Cincinnati Reds

Known as the Cincinnati Red Stockings, 1882-83; Cincinnati Redlegs, 1953-58


Ballparks of the Reds
Bank Street Grounds (1882-83); League Park (1884-1901); Washington Park (partial usage, 1884); Palace of the Fans (1902-11); Redland Field/Crosley Field (1912-70); Riverfront Stadium/Cinergy Field (1970-2002); Great American Ball Park (2003-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates modern era (1900 or later) team record. * - World Series champion. # - League champion. w - Western Division champion. c - Central Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1882 55 25 .688 --- #1 .264 489 5   1.65 Hick Carpenter Will White  
1883 61 37 .622 5 3 .262 662 34   2.26 John Reilly Will White  
1884 68 41 .624 8 T-4 .254 754 36   3.33 John Reilly Will White  
1885 63 49 .563 16 2 .258 642 26   3.26 Charley Jones Larry McKeon  
1886 65 73 .471 27.5 5 .249 883 45 185 4.18 Bid McPhee Tony Mullane  
1887 81 54 .600 14 2 .268 892 37 527 3.58 John Reilly Mike Smith  
1888 80 54 .597 11.5 4 .242 745 32 469 2.73 John Reilly Lee Viau  
1889 76 63 .547 18 4 .270 897 43 252 3.50 Bug Holliday Jesse Duryea  
1890 77 55 .583 10.5 4 .259 753 27 312 2.79 John Reilly Billy Rhines 131,980
1891 56 81 .409 30.5 T-7 .242 646 40 244 3.55 Bug Holliday Billy Rhines 97,500
1892 82 68 .547 20 5 .241 766 44 270 3.17 Bug Holliday Frank Dwyer 196,473
1893 65 63 .508 20.5 T-6 .259 759 29 238 4.55 Bug Holliday Ice Box Chamberlain 194,250
1894 55 75 .423 35 10 .294 910 67 215 5.99 Bug Holliday Frank Dwyer 158,000
1895 66 64 .508 21 8 .298 903 36 326 4.81 Dusty Miller Frank Dwyer 281,000
1896 77 50 .606 12 3 .294 783 20 350 3.67 Dusty Miller Frabk Dwyer 373,000
1897 76 56 .576 17 4 .290 763 22 194 4.09 Jake Beckley Ted Breitenstein 336,800
1898 92 60 .605 11.5 3 .271 831 19 165 3.50 Mike Smith Pink Hawley 336,378
1899 83 67 .553 19 6 .275 856 13 228 3.70 Jake Beckley Noodles Hahn 259,536

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the Cincinnati Reds?
Sparky Anderson > Spirited players’ manager who oversaw the Big Red Machine’s dominance in the 1970s
Barry Larkin > Hall-of-Fame shortstop wildly embraced by Reds fans for his multi-faceted talents for nearly 20 years
Joe Morgan > Two-time MVP winner and sparkplug for the Big Red Machine, mixing power, patience and speed
Pete Rose > All-time hit king, still popular in Cincinnati in spite of his gambling controversies


