Chicago White Sox

Known as the Chicago White Stockings, 1901-03


Ballparks of the White Sox
South Side Park (1901-09; partial use, 1910); White Sox Park/Comiskey Park (1910-90); New Comiskey Park/U.S. Cellular Field/Guaranteed Rate Field (1991-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates team record. * - World Series champion. # - American League champion. w - Western Division champion. c - Central Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1901 83 53 .610 --- #1 .276 819 32 280 2.98 Fielder Jones Clark Griffith 354,350
1902 74 60 .552 8 4 .268 675 14 265 3.41 George Davis Ned Garvin 337,898
1903 60 77 .438 30.5 7 .247 516 14 180 3.02 Danny Green Doc White 286,183
1904 89 65 .578 6 3 .242 600 14 216 2.30 Danny Green Frank Owen 557,123
1905 92 60 .605 2 2 .237 612 11 194 1.99 Jiggs Donahue Nick Altrock 687,419
1906 93 58 .616 --- #*1 .230 570 7 216 2.13 George Davis Ed Walsh 585,202
1907 87 64 .576 5.5 3 .238 588 5 175 2.22 Eddie Hahn Ed Walsh 666,307
1908 88 64 .579 1.5 3 .224 537 3 209 2.22 Patsy Dougherty Ed Walsh 636,096
1909 78 74 .513 20 4 .221 492 4 211 2.05 Patsy Dougherty Frank Smith 478,400
1910 68 85 .444 35.5 6 .211 457 7 183 2.03 Patsy Dougherty Ed Walsh 552,084

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the Chicago White Sox?
Luke Appling > Franchise leader in hits and a reliable constant at shortstop for 20 years in Chicago
Charles Comiskey > Original owner and pivotal power broker in AL’s early years; Black Sox Scandal initiated his downfall
Frank Thomas > Far and away the most awesome offensive force in White Sox history, ruled the steroid era without taking PEDs
Ed Walsh > Deadball era ace epitomized über-workhorse ethic of times; had crucial role in design of Comiskey Park


1911 77 74 .510 24 4 .269 718 20 201 2.97 Harry Lord Ed Walsh 583,208
1912 78 76 .506 28 4 .255 639 17 213 3.06 Shano Collins Ed Walsh 602,241
1913 78 74 .513 17.5 5 .236 488 24 156 2.33 Harry Lord Reb Russell 644,501
1914 70 84 .455 30 T-6 .239 487 19 167 2.48 Shano Collins Joe Benz 469,290
1915 93 61 .604 9.5 3 .258 717 25 233 2.43 Eddie Collins Jim Scott 539,461
1916 89 65 .578 2 2 .251 601 17 197 2.36 Joe Jackson Reb Russell 679,923
1917 100 54 .649 --- #*1 .253 655 18 219 2.16 Eddie Collins Eddie Cicotte 684,521
1918 57 67 .460 17 6 .256 457 8 119 2.73 Eddie Collins Reb Russell 195,081
1919 88 52 .629 --- #1 .287 667 25 150 3.04 Joe Jackson Eddie Cicotte 627,186
1920 96 58 .623 2 2 .295 794 37 109 3.59 Joe Jackson Red Faber 833,492
1921 62 92 .403 36.5 7 .283 683 35 94 4.94 Harry Hooper Red Faber 543,650
1922 77 77 .500 17 5 .278 691 45 109 3.94 Harry Hooper Red Faber 602,860
1923 69 85 .448 30 7 .279 692 42 191 4.05 Eddie Collins Red Faber 573,778
1924 66 87 .431 25.5 8 .288 793 41 137 4.74 Eddie Collins Sloppy Thurston 606,658
1925 79 75 .513 18.5 5 .284 811 38 131 4.29 Eddie Collins Ted Lyons 832,231
1926 81 72 .529 9.5 5 .289 730 32 123 3.74 Johnny Mostil Ted Lyons 710,339
1927 70 83 .458 39.5 5 .278 662 36 89 3.91 Bibb Falk Ted Lyons 614,423
1928 72 82 .468 29 5 .270 656 24 144 3.98 Willie Kamm Tommy Thomas 494,152
1929 59 93 .388 46 7 .268 627 37 109 4.41 Carl Reynolds Tommy Thomas 426,795
1930 62 92 .403 40 7 .276 729 63 74 4.71 Carl Reynolds Ted Lyons 406,123
1931 56 97 .366 51.5 8 .260 704 27 94 5.04 Lu Blue Red Faber 403,550
1932 49 102 .325 56.5 7 .267 667 36 89 4.82 Red Kress Ted Lyons 233,198
1933 67 83 .447 31 6 .272 683 43 43 4.45 Al Simmons Joe Heving 397,789
1934 53 99 .349 47 8 .263 704 71 36 5.41 Al Simmons George Earnshaw 236,559
1935 74 78 .487 19.5 5 .275 738 74 46 4.38 Zeke Bonura Ted Lyons 470,281
1936 81 70 .536 20 3 .292 920 60 66 5.06 Zeke Bonura Vern Kennedy 440,810
1937 86 68 .558 16 3 .280 780 67 70 4.17 Zeke Bonura Monte Stratton 589,235
1938 65 83 .439 32 6 .277 709 67 56 4.36 Gee Walker Thornton Lee 338,278
1939 85 69 .552 22.5 4 .275 755 64 113 4.31 Gee Walker Ted Lyons 594,104
1940 82 72 .532 8 T-4 .278 735 73 52 3.74 Joe Kuhel Johnny Rigney 550,336
1941 77 77 .500 24 3 .255 638 47 91 3.52 Taffy Wright Thornton Lee 677,077
1942 66 82 .446 34 6 .246 538 25 114 3.58 Wally Moses Ted Lyons 425,734
1943 82 72 .532 16 4 .247 573 33 173 3.20 Luke Appling Orval Grove 508,962
1944 71 83 .461 18 7 .247 543 23 66 3.58 Wally Moses Joe Haynes 563,539
1945 71 78 .477 15 6 .262 596 22 78 3.69 Wally Moses Thornton Lee 657,981
1946 74 80 .481 30 5 .257 562 37 78 3.10 Luke Appling Eddie Lopat 983,403
1947 70 84 .455 27 6 .256 553 53 91 3.64 Luke Appling Joe Haynes 876,948
1948 51 101 .336 44.5 8 .251 559 55 46 4.89 Luke Appling Bill Wight 777,844
1949 63 91 .409 34 6 .257 648 43 62 4.30 Cass Michaels Bill Wight 937,151

