Boston Red Sox

Known as the Boston Americans, 1901-07


Ballparks of the Red Sox
Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds (1901-11); Fenway Park (1912-present); Braves Field (1916, 1929-32, partial usage).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates team record. * - World Series champion. # - American League champion. e - Eastern Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1901 79 57 .581 4 2 .278 759 37 157 3.04 Buck Freeman Cy Young 289.448
1902 77 60 .562 6.5 3 .278 664 42 132 3.02 Buck Freeman Cy Young 348.567
1903 91 47 .659 --- #*1 .272 708 48 141 2.57 Buck Freeman Cy Young 379,338
1904 95 59 .617 --- #1 .247 608 26 101 2.12 Chick Stahl Cy Young 623,295
1905 78 74 .513 16 4 .234 579 29 131 2.84 Jimmy Collins Cy Young 468,828
1906 49 105 .318 45.5 8 .237 463 13 99 3.41 Chick Stahl Cy Young 410,209
1907 59 90 .396 32.5 7 .234 466 18 125 2.45 Bob Unglaub Cy Young 436,777
1908 75 79 .487 15.5 5 .245 564 14 156 2.28 Doc Gessler Cy Young 473,048
1909 88 63 .583 9.5 3 .263 601 20 215 2.59 Tris Speaker Frank Arellanes 668,965
1910 81 72 .529 22.5 4 .259 641 43 194 2.45 Tris Speaker Ray Collins 584,619
1911 78 75 .510 24 5 .275 680 35 190 2.74 Tris Speaker Smoky Joe Wood 503,961
1912 105 47 .691 --- #*1 .277 799 29 185 2.76 Tris Speaker Smoky Joe Wood 597,096
1913 79 71 .527 15.5 4 .269 631 17 189 2.94 Tris Speaker Ray Collins 437,194
1914 91 62 .595 8.5 2 .250 589 18 177 2.36 Tris Speaker Dutch Leonard 481,359
1915 101 50 .669 --- #*1 .260 669 14 118 2.39 Tris Speaker Ernie Shore 539,885
1916 91 63 .591 --- #*1 .248 550 14 129 2.48 Harry Hooper Babe Ruth 496,397
1917 90 62 .592 9 2 .246 555 14 105 2.20 Harry Hooper Carl Mays 387,856
1918 75 51 .595 --- #*1 .249 474 15 110 2.31 Harry Hooper Carl Mays 249,513
1919 66 71 .482 20.5 6 .261 564 33 108 3.31 Babe Ruth Herb Pennock 417,291

“I think the Yankees are taking a gamble.”
—Red Sox owner Harry Frazee, after trading Babe Ruth in 1920


1920 72 81 .471 25.5 5 .261 650 22 98 3.82 Harry Hooper Herb Pennock 402,445
1921 75 79 .487 23.5 5 .277 668 17 83 3.98 Del Pratt Sad Sam Jones 279,273
1922 61 93 .396 33 8 .263 598 45 64 4.30 Del Pratt Jack Quinn 259,184
1923 61 91 .407 37 8 .261 584 34 79 4.20 Joe Harris Howard Ehmke 229,688
1924 67 87 .435 25 7 .277 735 30 78 4.35 Ike Boone Jack Quinn 448,556
1925 47 105 .309 49.5 8 .266 639 41 42 4.97 Ike Boone Ted Wingfield 267,782
1926 46 107 .301 44.5 8 .256 562 32 52 4.72 Topper Rigney Hal Wiltse 285,155
1927 51 103 .331 59 8 .259 597 28 81 4.72 Ira Flagstead Slim Harriss 305,275
1928 57 96 .373 43.5 8 .264 589 38 97 4.39 Buddy Myer Ed Morris 396,920
1929 58 96 .377 48 8 .267 605 28 86 4.43 Jack Rothrock Danny MacFayden 394,620
1930 52 102 .338 50 8 .264 612 47 42 4.68 Earl Webb Milt Gaston 444,045
1931 62 90 .408 45 6 .262 625 37 42 4.60 Earl Webb Wilcy Moore 350,975
1932 43 111 .279 64 8 .251 566 53 46 5.02 Smead Jolley Ivy Andrews 182,150
1933 63 86 .423 34.5 7 .271 700 50 58 4.35 Roy Johnson Gordon Rhodes 268,715
1934 76 76 .500 24 4 .274 820 51 116 4.32 Bill Werber Wes Ferrell 610,640
1935 78 75 .510 16 4 .276 718 69 91 4.05 Joe Cronin Lefty Grove 558,568
1936 74 80 .481 28.5 7 .276 775 86 55 4.39 Jimmie Foxx Lefty Grove 626,895
1937 80 72 .526 21 5 .281 821 100 79 4.48 Jimmie Foxx Lefty Grove 559,659
1938 88 61 .591 9.5 2 .299 902 98 55 4.46 Jimmie Foxx Lefty Grove 646,459
1939 89 62 .589 17 2 .291 890 124 42 4.56 Ted Williams Lefty Grove 573,070
1940 82 72 .532 8 T-4 .286 872 145 55 4.89 Ted Williams Joe Heving 716,234
1941 84 70 .545 17 2 .283 865 124 67 4.19 Ted Williams Dick Newsome 718,497
1942 93 59 .612 9 2 .276 761 103 68 3.44 Ted Williams Tex Hughson 730,340

