Baltimore Orioles

Known as the Milwaukee Brewers, 1901; St. Louis Browns, 1902-53


Ballparks of the Orioles
Lloyd Street Grounds (1901); Sportsman’s Park (1902-53); Memorial Stadium (1954-91); Oriole Park at Camden Yards (1992-present).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates team record. * - World Series champion. # - American League champion. e - Eastern Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1901 48 89 .350 35.5 8 .261 641 26 176 4.06 John Anderson Bill Reidy 139,034
1902 78 58 .574 5 2 .265 619 29 137 3.34 Jesse Burkett Red Donahue 272,283
1903 65 74 .468 26.5 6 .244 500 12 101 2.77 John Anderson Willie Sudhoff 380,405
1904 65 87 .428 29 6 .239 481 10 150 2.83 Bobby Wallace Harry Howell 318,108
1905 54 99 .353 40.5 8 .232 512 16 144 2.74 George Stone Harry Howell 339,112
1906 76 73 .510 16 5 .247 560 20 221 2.23 George Stone Barney Pelty 389,157
1907 69 83 .454 24 6 .253 541 10 144 2.61 George Stone Harry Howell 319,025
1908 83 69 .546 6.5 4 .245 544 20 126 2.15 George Stone Harry Howell 618,947
1909 61 89 .407 36 7 .232 441 10 136 2.88 Roy Hartzell Jack Powell 366,274
1910 47 107 .305 57 8 .218 451 12 169 3.09 George Stone Joe Lake 249,889
1911 45 107 .296 56.5 8 .239 567 17 125 3.86 Frank LaPorte Joe Lake 207,984
1912 53 101 .344 53 7 .248 552 19 176 3.71 Del Pratt Earl Hamilton 214,070
1913 57 96 .373 39 8 .237 528 18 209 3.06 Burt Shotton Earl Hamilton 250,330
1914 71 82 .464 28.5 5 .243 523 17 233 2.85 Tillie Walker Carl Weilman 244,714
1915 63 91 .409 39.5 6 .246 522 19 202 3.06 Burt Shotton Carl Weilman 150,358
1916 79 75 .513 12 5 .245 588 14 234 2.58 Burt Shotton Carl Weilman 335,740
1917 57 97 .370 43 7 .246 510 15 157 3.20 George Sisler Allen Sothoron 210,486
1918 58 64 .475 15 5 .259 426 5 139 2.75 George Sisler Allen Sothoron 122,076
1919 67 72 .482 20.5 5 .264 533 31 74 3.13 George Sisler Carl Weilman 349,350

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the Baltimore Orioles?
Jim Palmer > Eloquent symbol of the Orioles’ pitching mastery of the 1960s and 1970s with eight 20-win campaigns and three Cy Young Awards
Cal Ripken Jr. > Team icon, two-time MVP and durable shortstop who remarkably played in 2,632 straight games
Brooks Robinson > Incomparable third baseman who won 15 consecutive Gold Gloves and led Orioles to their first two world titles
Earl Weaver > Pugnacious manager who developed “The Oriole Way” in the minors before managing O’s to 15 straight winning seasons


1920 76 77 .497 21.5 4 .308 797 50 121 4.03 George Sisler Urban Shocker 419,311
1921 81 73 .526 17.5 3 .304 835 67 91 4.61 George Sisler Urban Shocker 355,978
1922 93 61 .604 1 2 .313 867 98 136 3.38 Ken Williams Urban Shocker 712,918
1923 74 78 .487 24 5 .281 688 82 64 3.93 Ken Williams Urban Shocker 430,296
1924 74 78 .487 17 4 .295 769 67 85 4.57 Ken Williams Ernie Wingard 533,349
1925 82 71 .536 15 3 .298 900 110 85 4.92 George Sisler Milt Gaston 462,898
1926 62 92 .403 29 7 .276 682 72 64 4.66 Harry Rice Tom Zachary 283,986
1927 59 94 .386 50.5 7 .276 724 55 90 4.95 Ken Williams Lefty Stewart 247,879
1928 82 72 .532 19 3 .274 772 63 78 4.17 Heinie Manush Sam Gray 339,497
1929 79 73 .520 26 4 .276 733 46 70 4.08 Heinie Manush Sam Gray 280,697
1930 64 90 .416 38 6 .268 751 75 93 5.07 Red Kress Lefty Stewart 152,088