“This place was built on a dump. One day, I dug up an old blue-and-white coffee cup out at shortstop. They had to stop the game and come out with a couple shovels of dirt.”
—White Sox shortstop Luke Appling on Comiskey Park


1950 60 94 .390 38 6 .260 625 93 19 4.41 Eddie Robinson Bill Wight 781,330
1951 81 73 .526 17 4 .270 714 86 99 3.50 Eddie Robinson Billy Pierce 1,328,234
1952 81 73 .526 14 3 .252 610 80 61 3.25 Eddie Robinson Billy Pierce 1,231,675
1953 89 65 .578 11.5 3 .258 716 74 73 3.41 Minnie Minoso Billy Pierce 1,191,353
1954 94 60 .610 17 3 .267 711 94 98 3.05 Minnie Minoso Virgil Trucks 1,231,629
1955 91 63 .591 5 3 .268 725 116 69 3.37 Nellie Fox Billy Pierce 1,175,684
1956 85 69 .552 12 3 .267 776 128 70 3.73 Minnie Minoso Jack Harshman 1,000,090
1957 90 64 .584 8 2 .260 707 106 109 3.35 Minnie Minoso Dick Donovan 1,135,668
1958 82 72 .532 10 2 .257 634 101 101 3.61 Jim Landis Billy Pierce 797,451
1959 94 60 .610 --- #1 .250 669 97 113 3.29 Nellie Fox Bob Shaw 1,423,144
1960 87 67 .565 10 3 .270 741 112 122 3.60 Roy Sievers Frank Baumann 1,644,460
1961 86 76 .531 23 4 .265 765 138 100 4.06 Roy Sievers Juan Pizarro 1,146,019
1962 85 77 .525 11 5 .257 707 92 76 3.73 Floyd Robinson Ray Herbert 1,131,562
1963 94 68 .580 10.5 2 .250 683 114 64 2.97 Pete Ward Gary Peters 1,158,848
1964 98 64 .605 1 2 .247 642 106 75 2.72 Pete Ward Gary Peters 1,250,053
1965 95 67 .586 7 2 .246 647 125 50 2.99 Don Buford Eddie Fisher 1,130,519
1966 83 79 .512 15 4 .231 574 87 153 2.68 Tommie Agee Gary Peters 990,016
1967 89 73 .549 3 4 .225 531 89 124 2.45 Tommie Agee Joe Horlen 985,634
1968 67 95 .414 36 T-8 .228 463 71 90 2.75 Tommy McCraw Tommy John 803,775
1969 68 94 .420 29 5 .247 625 112 54 4.21 Bill Melton Tommy John 589,546
1970 56 106 .346 42 6 .253 633 123 53 4.54 Bill Melton Tommy John 495,355
1971 79 83 .488 22.5 3 .250 617 138 83 3.12 Bill Melton Wilbur Wood 833,891
1972 87 67 .565 5.5 2 .238 566 108 100 3.12 Dick Allen Wilbur Wood 1,177,318
1973 77 85 .475 17 5 .256 625 111 83 3.86 Bill Melton Wilbur Wood 1,302,527
1974 80 80 .500 9 4 .268 684 135 64 3.94 Dick Allen Jim Kaat 1,149,596
1975 75 86 .466 22.5 5 .255 655 94 101 3.93 Jorge Orta Jim Kaat 750,802
1976 64 97 .398 25.5 6 .255 586 73 120 4.25 Jorge Orta Ken Brett 914,945
1977 90 72 .556 12 3 .278 844 192 42 4.25 Richie Zisk Lerrin LaGrow 1,657,135
1978 71 90 .441 20.5 5 .264 634 106 83 4.21 Eric Soderholm Francisco Barrios 1,491,100
1979 73 87 .456 14 5 .275 730 127 97 4.10 Chet Lemon Ken Kravec 1,280,702

