1996 99 62 .615 --- c 1 .293 952 218 160 4.36 Albert Belle Charles Nagy 3,318,174
1997 86 75 .534 --- #c 1 .286 868 220 118 4.73 Jim Thome Orel Hershiser 3,404,750
1998 89 73 .549 --- c 1 .272 850 198 143 4.45 Manny Ramirez Bartolo Colon 3,467,299
1999 97 65 .599 --- c 1 .289 1,009 203 147 4.90 Manny Ramirez Bartolo Colon 3,468,456
2000 90 72 .556 5 2 .288 950 221 113 4.84 Manny Ramirez Bartolo Colon 3,456,278
2001 91 71 .562 --- c 1 .278 897 212 79 4.64 Jim Thome Bob Wickman 3,175,523
2002 74 88 .457 20.5 3 .249 739 192 52 4.91 Jim Thome C.C. Sabathia 2,616,940
2003 68 94 .420 22 4 .254 699 158 86 4.21 Jody Gerut C.C. Sabathia 1,730,002
2004 80 82 .494 12 3 .276 858 184 94 4.81 Travis Hafner Jake Westbrook 1,814,401
2005 93 69 .574 6 2 .271 790 207 62 3.61 Travis Hafner Cliff Lee 2,013,763
2006 78 84 .481 18 4 .280 870 196 55 4.41 Travis Hafner C.C. Sabathia 1,997,995
2007 96 66 .593 --- c 1 .268 811 178 72 4.05 Grady SIzemore Fausto Carmona 2,275,912
2008 81 81 .500 7.5 3 .262 805 171 77 4.45 Grady SIzemore Cliff Lee 2,169,760
2009 65 97 .401 21.5 T-4 .264 773 161 84 5.06 Shin-Soo Choo Cliff Lee 1,766,242
2010 69 93 .426 25 4 .248 646 128 91 4.30 Shin-Soo Choo Fausto Carmona 1,391,644
2011 80 82 .494 15 2 .251 704 154 89 4.23 Asdrubal Cabrera Justin Masterson 1,840,835
2012 68 94 .420 20 4 .251 667 136 110 4.78 Shin-Soo Choo Carlos Perez 1,603,596
2013 92 70 .568 1 ! 2 .255 745 171 117 3.82 Jason Kipnis Justin Masterson 1,572,926
2014 85 77 .525 5 3 .253 669 142 104 3.56 Michael Brantley Corey Kluber 1,437,393
2015 81 80 .503 13.5 3 .256 669 141 86 3.67 Michael Brantley Carlos Carrasco 1,388,905
2016 94 67 .584 --- #c 1 .262 777 185 134 3.84 Carlos Santana Corey Kluber 1,591,667

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the Indians' History on This Great Game:

1910 baseball history1910: A Carload of Trouble The World Series becomes anticlimactic following a strange and controversial ending to the individual batting race between two of baseball's premier hitters: Cleveland's Nap Lajoie and Detroit's Ty Cobb.


1920 baseball history1920: Saviors of the Game In a year where Babe Ruth becomes king and the game is rocked by the Black Sox Scandal, the Indians traverse through tragedy and triumph to record their first-ever world title.


1948 baseball history1948: The Greatest Show in Cleveland Bill Veeck, the maverick owner of the Cleveland Indians, brings 'em through the gates with memorable attractions on and off the field.


1954 baseball history1954: At Least They Stopped the Yanks The Cleveland Indians go titanic and put a halt to the New York Yankees' five-year American League reign—but they fall short of a world title in October.


1994 baseball history1994: The Year That Should've Been A bitter and vastly unpopular player strike shuts down the season in August—and with it brings a cruel end to the Indians' first serious run at the postseason in 40 years.


1997 baseball history1997: A Blockbuster of a Binge The Indians try again to capture a long-sought championship for Cleveland, matching up in the World Series against a Florida Marlin team fueled by a reckless spending spree.


share this page with a friend Share this page with a friend.

Have a comment, question or request? Contact us at This Great Game.

© 2016 This Great Game.

The Indians by the Decade


1900s Starting out as the Blues and then the Naps when it lucked into superlative hitter Nap Lajoie (who escaped Philadelphia after a Pennsylvania state court ordered him to return to the rival National League), Cleveland warmed up through the decade with top-notch hitting courtesy of Lajoie and Elmer Flick, and the brilliant pitching of Addie Joss—who tragically succumbed to tubercular meningitis in 1911. The franchise came closest to an American League pennant in 1908 when it finished a mere half-game behind first-place Detroit.

1910s Lajoie faded and was dealt away after 1914—and the Naps became the Indians, it is said, in honor of Louis Sockalexis, the first Native American major leaguer. A change in branding did little to bolster a decade that was a mixed bag of more near-misses, a severe mid-decade funk and the presence of two genuine superstars: Joe Jackson and, shortly after his departure, Tris Speaker, who took over as player-manager in 1919 and presided over a brief rise to the top.