Bushers Book
1931 63 91 .409 45 5 .271 721 76 73 4.76 Goose Goslin Dick Coffman 179,126
1932 63 91 .409 44 6 .276 736 67 69 5.01 Goose Goslin Lefty Stewart 112,558
1933 55 96 .364 43.5 8 .253 669 64 72 4.82 Bruce Campbell Bump Hadley 88,113
1934 67 85 .441 33 6 .268 674 62 43 4.49 Sammy West Bobo Newsom 115,305
1935 65 87 .428 28.5 7 .270 718 73 45 5.26 Moose Solters Ivy Andrews 80,922
1936 57 95 .375 44.5 7 .279 804 79 62 6.24 Beau Bell Ivy Andrews 93,267
1937 46 108 .299 56 8 .285 715 71 30 6.00 Harlond Clift Oral Hildebrand 121,121
1938 55 97 .362 44 7 .281 755 92 51 5.80 Harlond Clift Bobo Newsom 130,417
1939 43 111 .279 64.5 8 .268 733 91 48 4.72 George McQuinn Bill Trotter 109,159
1940 67 87 .435 23 6 .263 757 118 51 5.12 Wally Judnich Eldon Auker 239,591
1941 70 84 .455 31 T-6 .266 765 91 50 4.72 Roy Cullenbine Bob Muncrief 176,240
1942 82 69 .543 19.5 3 .259 730 98 37 3.59 Chet Laabs Johnny Niggeling 255,617
1943 72 80 .474 25 6 .245 596 78 37 3.41 Vern Stephens Denny Galehouse 214,392
1944 89 65 .678 --- # 1 .263 684 60 44 3.17 Vern Stephens Jack Kramer 508,644
1945 81 70 .536 6 3 .249 597 63 25 3.14 Vern Stephens Nels Potter 482,986
1946 66 88 .429 38 7 .251 621 84 23 3.95 Vern Stephens Jack Kramer 526,435
1947 59 95 .383 38 8 .241 564 90 69 4.33 Jeff Heath Sam Zoldak 320,474
1948 59 94 .386 37 6 .271 671 63 63 5.01 Bob Dillinger Ned Garver 335,564
1949 53 101 .344 44 7 .271 667 117 38 5.21 Roy Sievers Ned Garver 270,936

“The Browns are unable to beat their way out of a paper bag with a crowbar.”
—Bill Veeck who owned the Browns in the early 1950s