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the Boston Red Sox?
Roger Clemens > Aggressive ace won three Cy Young Awards and 192 games in memorable Boston tenure
Ted Williams > Strident and brilliant, arguably baseball’s best pure hitter ever; .344 average in career that spanned from 1939-60
Carl Yastzremski > Williams’ replacement in left field, spearheaded Red Sox revival in late 1960s and 1970s; 3,419 career hits, all with Boston
Tom Yawkey > Long-time owner rescued Red Sox from derelict Harry Frazee era and oversaw four decades of success and vibrance at Fenway Park


1943 68 84 .447 29 7 .244 563 57 86 3.45 Bobby Doerr Tex Hughson 358,275
1944 77 77 .500 12 4 .270 739 69 60 3.82 Bob Johnson Tex Hughson 506,975
1945 71 83 .461 17.5 7 .260 599 50 72 3.80 Eddie Lake Boo Ferriss 603,794
1946 104 50 .675 --- #1 .271 792 109 45 3.38 Ted Williams Tex Hughson 1,416,944
1947 83 71 .539 14 3 .265 720 103 41 3.81 Ted Williams Joe Dobson 1,427,315
1948 96 59 .619 1 2 .274 907 121 38 4.26 Ted Williams Mel Parnell 1,558,798
1949 96 58 .623 1 2 .282 896 131 43 3.97 Ted Williams Mel Parnell 1,596,650
1950 94 60 .610 4 3 .302 1,027 161 32 4.88 Walt Dropo Mel Parnell 1,344,080
1951 87 67 .565 11 3 .266 804 127 20 4.14 Ted Williams Mel Parnell 1,312,282
1952 76 78 .494 19 6 .255 668 113 59 3.80 Billy Goodman Mel Parnell 1,115.750
1953 84 69 .549 16 4 .264 656 101 33 3.58 George Kell Mickey McDermott 1,026,133
1954 69 85 .448 42 4 .266 700 123 51 4.01 Ted Williams Frank Sullivan 931,127
1955 84 70 .545 12 4 .264 755 137 43 3.72 Jackie Jensen Frank Sullivan 1,203,200
1956 84 70 .545 13 4 .275 780 139 28 4.17 Ted Williams Tom Brewer 1,137,158
1957 82 72 .532 16 3 .262 721 153 29 3.88 Ted Williams Frank Sullivan 1,181,087
1958 79 75 .513 13 3 .256 697 155 29 3.92 Jackie Jensen Frank Sullivan 1,077,047
1959 75 79 .487 19 5 .256 726 125 68 4.17 Jackie Jensen Tom Brewer 984,102
1960 65 89 .422 32 7 .261 658 124 34 4.62 Vic Wertz Mike Fornieles 1,129,866