Bushers Book
1980 70 90 .438 26 5 .259 587 91 68 3.92 Chet Lemon Britt Burns 1,200,365
1981 54 52 .509 8.5 3/6 .272 476 76 86 3.47 Chet Lemon Dennis Lamp 946,651
1982 87 75 .537 6 3 .273 786 136 136 3.87 Greg Luzinski LaMarr Hoyt 1,567,787
1983 99 63 .611 --- w 1 .262 800 157 165 3.67 Carlton Fisk LaMarr Hoyt 2,132,821
1984 74 88 .457 10 T-5 .247 679 172 109 4.13 Harold Baines Richard Dotson 2,136,988
1985 85 77 .525 6 3 .253 736 146 108 4.07 Carlton Fisk Bob James 1,669,888
1986 72 90 .444 20 5 .247 644 121 115 3.93 Harold Baines Floyd Bannister 1,424,313
1987 77 85 .475 8 5 .258 748 173 138 4.30 Ivan Calderon Floyd Bannister 1,208,060
1988 71 90 .441 32.5 5 .244 631 132 98 4.12 Harold Baines Jerry Reuss 1,115,749
1989 69 92 .429 29.5 7 .271 693 94 97 4.23 Ivan Calderon Bobby Thigpen 1,045,651
1990 94 68 .580 9 2 .258 682 106 140 3.61 Ivan Calderon Bobby Thigpen 2,002,357
1991 87 75 .537 8 2 .262 758 139 134 3.79 Frank Thomas Jack McDowell 2,934,154
1992 86 76 .531 10 3 .261 738 110 160 3.82 Frank Thomas Jack McDowell 2,681,156
1993 94 68 .580 --- w 1 .265 776 162 106 3.70 Frank Thomas Jack McDowell 2,581,091
1994 67 46 .593 --- c 1 .287 633 121 77 3.95 Frank Thomas Wilson Alvarez 1,697,398
1995 68 76 .472 30 3 .280 755 146 110 4.85 Frank Thomas Alex Fernandez 1,609,773
1996 85 77 .525 14.5 2 .281 898 195 105 4.53 Frank Thomas Alex Fernandez 1,676,403
1997 80 81 .497 6 2 .273 779 158 106 4.74 Frank Thomas Roberto Hernandez 1,864,782
1998 80 82 .494 9 2 .271 861 198 127 5.24 Albert Belle Mike Sirotka 1,391,146
1999 75 86 .466 21.5 2 .277 777 162 110 4.92 Magglio Ordonez Mike Sirotka 1,338,851

“The guy causes fear just standing at the on-deck circle.”
—Nick Swisher on White Sox slugger Frank Thomas