1950 58 96 .377 40 7 .246 684 106 39 5.20 Don Lenhardt Ned Garver 247,131
1951 52 102 .338 46 8 .247 611 86 35 5.18 Jim Delsing Ned Garver 293,790
1952 64 90 .316 31 7 .250 604 82 30 4.12 Bob Nieman Satchel Paige 518,796
1953 54 100 .351 46.5 8 .249 555 112 17 4.48 Vic Wertz Marlin Stuart 297,238
1954 54 100 .351 57 7 .251 483 52 30 3.88 Cal Abrams Duane Pillette 1,060,910
1955 57 97 .370 39 7 .240 540 54 34 4.21 Gus Triandos Jim Wilson 852,039
1956 69 85 .448 28 6 .244 571 91 39 4.20 Gus Triandos Connie Johnson 901,201
1957 76 76 .500 21 5 .252 597 87 57 3.46 Bob Nieman Connie Johnson 1,029,581
1958 74 79 .484 17.5 6 .241 521 108 33 3.40 Gus Triandos Billy O'Dell 829,991
1959 74 80 .481 20 6 .238 551 109 36 3.56 Gene Woodling Hoyt Wilhelm 891,926
1960 89 65 .578 8 2 .253 682 123 37 3.52 Brooks Robinson Jack Fisher 1,187,849
1961 95 67 .586 14 3 .254 691 149 39 3.22 Jim Gentile Steve Barber 951,089
1962 77 85 .475 19 7 .248 652 156 45 3.69 Brooks Robinson Robin Roberts 790,254
1963 86 76 .531 18.5 4 .249 644 146 97 3.45 Boog Powell Steve Barber 774,343
1964 97 65 .599 2 3 .248 679 162 78 3.16 Brooks Robinson Wally Bunker 1,116,215
1965 94 68 .580 8 3 .238 641 125 67 2.98 Brooks Robinson Stu Miller 781,649
1966 97 63 .606 --- #*1 .258 755 175 55 3.32 Frank Robinson Jim Palmer 1,203,366
1967 76 85 .472 15.5 T-6 .240 654 138 54 3.32 Frank Robinson Tom Phoebus 955,053
1968 91 71 .562 12 2 .225 579 133 78 2.66 Frank Robinson Dave McNally 943,977
1969 109 53 .673 --- #e 1 .265 779 175 82 2.83 Frank Robinson Mike Cuellar 1,062,069
1970 108 54 .667 --- #*e 1 .257 792 179 84 3.15 Boog Powell Dave McNally 1,057,069
1971 101 57 .639 --- #e 1 .261 742 158 66 2.99 Don Buford Pat Dobson 1,023,037
1972 80 74 .519 5 3 .229 519 100 78 2.53 Boog Powell Jim Palmer 899,950
1973 97 65 .599 --- e 1 .266 754 119 146 3.07 Bobby Grich Jim Palmer 958,667
1974 91 71 .562 --- e 1 .256 659 116 145 3.27 Bobby Grich Mike Cuellar 962,572
1975 90 69 .566 4.5 2 .252 682 124 104 3.17 Ken Singleton Jim Palmer 1,002,157
1976 88 74 .543 10.5 2 .243 619 119 150 3.32 Reggie Jackson Jim Palmer 1,058,609
1977 97 64 .602 2.5 T-2 .261 719 148 90 3.74 Ken Singleton Jim Palmer 1,195,769
1978 90 71 .559 9 4 .258 659 154 75 3.56 Eddie Murray Jim Palmer 1,051,724
1979 102 57 .642 --- #e 1 .261 757 181 99 3.26 Ken Singleton Mike Flanagan 1,681,009
1980 100 62 .617 3 2 .273 805 156 111 3.64 Eddie Murray Scott McGregor 1,797,438
1981 59 46 .562 1 2/4 .251 429 88 41 3.70 Eddie Murray Sammy Stewart 1,024,247
1982 94 68 .580 1 2 2.66 774 179 49 3.99 Eddie Murray Jim Palmer 1,613,031
1983 98 64 .605 --- #*e 1 .269 799 168 61 3.63 Eddie Murray Mike Boddicker 2,042,071
1984 85 77 .525 19 5 .252 681 160 51 3.71 Eddie Murray Mike Boddicker 2,045,784
1985 83 78 .516 16 4 .263 818 214 69 4.38 Eddie Murray Don Aase 2,132,387
1986 73 89 .451 22.5 7 .258 708 169 64 4.30 Cal Ripken Jr. Don Aase 1,973,176
1987 67 95 .414 31 6 .258 729 211 69 5.01 Larry Sheets Mike Boddicker 1,835,692
1988 54 107 .335 34.5 7 .238 550 137 69 4.54 Cal Ripken Jr. Dave Schmidt 1,660,738

“Baseball was an exhibition sport at the Olympics—sort of like it was in Baltimore.”
—David Letterman, after the Orioles lost their first 21 games in 1988