1920s The decade began with an emotional 1920 season that saw the on-field death of popular shortstop Ray Chapman, a 31-win performance by Jim Bagby and the franchise’s first pennant and World Series triumph. The offense continued to roll behind Speaker, impossible-to-whiff Joe Sewell, Charlie Jamieson and George Burns, but a lack of talented pitching beyond the presence of George Uhle doomed the Indians to the second division for the bulk of the period.


1930s Outside of a 75-76 mark in 1933, the Indians finished above .500 every year in the decade—but never finished closer than 12 games out of first place. Bouncing around between cozy League Park and cavernous Cleveland Stadium (which opened in 1932), the Indians continued to field strong offense behind a new wave of talent including Earl Averill and Hal Trosky, but it was pitcher Bob Feller who really turned heads in 1936 when he debuted for the Tribe as a 17-year old with a supersonic (yet sometimes erratic) fastball.


1940s The Indians became their own worst enemy in 1940 when a player mutiny (hardly the first in team history) torpedoed their own chances to take the AL pennant. Another maddening string of average results followed, but it finally all came together in 1948 under colorful owner Bill Veeck—whose endless, often outrageous promotional stunts shattered attendance records—as player-manager-MVP Lou Boudreau steered the Indians past one Boston team (a one-game playoff victory over the Red Sox) to win the AL pennant, then another (the Braves) to snag their last World Series crown to date.


1950s Behind a formidable rotation of Feller, Bob Lemon, Early Wynn and Mike Garcia, the Indians constantly stayed in the hunt for more AL flags—but five second-place finishes in a six-year period, all to the New York Yankees, led to repeated frustration. It took Cleveland a then AL-record 111 wins in 1954 to outlast the Yankees, but the euphoria of the breakthrough was punctured when the Tribe were swept by the New York Giants in the World Series. New ownership late in the decade unwisely cleaned out many of the key players on and off the field, sending the Indians back to mediocrity.


1960s Cleveland fans practically revolted in 1960 when beloved slugger Rocky Colavito was traded; the move set off a decade in which the Indians lacked serious star power at the plate with no threat to score—and thus, no threat to contend. That the Tribe even stuck around the .500 mark was a tribute to the team’s staunch pitching, highlighted by Sam McDowell’s abundant strikeout totals and Luis Tiant’s exceptional 1.60 earned run average in 1968.


1970s As the City of Cleveland decayed, so did the Indians, who settled into abysmal times to match the depressive state of their home. It all hit rock bottom in 1974 when the team inexplicably held Ten-Cent Beer Night at Cleveland Stadium, which resulted in a riot started by a surplus of drunkards. The decade’s few highlights included an excellent yet brief tenure for closet spitballer Gaylord Perry, the debut of Frank Robinson as the majors’ first black manager, and light-hitting shortstop Duane Kuiper’s one and only home run in 3,379 career at-bats.


1980s The long-suffering plight of the woebegone Indians reached pop-cultural status when a Hollywood movie (Major League) dared to dream of Cleveland winning an AL pennant. Sports Illustrated truly believed the idea itself and picked the Indians to reach the World Series in 1987; the team responded by losing 101 games. A strong offensive lineup (Joe Carter, Brett Butler, Julio Franco) did its best to give the Tribe promise, but lousy pitching constantly derailed such aspirations.


1990s The franchise (to say nothing of downtown Cleveland) came back to life with the 1994 opening of Jacobs Field—and soon after, the Indians sold out 455 consecutive games to set a major league record (since broken by Boston). The return to prominence resulted in an impressive mix of homegrown stars (Albert Belle, Jim Thome, Manny Ramirez, Charles Nagy) and shipped-in veterans (Omar Vizquel, Roberto Alomar, Orel Hershiser) that surged the Tribe to five straight divisional titles and their first two pennants in over 40 years—though World Series triumph remained out of reach with losses to Atlanta in 1995 and Florida in 1997.


2000s Owner Dick Jacobs, who oversaw the Indians’ rebirth, sold in 2000; under successor Larry Dolan, the collection of All-Star talent withered away, and fan support followed suit—with attendance dropping back below two million. The Tribe did enjoy one brief spike of success in mid-decade as sparkplug Grady Sizemore, slugger Travis Hafner and ace pitcher CC Sabathia took the Indians to the brink of an AL pennant in 2007—but blew a 3-1 ALCS lead against Boston. Otherwise, the Indians regressed back to bottom-feeder status as small-minded ownership took on a decidedly different tact from Jacobs’ approach.


2010s The Indians’ roster evolved into a healthy mix of bright young talent and reborn cast-offs, but the results were largely uneven and underwhelming to preseason “experts” who regularly predicted them to finish first. Then former Boston manager Terry Francona stepped in and maximized the optimism with one playoff appearance in 2013, and then a breakthrough AL pennant in 2016, bowing in the World Series with an injury-riddled roster that took the powerful Cubs to seven games and extra innings.