2000 95 67 .586 --- c 1 .286 978 216 119 4.66 Frank Thomas Mike Sirotka 1,947,799
2001 83 79 .512 8 3 .268 798 214 123 4.55 Magglio Ordonez Kaith Foulke 1,766,172
2002 81 81 .500 13.5 2 .268 856 217 75 4.53 Magglio Ordonez Mark Buehrle 1,676,911
2003 86 76 .531 4 2 .263 791 220 77 4.17 Magglio Ordonez Esteban Loaiza 1,939,524
2004 83 79 .512 9 2 .268 865 242 78 4.91 Carlos Lee Mark Buehrle 1,930,537
2005 99 63 .611 --- #*c 1 .262 741 200 137 3.61 Paul Konerko Mark Buehrle 2,342,833
2006 90 72 .556 6 3 .280 868 236 93 4.61 Jermaine Dye Bobby Jenks 2,957,414
2007 72 90 .444 24 4 .246 693 190 78 4.77 Jim Thome Bobby Jenks 2,684,395
2008 89 74 .546 --- c 1 .263 811 235 67 4.06 Carlos Quentin John Danks 2,500,648
2009 79 83 .488 7.5 3 .258 724 184 113 4.14 Paul Konerko Mark Buehrle 2,284,163
2010 88 74 .543 6 2 .268 752 177 160 4.09 Paul Konerko John Danks 2,194,378
2011 79 83 .488 16 3 .252 654 154 81 4.10 Paul Konerko Mark Buehrle 2,001,117
2012 85 77 .525 3 2 .255 748 211 109 4.02 Alex Rios Chris Sale 1,965,955
2013 63 99 .389 30 5 .249 598 148 105 3.98 Alejandro De Aza Chris Sale 1,768,413
2014 73 89 .451 17 4 .253 660 155 85 4.29 Jose Abreu Chris Sale 1,650,821
2015 76 86 .469 19 4 .250 622 136 68 3.98 Jose Abreu Chris Sale 1,755,810
2016 78 84 .481 16.5 4 .257 686 168 77 4.10 Adam Eaton Chris Sale 1,746,293

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the White Sox' History on This Great Game:

1906 baseball history1906: The Hitless Wonders How the White Sox bat .230 with seven home runs all year—and still become world champions.


1917 baseball history1917: Clean Sox The White Sox—the team that would throw the 1919 World Series—plays it strong and honest against the New York Giants.


1919 baseball history1919: Say it Ain't So Eight members of the White Sox plot the unthinkable and throw the World Series against Cincinnati.


1959 baseball history1959: Reinventing Dodger After a lackluster California debut, the Los Angeles Dodgers victoriously adapt to their new surroundings and topple to "Go-Go" Sox in October.


1983 baseball history1983: The Good, the Old and the Ugly The Baltimore Orioles (good) fight off unlikely foes in the Philadelphia Phillies (old) and the White Sox (ugly).


2005 baseball history2005: At the End of the Primrose Path Eighty-eight years after their last championship, the White Sox ride on exceptional postseason pitching and a little luck from the umpire to conquer the Houston Astros in the World Series.


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The White Sox by the Decade


1900s Founded by Charles Comiskey—the right-hand man of American League czar Ban Johnson—the White Sox won the junior circuit’s very first pennant in 1901 and maintained a high level of success through their first decade, shining on staunch, workhorse pitching (led by the tireless Ed Walsh) that bailed out an almost non-existent offense referred to as the “Hitless Wonders.” The epitomizing moment of the times came in 1906 when the White Sox—having hit .230 with seven home runs all year—stunned the powerhouse, crosstown Cubs in the World Series.


1910s The White Sox slipped to the middle of the standings until a mid-decade infusion of genuine, long-overdue hitting talent led by Eddie Collins and the peerless “Shoeless” Joe Jackson brought the club back to prominence. Further backed by solid supporting stars Buck Weaver, Chick Gandil and veteran shineball ace Eddie Cicotte, Chicago won one World Series in 1917 and looked primed to win another in 1919—but a cabal of White Sox players infuriated with Comiskey’s penny-pinching, often heartless rule ganged together and infamously threw the series against Cincinnati.


1920s The Black Sox Scandal was belatedly exposed a year after the fact, with not only eight White Sox players (including Jackson and Cicotte) expelled from baseball, but also the winning vibes of the franchise’s first two decades as the Sox reeled into second-division obscurity for the long haul. An aging Collins gracefully continued to produce and the top-line pitching of Red Faber and Ted Lyons kept the Sox from falling into the AL abyss, but the scandal would cast a long shadow over Comiskey Park for years to come.