1989 87 75 .537 2 2 .252 708 129 118 4.00 Phil Bradley Jeff Ballard 2,535,208
1990 76 85 .472 11.5 5 .245 669 132 94 4.04 Cal Ripken Jr. Gregg Olson 2,415,189
1991 67 95 .414 24 6 .254 686 170 50 4.59 Cal Ripken Jr. Bob Milacki 2,552,753
1992 89 73 .549 7 3 .259 705 148 89 3.79 Brady Anderson Mike Mussina 3,567,819
1993 85 77 .525 10 T-3 .267 786 157 73 4.31 Chris Hoiles Ben McDonald 3,644,965
1994 63 49 .562 6.5 2 .272 589 139 69 4.31 Rafael Palmeiro Mike Mussina 2,535,359
1995 71 73 .493 15 3 .262 704 173 92 4.31 Rafael Palmeiro Kevin Brown 3,098,475
1996 88 74 .543 4 ! 2 .274 949 257 76 5.15 Brady Anderson Mike Mussina 3,646,950
1997 98 64 .605 --- e 1 .268 812 196 63 3.91 Brady Anderson Randy Myers 3,711,132
1998 79 83 .488 35 4 .273 817 214 86 4.73 Rafael Palmeiro Mike Mussina 3,684,650
1999 78 84 .481 20 4 .279 851 203 107 4.77 Albert Belle Mike Mussina 3,433,150
2000 74 88 .457 13.5 4 .272 794 184 126 5.37 Delino DeShields Mike Mussina 3,297,031
2001 63 98 .391 32.5 4 .248 687 136 133 4.67 Jeff Conine Jason Johnson 3,094,841
2002 67 95 .414 36.5 4 .246 667 165 110 4.46 Tony Batista Rodrigo Lopez 2,682,439
2003 71 91 .438 30 4 .268 743 152 89 4.76 Jay Gibbons Sidney Ponson 2,454,523
2004 78 84 .481 23 3 .281 842 169 101 4.70 Miguel Tejada Rodrigo Lopez 2,744,018
2005 74 88 .457 21 4 .269 729 189 83 4.56 Brian Roberts B.J. Ryan 2,624,740
2006 70 92 .432 27 4 .277 768 164 121 5.35 Miguel Tejada Erik Bedard 2,153,139
2007 69 93 .426 27 4 .272 756 142 144 5.17 Nick Markakis Erik Bedard 2,164,822
2008 68 93 .422 28.5 5 .267 782 172 81 5.13 Aubrey Huff Jeremy Guthrie 1,950,075
2009 64 98 .395 39 5 .268 741 160 76 5.15 Brian Roberts Brad Bergesen 1,907,163
2010 66 96 .407 30 5 .259 613 133 76 4.59 Luke Scott Jeremy Guthrie 1,733,019
2011 69 93 .426 28 5 .257 708 191 81 4.89 Mark Reynolds Jeremy Guthrie 1,755,461
2012 93 69 .574 2 ! 2 .247 712 214 58 3.90 Adam Jones Jim Johnson 2,102,240
2013 85 77 .525 12 T-3 .260 745 212 79 4.20 Chris Davis Jim Johnson 2,357,561
2014 96 66 .593 --- e 1 .256 705 211 44 3.43 Nelson Cruz Zach Britton 2,464,473

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the Orioles' History on This Great Game:

1944 baseball history1944: Meet Us in St. Louis The powerhouse St. Louis Cardinals get a surprise World Series opponent in the neighboring Browns.


1966 baseball history1966: Wish You Were Here, Mr. DeWitt Frank Robinson dominates the American League for the Baltimore Orioles—and proves to his former employers in Cincinnati that he's not an Old Thirty.


1970 baseball history1970: One for the Brooks The incomparable Brooks Robinson cleans up at third base on the world's biggest baseball stage for the Baltimore Orioles.


1983 baseball history1983: The Good, the Old and the Ugly The Baltimore Orioles (good) fight off unlikely foes in the Philadelphia Phillies (old) and the Chicago White Sox (ugly).


1995 baseball history1995: Thanks to Cal, Hideo—and Sonia, Too Numerous feel-good moments rescue baseball from its most devastating work stoppage.


1996 baseball history1996: Here's Spittin' at You, Kid Roberto Alomar takes center stage in the worst way, only to have it stolen by a Jersey kid in a classic case of poetic justice.


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The Orioles by the Decade


1900s The Orioles actually began business in 1901 as the Milwaukee Brewers, lasting one year in Wisconsin before starting a 50-year stay in St. Louis as the famously inept Browns. The team didn’t instantly establish its rotten reputation in their first decade of play, finishing above .500 three times and, in 1901, finishing second in the AL race. Adding star players at the end of their careers (Rube Waddell, Cy Young, Jimmy Williams) late in the decade failed to ignite any long-term success. One lasting legacy was born in 1909 when the Browns built and opened Sportsman’s Park, which would later house the Cardinals for 47 years.


1910s The Browns badly crashed to start the decade, their sole contribution of historical note being their shameful role in the effort to decide the 1910 batting title between Ty Cobb and Nap Lajoie. Slowly the team recovered and even peaked briefly into winning territory in 1916 before slipping back into mediocrity, but not before bringing on George Sisler as the franchise’s first true star talent—only after the Pittsburgh Pirates had lost the rights to him.


1920s Fueled by Sisler and a fantastic hitting outfield of Ken Williams, Jack Tobin and Baby Doll Jacobson, the Browns were at their most formidable in the early 1920s—peaking in 1922 with a memorable pennant race in which the team lost out on an AL pennant to the New York Yankees by a single game. Inconsistent results followed as the offense remained respected but the pitching regressed, and the team never seriously contended for the rest of the decade.