1900 62 77 .446 21.5 7 .266 703 33 183 3.83 Jake Beckley Noodles Hahn 170,000
1901 52 87 .374 38 8 .251 561 38 137 4.17 Sam Crawford Noodles Hahn 205,728
1902 70 70 .500 33.5 4 .282 633 18 131 2.67 Sam Crawford Noodles Hahn 217,300
1903 74 65 .532 16.5 4 .288 765 28 151 3.07 Mike Donlin Noodles Hahn 351,680
1904 88 65 .575 18 3 .255 695 21 180 2.34 Joe Kelley Noodles Hahn 391,915
1905 79 74 .516 26 5 .269 736 27 181 3.01 Cy Seymour Bob Ewing 313,927
1906 64 87 .424 51.5 6 .238 533 16 170 2.69 Cy Seymour Jake Weimar 330,056
1907 66 87 .431 41.5 6 .247 526 15 158 2.41 Mike Mitchell Bob Ewing 317,500
1908 73 81 .474 26 5 .227 488 14 196 2.37 Hans Lobert Bob Ewing 399,200
1909 77 76 .503 33.5 4 .250 606 22 280 2.52 Mike Mitchell Art Fromme 424,643
1910 75 79 .487 29 5 .259 620 23 310 3.08 Mike Micthell George Suggs 380,622
1911 70 83 .458 29 6 .261 682 21 289 3.26 Bob Bescher Bobby Keefe 300,000
1912 75 78 .490 29 4 .256 656 21 248 3.42 Bob Bescher George Suggs 344,000
1913 64 89 .418 37.5 7 .261 607 27 226 3.46 Bob Bescher Chief Johnson 258,000
1914 60 94 .390 34.5 8 .236 530 16 224 2.94 Buck Herzog Phil Douglas 100,791
1915 71 83 .461 20 7 .253 516 15 156 2.84 Tommy Griffith Fred Toney 218,878
1916 69 93 .392 33.5 T-7 .254 505 14 157 3.10 Hal Chase Fred Toney 255,846
1917 78 76 .506 20 4 .264 601 26 153 2.70 Edd Roush Fred Toney 269,056
1918 68 60 .531 15.5 3 .278 530 15 128 3.00 Edd Roush Hod Eller 163,009
1919 96 44 .686 --- #*1 .263 577 20 143 2.23 Edd Roush Slim Sallee 532,501
1920 82 71 .536 10.5 3 .277 639 18 158 2.90 Edd Roush Dolf Luque 568,107
1921 70 83 .458 24 6 .278 618 20 117 3.46 Jake Daubert Eppa Rixey 311,227
1922 86 68 .558 7 2 .296 766 45 130 3.53 Jake Daubert Eppa Rixey 493,754
1923 91 63 .591 4.5 2 .285 708 45 96 3.21 Edd Roush Dolf Luque 575,063
1924 83 70 .542 10 4 .290 649 36 103 3.12 Edd Roush Eppa Rixey 473,707
1925 80 73 .523 15 3 .285 690 44 108 3.38 Edd Roush Pete Donohue 464,920
1926 87 67 .565 2 2 .290 747 35 51 3.42 Edd Roush Carl Mays 672,987
1927 75 78 .490 18.5 5 .278 643 29 62 3.54 Chuck Dressen Red Lucas 442,164
1928 78 74 .513 16 5 .280 648 32 83 3.94 Curt Walker Eppa Rixey 490,490
1929 66 88 .429 33 7 .281 686 34 134 4.41 Curt Walker Red Lucas 295,040
1930 59 95 .383 33 7 .281 665 74 48 5.08 Harry Heilmann Roy Kolp 386,727
1931 58 96 .377 43 8 .269 592 21 24 4.22 Tony Cuccinello Red Lucas 263,316
1932 60 94 .390 30 8 .263 575 47 35 3.79 Babe Herman Red Lucas 356,950
1933 58 94 .382 33 8 .246 496 34 30 3.42 Chick Hafey Red Lucas 218,281
1934 52 99 .344 42 8 .266 590 55 34 4.37 Chick Hafey Benny Frey 206,773
1935 68 85 .444 31.5 6 .265 646 73 72 4.30 Ival Goodman Paul Derringer 448,247
1936 74 80 .481 18 5 .274 722 82 68 4.22 Kiki Cuyler Paul Derringer 466,345
1937 56 98 .364 40 8 .254 612 73 53 3.94 Ival Goodman Lee Grissom 411,221
1938 82 68 .547 6 4 .277 723 110 19 3.62 Ival Goodman Paul Derringer 706,756
1939 97 57 .630 --- #1 .278 767 97 46 3.27 Frank McCormick Bucky Walters 981,443
1940 100 53 .654 --- #*1 .266 707 89 72 3.05 Frank McCormick Bucky Walters 850,180

“Cincinnati is nuts with baseball! They ought to call this town Cincinnutty!”
—Sportswriter Bugs Baer