Bushers Book
1961 76 86 .469 33 6 .254 729 112 56 4.29 Gary Geiger Don Schwall 850,589
1962 76 84 .475 19 8 .258 707 146 39 4.22 Carl Yastrzemski Dick Radatz 733,080
1963 76 85 .472 28 7 .252 666 171 27 3.97 Carl Yastrzemski Dick Radatz 942,642
1964 72 90 .444 27 8 .258 688 186 18 4.50 Dick Stuart Dick Radatz 883,276
1965 62 100 .383 40 9 .251 669 165 47 4.24 Carl Yastrzemski Earl Wlson 652,201
1966 72 90 .444 27 8 .258 655 186 35 4.50 Tony Conigliaro Jose Santiago 811,172
1967 92 70 .568 --- #1 .255 722 158 68 3.36 Carl Yastrzemski Jim Lonborg 1,727,832
1968 86 76 .531 17 4 .236 614 135 76 3.33 Carl Yastrzemski Ray Culp 1,940,788
1969 87 75 .537 22 3 .251 743 197 41 3.92 Rico Petrocelli Ray Culp 1,833,246
1970 87 75 .537 21 3 .262 786 203 50 3.87 Carl Yastrzemski Ray Culp 1,595,278
1971 85 77 .525 18 3 .252 691 161 51 3.80 Reggie Smith Sonny Siebert 1,678,732
1972 85 70 .548 0.5 2 .248 640 124 66 3.47 Carlton Fisk Luis Tiant 1,441,718
1973 89 73 .549 8 2 .267 738 147 114 3.65 Carl Yastrzemski Bill Lee 1,481,002
1974 84 78 .519 7 3 .264 696 109 104 3.72 Carl Yastrzemski Luis Tiant 1,556,411
1975 95 65 .594 --- #e 1 .275 796 134 66 3.98 Fred Lynn Bill Lee 1,748,587
1976 83 79 .512 15.5 3 .263 716 134 95 3.52 Fred Lynn Luis Tiant 1,895,846
1977 97 64 .605 2.5 T-2 .281 859 213 66 4.11 Jim Rice Bill Campbell 2,074,549
1978 99 64 .607 1 2 .267 796 172 74 3.54 Jim Rice Dennis Eckersley 2,320,643
1979 91 69 .569 11.5 3 .283 841 194 60 4.03 Fred Lynn Dennis Eckersley 2,353,114

“When I saw the left-field fence, I thought we were going to play softball.”
—Pitcher Joaquin Andujar, on his first visit to Fenway Park


1980 83 77 .519 19 4 .283 757 162 79 4.38 Jim Rice Bob Stanley 1,956,092
1981 59 49 .546 2/5 5/T-2 .275 519 90 32 3.81 Dwight Evans Mike Torrez 1,060,379
1982 89 73 .549 6 3 .274 753 136 42 4.03 Dwight Evans Bob Stanley 1,950,124
1983 78 84 .481 20 6 .270 724 142 30 4.34 Wade Boggs Bob Stanley 1,782,285
1984 86 76 .531 18 4 .283 810 181 38 4.18 Dwight Evans Al Nipper 1,661,618
1985 81 81 .500 18.5 5 .282 800 162 66 4.06 Wade Boggs Oil Can Boyd 1,786,633
1986 95 66 .590 --- #e 1 .271 794 144 41 3.93 Wade Boggs Roger Clemens 2,147,641
1987 78 84 .481 20 5 .278 842 174 77 4.77 Wade Boggs Roger Clemens 2,231,551
1988 89 73 .549 --- e 1 .283 813 124 65 3.97 Mike Greenwell Roger Clemens 2,464,851
1989 83 79 .512 6 3 .277 774 108 56 4.01 Wade Boggs Roger Clemens 2,510,012
1990 88 74 .543 --- e 1 .272 699 106 53 3.72 Wade Boggs Roger Clemens 2,528,986
1991 84 78 .519 7 T-2 .269 731 126 59 4.01 Wade Boggs Roger Clemens 2,562,435
1992 73 89 .451 23 7 .246 599 84 44 3.58 Tom Brunansky Roger Clemens 2,468,574
1993 80 82 .494 15 5 .264 686 114 73 3.77 Mo Vaughn Frank Viola 2,422,021
1994 54 61 .470 17 4 .263 552 120 81 4.93 Mo Vaughn Roger Clemens 1,775,818
1995 86 58 .597 --- e 1 .280 791 175 99 4.39 Mo Vaughn Tim Wakefield 2,164,410
1996 85 77 .525 7 3 .283 928 209 91 5.00 Mo Vaughn Roger Clemens 2,315,231
1997 78 84 .481 20 4 .291 851 185 68 4.87 Nomar Garciaparra Tom Gordon 2,226,136
1998 92 70 .568 22 ! 2 .280 876 205 72 4.19 Mo Vaughn Pedro Martinez 2,314,704
1999 94 68 .580 4 ! 2 .278 836 176 67 4.00 Nomar Garciaparra Pedro Martinez 2,446,162
2000 85 77 .525 2.5 2 .267 792 167 43 4.23 Nomar Garciaparra Pedro Martinez 2,585,895
2001 82 79 .509 13.5 2 .266 772 198 46 4.15 Manny Ramirez Tim Wakefield 2,625,333
2002 93 69 .574 10.5 2 .277 859 177 80 3.75 Manny Ramirez Derek Lowe 2,650,862
2003 95 67 .586 6 ! 2 .289 961 238 88 4.48 Manny Ramirez Pedro Martinez 2,724,165
2004 98 64 .605 3 !#* 2 .282 949 222 68 4.18 Manny Ramirez Curt Schilling 2,837,294
2005 95 67 .586 6 ! T-1 .281 910 199 45 4.74 David Ortiz Tim Wakefield 2,847,888
2006 86 76 .531 11 3 .269 820 192 51 4.83 David Ortiz Jonathon Papelbon 2,930,588
2007 96 66 .593 --- #*e 1 .279 867 166 96 3.87 David Ortiz Josh Beckett 2,970,755
2008 95 67 .586 2 ! 2 .280 845 173 120 4.01 Kevin Youkilis Jon Lester 3,048,250
2009 95 67 .586 8 ! 2 .270 872 212 126 4.35 Jason Bay Jon Lester 3,062,699
2010 89 73 .549 7 3 .268 818 211 68 4.20 Adrian Beltre Clay Buchholz 3,046,445
2011 90 72 .556 7 2 .280 875 203 102 4.20 Jacoby Ellsbury Jonathon Papelbon 3,054,001
2012 69 93 .426 26 5 .260 734 165 97 4.70 Dustin Pedroia Clay Buchholz 3,043,003
2013 97 65 .599 --- #*e 1 .277 853 178 123 3.79 David Ortiz Koji Uehara 2,833,333
2014 71 91 .438 25 5 .244 634 123 63 4.01 David Ortiz Jon Lester 2,956,089
2015 78 84 .481 15 5 .265 748 161 71 4.31 David Ortiz Wade Miley 2,880,694