1930s A double-whammy of the Great Depression and the rise of the Cardinals as a major league powerhouse put the Browns in the outhouse, both on the field and on the bottom line. Many nadirs were reached. The team drew an abysmal 80,922 fans for the entire 1935 season; a year later, its pitching staff registered an AL record-worst 6.24 ERA (since broken); and in 1939, the Browns completely fell apart with the franchise’s all-time worst record of 43-111. St. Louis averaged 95 losses a year through the decade and failed to deliver a single winning mark.


1940s Wartime baseball was a true blessing for the Browns, who took advantage of the game’s radical, ever-changing environment as veteran players went off to war. Replacements, remaining 4-F rejects and even handicapped ballplayers such as one-armed Pete Gray lifted the Browns in the standings, resulting in 1944 with the franchise’s first and only St. Louis pennant—only to lose the World Series to their superior city rival in the Cardinals. A return to normality following World War II meant a return to reality for the Browns, who finished the decade back near the AL basement.


1950s The Browns began the decade as their usual awful selves; not even master showman Bill Veeck, who briefly owned the franchise, could lift the team despite bringing in his usual bag of promotional tricks—including a midget who actually logged a plate appearance in a 1951 game. Hoping to move the team back to Milwaukee (see 1901), Veeck instead was bought out—and the new owners promptly moved the Browns to Baltimore. Bigger crowds welcomed the rebranded Orioles as the roster slowly matured and improved to mild respectability by decade’s end.


1960s The franchise at long last turned the corner towards greatness, first with exceptionally gifted (and young) pitching and later with the emergence of third base fielding magnet Brooks Robinson, muscular slugger Boog Powell—and the 1966 acquisition from Cincinnati of superstar Frank Robinson (scoffed at by the Reds as being an “old 30”), who won the hitter’s triple crown and led the Orioles to their first world championship. Baltimore won another AL flag in 1969 but was startled in the World Series by the surprising New York Mets.


1970s Dominance continued under the feisty leadership of skipper Earl Weaver, as Baltimore won two pennants to start the decade and a third to close it out; but the Orioles could manage only one World Series triumph (over the Reds in 1971), losing the other two to Pittsburgh after blowing two-game leads in both. Brilliant pitching, highlighted in 1971 with four 20-game winners, was firmly anchored by three-time Cy Young Award winner Jim Palmer—while effective working-class offense was chiefly supplied by Bobby Grich, Ken Singleton and, at decade’s end, future Hall-of-Famer Eddie Murray.


1980s Murray was joined by iron man shortstop Cal Ripken Jr., who in 1983 won the AL MVP and helped lead the Orioles to their last championship to date with a sound defeat of Philadelphia in the team’s first season after the retirement of Weaver. But the Oriole Way hit a massive pothole by mid-decade—finishing below .500 in 1986 for the first time in 19 years and, in 1988, limping out to a historically embarrassing 0-21 start—as the team’s typically staunch pitching went badly soft.


1990s Long-time Baltimore home Memorial Stadium was abandoned in favor of Oriole Park at Camden Yards, which sparked the retro ballpark movement and gave the Orioles a huge emotional—and financial—boost. Suddenly armed with copius sums of revenue, the Orioles engorged on offensive talent and became perennial contenders for much of the 1990s. But the iconic Oriole moment of the decade came in 1995 when Ripken surpassed Lou Gehrig’s immortal mark of 2,130 consecutive games played—stretching the new standard to 2,630 before finally taking a rest late in 1998.


2000s The Camden Yards effect vanished as much of baseball caught up to—and surpassed—the Orioles by building one new baseball-specific venue after another, chipping away at Baltimore’s once-enormous economic advantage. The failure for the Orioles to readjust led to a decade of pure defeat, the heart of a 14-year streak of losing seasons—a pitiful run that not even the sadsack Browns before them had endured—while attendance was halved from a decade earlier. The Orioles continued to hit the ball well, but adequate pitching was practically nowhere to be found.


2010s The losing continued to start, but that came to an abrupt halt in 2012 when the Orioles improved by 24 games and made their first playoff appearance since 1997—an especially impressive development given the high level of competition in a tough AL East. A revived bullpen has led to a long-overdue stabilization of the Baltimore staff that has translated to continued success in the standings, all under the veteran tutelage of manager Buck Showalter.


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