1941 88 66 .571 12 3 .247 616 64 68 3.17 Frank McCormick Elmer Riddle 643,513
1942 76 76 .500 29 4 .231 527 66 42 2.82 Frank McCormick Johnny Vander Meer 427,031
1943 87 67 .565 18 2 .256 608 43 49 3.13 Eric Tipton Elmer Riddle 379,122
1944 89 65 .578 16 3 .254 573 51 51 2.97 Frank McCormick Bucky Walters 409,567
1945 61 93 .396 37 7 .249 536 56 71 4.00 Frank McCormick Bucky Walters 290,070
1946 67 87 .435 30 6 .239 523 65 82 3.08 Grady Hatton Ewell Blackwell 715,751
1947 73 81 .474 21 5 .259 681 95 46 4.41 Grady Hatton Ewell Blackwell 899,975
1948 64 89 .418 27 7 .247 588 104 42 4.47 Hank Sauer Johnny Vander Meer 823,386
1949 62 92 .403 35 7 .260 627 86 31 4.34 Grady Hatton Ken Raffensberger 707,782
1950 66 87 .431 24.5 6 .260 654 99 37 4.32 Ted Kluszewski Ewell Blackwell 538,794
1951 68 86 .442 28.5 6 .248 559 88 44 3.70 Johnny Wyrostek Ken Raffensberger 588,268
1952 69 85 448 27.5 6 .249 615 104 32 4.01 Ted Kluszewski Ken Raffensberger 604,197
1953 68 86 .442 37 6 .261 714 166 25 4.64 Ted Kluszewski Fred Baczewski 548,086
1954 74 80 .481 23 5 .262 729 147 47 4.50 Ted Kluszewski Art Fowler 704,167
1955 75 79 .487 23.5 5 .270 761 181 51 3.95 Ted Kluszewski Joe Nuxhall 693,662
1956 91 63 .591 2 3 .266 775 221 45 3.85 Frank Robinson Hersh Freeman 1,125,928
1957 80 74 .519 15 4 .269 747 187 51 4.62 Frank Robinson Brooks Lawrence 1,070,850
1958 76 78 .494 16 4 .258 695 123 61 3.73 Frank Robinson Bob Purkey 788,582
1959 74 80 .481 13 T-5 .274 764 161 65 4.31 Frank Robinson Don Newcombe 801,298
1960 67 87 .435 28 6 .250 640 140 73 4.00 Frank Robinson Bob Purkey 663,486
1961 93 61 .604 --- #1 .270 710 158 70 3.78 Frank Robinson Jim O'Toole 1,117,603
1962 98 64 .605 3.5 3 .270 802 167 66 3.75 Frank Robinson Bob Purkey 982,095
1963 86 76 .531 13 5 .246 648 122 92 3.29 Vada Pinson Jim Maloney 858,805
1964 92 70 .568 1 T-2 .249 660 130 90 3.07 Frank Robinson Jim O'Toole 862,466
1965 89 73 .549 8 4 .273 825 183 82 3.88 Frank Robinson Jim Maloney 1,047,824

Bushers Book
1966 76 84 .475 18 7 .260 692 149 70 4.08 Pete Rose Jim Maloney 742,958
1967 87 75 .537 14.5 4 .248 604 109 92 3.05 Pete Rose Ted Abernathy 958,300
1968 83 79 .512 14 4 .273 690 106 59 3.56 Pete Rose Clay Carroll 733,354
1969 89 73 .549 4 3 .277 798 171 79 4.11 Pete Rose Jim Maloney 987,991
1970 102 60 .630 --- #w 1 .270 775 191 115 3.69 Tony Perez Wayne Simpson 1,803,568
1971 79 83 .488 11 T-4 .241 586 138 59 3.35 Lee May Don Gullett 1,501,122
1972 95 59 .617 --- #w 1 .251 707 124 140 3.21 Joe Morgan Gary Nolan 1,611,459
1973 99 63 .611 --- w 1 .254 741 137 148 3.40 Joe Morgan Jack Billingham 2,017,601
1974 98 64 .605 4 2 .260 776 135 146 3.41 Joe Morgan Don Gullett 2,164,307
1975 108 54 .667 --- #*w 1 .271 840 124 168 3.37 Joe Morgan Gary Nolan 2,315,603
1976 102 60 .630 --- #*w 1 .280 857 141 210 3.51 Joe Morgan Pat Zachry 2,629,708
1977 88 74 .543 10 2 .274 802 181 170 4.21 George Foster Tom Seaver 2,519,670
1978 92 69 .571 2.5 2 .256 710 136 137 3.81 George Foster Tom Seaver 2,532,497
1979 90 71 .559 --- w 1 .264 731 132 99 3.58 George Foster Tom Seaver 2,356,933
1980 89 73 .549 3.5 3 .262 707 113 156 3.85 Ken Griffey Frank Pastore 2,022,350
1981 66 42 .611 --- 2/2 .267 464 64 58 3.73 George Foster Tom Seaver 1,093,730
1982 61 101 .377 28 6 .251 545 82 131 3.66 Dan Driessen Mario Soto 1,326,528
1983 74 88 .457 17 6 .239 623 107 154 3.98 Gary Redus Mario Soto 1,190,419
1984 70 92 .432 22 5 .244 627 106 160 4.16 Dave Parker Mario Soto 1,275,887