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the Red Sox' History on This Great Game:

1903 baseball history1903: The First World Series With peace at hand, the American and National Leagues join hands in October and stage the first Fall Classic.


1912 baseball history1912: The $30,000 Muffs A series of critical blunders do in the New York Giants against the Boston Red Sox at the World Series.


1918 baseball history1918: All Work or Fight and No Play Baseball scratches and claws to stay intact as World War I reaches its brutal apex.


1923 baseball history1923: With Regards to Harry The New York Yankees become one of baseball's great dynasties at the willful expense of the Boston Red Sox and their Broadway-obsessed owner, Harry Frazee.


1941 baseball history1941: 56, .406 and Dem Bums Joe DiMaggio's magical hitting streak, Ted Williams' run at .400 and the rise of the Dodgers result in one of baseball's most memorable years.


1967 baseball history1967: The Impossible Dream The Boston Red Sox get serious after a decade of living a mediocre, country club-like existence.


1975 baseball history1975: Birth of a Renaissance America's passion for baseball is re-awakened with, arguably, the greatest World Series ever between Boston and Cincinnati.


1978 baseball history1978: The Denting of the Red Sox Bucky Dent's improbable 163rd-game heroics cap a feverish late-season comeback by the New York Yankees over the Boston Red Sox.


1986 baseball history1986: An October for the Ages A historic postseason full of comebacks and collapses takes on legendary proportions thanks to Bill Buckner.


2003 baseball history2003: Curses, Inc. Baseball's two most famously cursed—the Chicago Cubs and Boston Red Sox—add to their long-suffering legend of heartbreak.


2004 baseball history2004: Four Score and Six Years Hence Down 3-0 in the ALCS, the Boston Red Sox burst to life and spectacularly exorcise the Curse of the Bambino.


2013 baseball history2013: Coming on Strong After two years of internal misery, the Boston Red Sox come together and give an emotional lift to a wounded city with an inspirational championship effort.


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The Red Sox by the Decade


1900s One of the success stories during the American League’s infancy, the Red Sox (originally called the Americans) won two pennants early in the decade and claimed victory in the first World Series, stunning the powerhouse Pittsburgh Pirates in 1903. Boston was primarily led by the incomparable Cy Young, the portly ace scoffed at by the rival National League at the turn of the century as being too old and fat—all before claiming a solid stake as baseball’s best pitcher of the decade. After a brief freefall from grace, the Red Sox rebounded by decade’s end with a new batch of talent led by shrewd center fielder Tris Speaker.


1910s The Red Sox made their mark as the majors’ pre-eminent team of the decade, winning four world titles behind the emerging brilliance of Speaker and a plethora of pitching stars that began with 34-game winner Smoky Joe Wood and continued with the arrival of the tenacious Dutch Leonard, fractious Carl Mays and a very young Babe Ruth—who ultimately transcended his top-notch abilities on the mound to the plate. More sentimentally, 1912 saw the opening of Fenway Park—which, a century later, still remains as the Red Sox’ home.


1920s The decade was over for the Red Sox before it began when owner Harry Frazee—who held a far bigger passion for Broadway over baseball—sold rising superstar Ruth to the New York Yankees, initiating a virtual one-way pipeline of other worthy Boston talent that created a superpower in Gotham, relegated the Sox to an era of depressive baseball and, according to successive generations of Boston fans, established The Curse—a so-called hex from Ruth that would not be broken until the 21st Century. Not only did the Red Sox fail to produce a winning campaign during the 1920s, they were also the only team in the majors not to turn a profit.