1930s The early decade spelled rough times for the White Sox, who saw the passing of Comiskey, fell to the AL basement and struggled to attract fans during the Great Depression while the local rival Cubs gave Chicago a far better brand of baseball to enjoy. A more positive momentum took hold when rough-and-tumble Jimmy Dykes took over as player-manager in 1934 and forged a roster deep on sage (if not outright talent) back to respectability, with help from Hall-of-Fame shortstop Luke Appling.


1940s Old pros Appling and Lyons continued to be the main attractions at Comiskey as the White Sox survived the war years with a string of unimpressive results that never brought them close to contention. After Dykes received a pink slip in 1946, things only got worse, as a dried-up farm system came home to roost with a series of dismal performances to finish out the decade.


1950s A rejuvenated front office molded an exciting roster built on speed behind Minnie Minoso and later Luis Aparacio, resulting in 1951 with the first of 12 straight years in which the White Sox would lead the AL in steals—and the first of 17 straight winning records for the franchise. Sharp pitching led by the unyielding Billy Pierce proved pivotal during the decade as well, though the nonstop dominance of the New York Yankees kept Chicago from taking any AL flags—until 1959, when the White Sox finally sneaked past and won their first pennant in 40 years before bowing to the Los Angeles Dodgers at the World Series.


1960s The winning continued, but postseason activity remained fleeting as competition among AL teams intensified. Displaying deadball era redux, the White Sox’ bats weakened in spite of their overall accomplishments, notably channeling the “Hitless Wonders” days of lore when they finished third in an ultra-tight 1967 AL pennant race despite hitting only .225 as a team. Great pitching continued to flourish, with star turns by Gary Peters, Eddie Fisher, Joe Horlen and a young Tommy John.


1970s A somewhat volatile and mostly unsuccessful (on the field) decade began with the team nearly being moved to Milwaukee; later, under once-and-current maverick owner Bill Veeck, the White Sox installed an outdoor shower to cool off Comiskey Park fans, had players wear shorts on the field and held the notorious Disco Demolition Night in 1979—which ended in a riot. On the field, the White Sox were occasionally worth watching thanks to the outrageous workhorse numbers of knuckleball pitcher Wilbur Wood and (briefly) turbulent star slugger Dick Allen.


1980s Under new leadership from owner Jerry Reinsdorf and manager Tony La Russa, the White Sox rose to prominence early in the decade, peaking in 1983 with their 99-63 “winning ugly” campaign, but La Russa’s 1986 departure to Oakland set the team back in the standings for an extended period. Chicago became home for Hall of Famers at the end of the line (Carlton Fisk, Tom Seaver) who still had something left to show; steady slugger Harold Baines also brought a dependable presence to the lineup.


1990s The White Sox nearly moved again (this time to Florida) before building a new Comiskey Park next to the old one. They also garnered some serious star talent, most prominently with lumbering star bopper Frank Thomas—who in a seven-year stretch annually collected at least 20 home runs, 100 RBIs, 100 runs, 100 walks and a .300 batting average—leading to some early-decade success amid otherwise average results in the standings. Reinsdorf made few friends among owners (for his hypocritical maneuvers related to the 1994-95 strike) and fans, especially in 1997 when he prematurely packed it in by trading veteran talent with two months to play—all while the team was just three games out of first place.


2000s The postseason was almost always in play for the White Sox, usually staying alive for continuance in October up to the final week or two of the season. Under the feisty managerial rule of former Chicago shortstop Ozzie Guillen, it all came together in 2005 as the White Sox finally won their first World Series in 88 years with a sweep of Houston. Historically deprived of punch at the plate, the Sox finally became consistently alive with the long ball thanks to a succession of boomers (Magglio Ordonez, Carlos Lee, Paul Konerko)—not to mention reduced field dimensions at U.S. Cellular Field.


2010s The White Sox have slipped back into a rut of mediocrity, a reputation only aggravated by the championship rise of the Cubs on the North Side. The team’s tradition of hiring former White Sox players to manage continued with ex-third sacker Robin Ventura taking the reins in 2012, but he could not bust through to the top of the AL Central despite the presence of Cuban-born slugger Jose Abreu and A-list pitcher Chris Sale.


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