“Pete Rose is the most likeable arrogant person I’ve ever met.”
—Mike Schmidt


1985 89 72 .553 5.5 2 .255 677 114 159 3.71 Dave Parker Tom Browning 1,834,619
1986 86 76 .531 10 2 .254 732 144 177 3.91 Dave Parker Bill Gullickson 1,692,432
1987 84 78 .519 6 2 .266 783 192 169 4.24 Eric Davis John Franco 2,185,205
1988 87 74 .540 7 2 .246 641 122 207 3.35 Eric Davis Danny Jackson 2,072,528
1989 75 87 .463 17 5 .247 632 128 128 3.73 Eric Davis Tom Browning 1,979,320
1990 91 71 .562 --- #*w 1 .265 693 125 166 3.39 Eric Davis Jose Rijo 2,400,892
1991 74 88 .457 20 5 .258 689 164 124 3.83 Barry Larkin Jose Rijo 2,372,377
1992 90 72 .556 8 2 .260 660 99 125 3.46 Bip Roberts Jose Rijo 2,315,946
1993 73 89 .451 31 5 .264 722 137 142 4.51 Reggie Sanders Jose Rijo 2,453,232
1994 66 48 .579 --- c 1 .286 609 124 119 3.78 Kevin Mitchell John Smiley 1,897,681
1995 85 59 .590 --- c 1 .270 747 161 190 4.03 Reggie Sanders Pete Schourek 1,837,649
1996 81 81 .500 7 3 .256 778 191 171 4.33 Barry Larkin Jeff Brantley 1,861,428
1997 76 86 .469 8 3 .253 651 142 190 4.42 Willie Greene Jeff Shaw 1,785,788
1998 77 85 .475 25 4 .262 750 138 95 4.44 Barry Larkin Pete Harnisch 1,793,649
1999 96 67 .589 1.5 2 .272 865 209 164 3.99 Sean Casey Scott Williamson 2,061,222
2000 85 77 .525 10 2 .274 825 200 100 4.33 Ken Griffey Jr. Danny Graves 2,577,371
2001 66 96 .407 27 5 .262 735 176 103 4.77 Sean Casey Danny Graves 1,879,757
2002 78 84 .481 19 3 .253 709 169 116 4.27 Adam Dunn Elmer Dessens 1,855,787
2003 69 93 .426 19 5 .245 694 182 80 5.09 Sean Casey Chris Reitsma 2,355,259
2004 76 86 .469 29 4 .250 750 194 77 5.19 Adam Dunn Paul Wilson 2,287,250
2005 73 89 .451 27 5 .261 820 222 72 5.15 Adam Dunn Aaron Harang 1,943,067
2006 80 82 .494 3.5 3 .257 749 217 124 4.51 Adam Dunn Bronson Arroyo 2,134,607
2007 72 90 .444 13 5 .267 783 204 97 4.94 Adam Dunn Aaron Harang 2,058,593
2008 74 88 .457 23.5 5 .247 704 187 85 4.55 Joey Votto Edinson Volquez 2,058,632
2009 78 84 .481 13 4 .257 673 158 96 4.18 Joey Votto Francisco Cordero 1,747,919
2010 91 71 .562 --- c 1 .272 790 188 93 4.01 Joey Votto Francisco Cordero 2,060,550
2011 79 83 .488 17 3 .256 735 183 97 4.16 Joey Votto Francisco Cordero 2,213,588
2012 97 65 .599 --- c 1 .251 669 172 87 3.34 Jay Bruce Johnny Cueto 2,347,251
2013 90 72 .556 7 ! 3 .249 698 155 67 3.38 Joey Votto Aroldis Chapman 2,534,369
2014 76 86 .469 14 4 .238 595 131 122 3.59 Todd Frazier Johnny Cueto 2,476,664
2015 64 98 .395 36 5 .248 640 167 134 4.33 Joey Votto Aroldis Chapman 2,419,506
2016 68 94 .420 35.5 5 .256 716 164 139 4.91 Joey Votto Dan Straily 1,894,085