1930s The post-Ruth malaise continued and bottomed out in 1932 with a franchise-worst 43-111 mark before the Red Sox were rescued by new owner Tom Yawkey—who overhauled Fenway Park (adding the iconic Green Monster in left field) and brought genuine talent back to Boston with the additions of star pitcher Lefty Grove, burly slugger Jimmie Foxx and, at decade’s end, the debut of the tall, lanky and peerless Ted Williams. Although Yawkey’s maneuvers failed to yield a pennant—yet—they were at least providing Fenway with long-lost excitement.


1940s The Red Sox continued to just barely lose out in their search for an AL flag, but in the meantime there was magic aplenty with the maturation of Williams, who became the last .400 hitter to date in 1941 and won four batting titles throughout the decade. His absence during World War II hindered the Sox’ performance, but his return in 1946 generated, finally, the team’s first pennant in nearly three decades before losing a tough seven-game World Series to St. Louis. More frustration came afterward when Boston fell shy of first place by a single game in successive seasons (1948-49).


1950s The highly potent Red Sox offense peaked in 1950 when it scored over 1,000 runs and became the last team to hit over .300. But during the virtually petrified AL of the 1950s, Boston cemented itself as a middle-of-the-pack ballclub that could not chip away at Yankee dominance; an aging Williams, chronically absent due to military duty, injury and/or brief retirement, could by now only do so much to assist a franchise that was struggling to successfully reload beyond fellow MVP contender Jackie Jensen.


1960s After Williams stepped down for good in 1960, the Red Sox entered a stale existence for a good chunk of the decade in front of an increasingly empty Fenway Park, reaching a nadir in 1965 with 100 losses. The cobwebs were suddenly swept aside in 1967 when vibrant young manager Dick Williams re-awoke the Red Sox to a startling AL pennant behind the heroics of triple-crown star Carl Yastrzemski. The Sox fell short again at the World Series (once more in seven games to the Cardinals), but long-term vitality had returned to Boston.


1970s The Red Sox spent much of the 1970s playing second fiddle in the AL East, often in heartbreaking fashion; they finished a mere half-game behind Detroit in 1972 and blew a 14-game lead to the Yankees in 1978, losing a one-game playoff to determine the divisional champ—reviving claims that The Curse was alive and well. Boston did break through to one pennant in 1975 with sensational rookie efforts from Fred Lynn and Jim Rice—but yet again lost a memorable seven-game Fall Classic, this time to Cincinnati in what many hail as the greatest World Series ever.


1980s The winning ways continued in Boston—but apparently so did The Curse. Hall of Famers emerged with five-time batting champ Wade Boggs and fiery ace Roger Clemens, who won his first two of an eventual record seven Cy Young Awards. The Red Sox claimed two divisional titles and reached the World Series in 1986 when, with one out away from a long-sought championship, the dream was shattered with a major breakdown famously highlighted by Billy Buckner’s through-the-legs error at first base—further perpetuating the aura of The Curse.


1990s After another AL East title in 1990, the Red Sox fell into disrepair for the next four years as an unusually anemic offense weighed the team down in the standings. But a post-strike jolt of hitting led by booming Mo Vaughn and shortstop Nomar Garciaparra rejuvenated Boston and aided a pitching staff which, after losing Clemens via trade, re-armed itself towards decade’s end with the addition of Pedro Martinez—the only pitcher putting up deadball-like numbers during the height of the steroid era.


2000s The advent of the wild card became the Red Sox’ salvation, ultimately (and finally) foiling The Curse in historic, mind-blowing fashion. Bulked up with star sluggers Manny Ramirez and David Ortiz, Boston did all it could to break the Yankees’ Goliath-like hold on the AL East but frequently finished second—yet was able to snare the wild card spot five times. Facing the Yankees in the 2004 ALCS, the Red Sox were an inning away from being swept when they launched baseball’s most incredible postseason comeback, overcoming the Yankees and (fittingly) defeating St. Louis for their first world title in 86 years; they won a second World Series three years later against Colorado. Red Sox fans ate it up, selling out every game at Fenway Park from 2003 into the next decade.


2010s Rocky times hit as a series of turbulent internal episodes temporarily grounded the Red Sox’ high-flying momentum of the new century. Refocused with spirit in 2013 with new manager John Farrell, a galvanized roster made it three world titles in a decade’s time, upending the Cardinals in six games.