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the Reds' History on This Great Game:

1919 baseball history1919: Say it Ain't So The Reds defeat the Chicago White Sox in a best-of-nine World Series under suspicious circumstances, as rumors fly of gamblers bribing crucial Chicago players to throw the games.


1940 baseball history1940: Victorious Healings The Reds and Detroit Tigers, two teams coping with personal loss, dedicate themselves toward winning a World Series title.


1970 baseball history1970: One for the Brooks In a preview of the decade to come, the Reds and Baltimore Orioles dominate and square off in the World Series—highlighted by Oriole third baseman Brooks Robinson's defensive heroics.


1975 baseball history1975: Birth of a Renaissance America's passion for baseball is re-awakened with, arguably, the greatest World Series ever between Boston and Cincinnati.


1989 baseball history1989: Of Triumph and Tragedy In a rough year for the game, Pete Rose is banned, a popular commissioner dies, Dave Dravecky's comeback bid is abruptly stopped cold, and the local euphoria of a Bay Area World Series turns horrific when a major earthquake strikes before Game Two.


1990 baseball history1990: The Dynasty Dies Nasty Armed with a tough, rough and rowdy trio of relievers, the Cincinnati Reds knock off the almighty Oakland A's.


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The Reds by the Decade


19th Century Not to be confused with baseball’s first professional team which at one point won up to 130 straight games (facts and recollections vary), or the National League team that lasted from 1876-80, the Reds truly debuted along with the rest of the American Association in 1882, winning the league’s inaugural pennant. But that would become their only taste of championship glory for the century, settling into a middle-of-the-pack existence after transferring to the NL in 1890. The one constant for the Reds throughout these times would be immaculate defenseman Bid McPhee, who still owns the record for most career putouts by a second baseman—almost all of them achieved barehanded.


1900s The Reds maintained a marginal existence through the decade, turning in mostly marginal results. Hitting talent came and (mostly) went, with top-line stars Sam Crawford and Mike Donlin moving on to bigger stages; on the mound, the Reds lacked stellar pitching beyond the tireless exploits of workhorse ace Noodles Hahn. Starting in 1902, the Reds played out of the Palace of the Fans, a unique, garish nod to neo-classicism with field-level suites that were the forerunner to the modern luxury box (it was torn down after 1911).


1910s Average at best, the Reds suffered through eight straight losing seasons before changes began in 1917 with the emergence of hitting stars Edd Roush, Heinie Groh and solid supporting pitching to back up ace Fred Toney. After never having finished no closer than 11 games out of first place since rejoining the National League in 1890, the Reds finally brought home a pennant in 1919 with a steamrolling 96-44 performance—and then were literally handed a world championship by a half-honest Chicago White Sox team.


1920s The winning vibe continued with several second-place finishes (but no league titles) before the sobering 1924 death of manager Pat Moran, who had helped bring the Reds back to respectability. Whenever he wasn’t holding out, Roush continued to lift an offense that otherwise struggled to conform to the newborn live ball era—but an exceptional pitching rotation that featured Eppa Rixey, Dolf Luque and Pete Donohue made it up, often pitching as if the deadball era was still in vogue.


1930s The Great Depression severely crippled the finances of Cincinnati ownership and its ability to build a winner, sinking the Reds to four last-place finishes from 1931-34. An inevitable change in the front office brought in the innovative Larry MacPhail—who in Cincinnati introduced night baseball and season tickets to the majors—and Frank Lane to build up the farm system. The fans responded, and eventually so did the team—winning the first of two straight pennants in 1939 behind the leadership of catcher Ernie Lombradi and the outstanding one-two pitching punch of Bucky Walters and Paul Derringer.


1940s After winning their second-ever world title (and their first without the opponent laying down) in 1940, the Reds remained competitive during the war years—but the return to peace dropped the club back to second-division obscurity as a new wave of talent failed to materialize; aging stars from the 1930s (Walters, pitcher Johnny Vander Meer and star hitter Frank McCormick) did well to keep the team afloat while performing on borrowed time.


1950s The malaise lasted through mid-decade even as the Reds made various adjustments to the times; they brought in the fences at Crosley Field and turned Ted Kluszewski—the bicep-fueled slugger who began the no-sleeve movement—into a major home run threat, and in 1953 they changed their name to the Redlegs to avoid comparison with the hated Soviet Union (they changed it back to Reds in 1959). The arrival of Frank Robinson in 1956 transformed Cincinnati into an even bigger longball threat and a franchise no longer to be taken lightly.


1960s Blessed with young pitching arms in Bob Purkey, Jim O’Toole, Joey Jay and Jim Maloney, the Reds constantly remained above the .500 mark during a highly competitive decade in the NL and took home one pennant in 1961 before being flattened in the World Series by the New York Yankees of Maris and Mantle. Sharp hitting continued and was immune to the oppressive pitching of the late 1960s thanks to the emergence of hitting machine Pete Rose—joined at decade’s end by catcher Johnny Bench and infielder Tony Perez to help give birth to a dynasty.


1970s Set up in a modern new stadium, improved further by insightful trades and motivated by feisty skipper Sparky Anderson, the “Big Red Machine” hit all cylinders and dominated the decade, winning six NL West titles, four pennants and back-to-back World Series, most memorably with a classic seven-game triumph over Boston in 1975. Second baseman Joe Morgan, brought in from Houston, surged to Hall-of-Fame form and won two MVPs, followed by George Foster’s herculean numbers late in the decade. The town came alive with Reds fever and set attendance records that still stand.


1980s The decade got off to a quirky start when the Reds failed to qualify for the postseason in the strike-torn, split-seasoned 1981 campaign despite owning the majors’ best record; just a year later, they collapsed to a NL-worst 101 losses. Cincinnati rebounded with a rehabbed Dave Parker and the excitingly talented (yet injury-prone) Eric Davis, becoming an annual threat late in the decade after Rose returned and became player-manager, breaking Ty Cobb’s all-time career hit mark and leading the team to four straight second-place finishes—all before being called out and banned from the game in 1989 for making bets on his own team to win.


1990s From the ashes of the Rose scandal, the Reds instantly climbed back to championship stature with a stunning four-game World Series sweep of Oakland in 1990 behind manager Lou Piniella and the famed “Nasty Boys” bullpen consisting of Ron Dibble, Norm Charlton and Randy Myers. The rest of the decade had more than its fair share of ups-and-downs for the Reds; they were again jobbed out of a strike-affected postseason spot in 1994, reached the NLCS in 1995 behind shortstop Barry Larkin’s MVP effort and tolerated the often insensitive remarks of team owner Marge Schott, who MLB frantically tried to oust (she finally sold in 1999).


2000s Neither the 2000 trade for Ken Griffey Jr. (who endured through an injury-riddled tenure in Cincinnati) nor the move to baseball-specific Great American Ballpark in 2003 failed to give the Reds a spike either in the standings or at the gate, as the team ran off nine straight losing seasons and attendance stayed flat despite the new digs, which yielded more offense and home runs than exhausted pitchers had anticipated.


2010s Lean times gave way to contention as the Reds made the playoffs three times in the first four years of the 2010s—but failure to advance past the first round soured the atmosphere and added to manager Dusty Baker’s utter October frustrations, leading to his 2013 dismissal. The marquee looks appealing with first baseman (and 2010 MVP) Joey Votto, yet the Reds have regressed back to second division status and look to reload with a bevy of young starting pitchers.


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