Atlanta Braves

Known as the Boston Red Stockings, 1871-75; Boston Red Caps, 1876-82; Boston Beaneaters, 1883-06; Boston Doves, 1907-10; Boston Rustlers, 1911; Boston Braves, 1912-35, 1941-52; Boston Bees, 1936-40; Milwaukee Braves, 1953-65


Ballparks of the Braves
South End Grounds (1871-1914); Braves Field (1915-52); Milwaukee County Stadium (1953-65); Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium (1966-96); Turner Field (1997-2016); SunTrust Park (opening in 2017).


Brown type indicates league leader. Italic type indicates modern era (1900 or later) team record. * - World Series champion. # - League champion. w - Western Division champion. e - Eastern Division champion. ! - Wild Card entrant.

Year
W
L
PCT
GB
Pos.
BA
R
HR
SB
ERA
Best Hitter
Best Pitcher
Attendance
1871 20 10 .667 2 2 .310 401 3 73 3.55 Cal McVey Al Spalding  
1872 39 8 .830 --- #1 .317 521 7 47 1.99 Ross Barnes Al Spalding  
1873 43 16 .729 --- #1 .338 739 13 39 2.59 Ross Barnes Al Spalding  
1874 52 18 .743 --- #1 .314 735 18   2.36 Cal McVey Al Spalding  
1875 71 8 .899 --- #1 .320 831 14   1.70 Ross Barnes Al Spalding  
1876 39 31 .557 15 4 .266 471 9   2.51 Jim O'Rourke Jack Manning  
1877 42 18 .700 --- #1 .296 419 4   2.15 Deacon White Tommy Bond  
1878 41 19 .683 --- #1 .241 298 2   2.32 Jim O'Rourke Tommy Bond  
1879 54 30 .643 5 2 .274 562 20   2.19 Charley Jones Tommy Bond  
1880 40 44 .476 27 6 .253 416 41   3.08 Jim O'Rourke Tommy Bond  
1881 38 45 .458 17.5 6 .251 349 5   2.71 John Morrill Jim Whitney  
1882 45 39 .536 10 T-3 .264 472 15   2.80 Jim Whitney Jim Whitney  
1883 63 35 .643 --- #1 .276 669 34   2.55 John Morrill Jim Whitney  
1884 73 38 .658 10.5 2 .254 684 60   2.47 Ezra Sutton Charlie Buffinton  
1885 46 66 .411 41 5 .232 528 22   3.03 Ezra Sutton Charlie Buffinton  
1886 56 61 .479 30.5 5 .260 657 24 156 3.24 Sam Wise Old Hoss Radbourn  
1887 61 60 .504 16.5 5 .277 831 53 373 4.41 Sam Wise Kid Madden  
1888 70 64 .522 15.5 4 .245 669 56 293 2.61 Dick Johnston John Clarkson  
1889 83 45 .648 1 2 .270 826 42 331 3.36 Dan Brouthers John Clarkson  
1890 76 57 .571 12 5 .258 763 31 285 2.93 Tommy Tucker Kid Nichols 147,539
1891 87 51 .630 --- #1 .255 847 54 289 2.76 Harry Stovey Kid Nichols 184,472
1892 102 48 .680 --- #1 .250 862 34 338 2.86 Hugh Duffy Kid Nichols 146.421
1893 86 43 .667 --- #1 .290 1,008 65 243 4.43 Tommy McCarthy Kid Nichols 193,300
1894 83 49 .629 8 3 .331 1,220 94 241 5.41 Hugh Duffy Kid Nichols 152,800
1895 71 60 .542 16.5 T-5 .290 907 54 199 4.27 Hugh Duffy Kid Nichols 242,000
1896 74 57 .565 17 4 .300 860 36 241 3.78 Billy Hamilton Kid Nichols 240,000
1897 93 39 .705 --- #1 .319 1,025 45 233 3.65 Hugh Duffy Kid Nichols 334,800
1898 102 47 .685 --- #1 .290 872 53 172 2.98 Jimmy Collins Kid Nichols 229,275
1899 95 57 .625 8 2 .287 858 39 185 3.26 Chick Stahl Vic Willis 200,384

Who's on the Mount Rushmore of the Atlanta Braves?
Hank Aaron > Hall-of-Fame icon who long held the career home run record, adored by Braves fans in both Milwaukee and Atlanta
Bobby Cox > Crusty but gifted manager who guided Braves to record 14 straight postseason appearances
Lou Perini > Opportunistic owner ignited baseball’s westward march by moving Braves to Milwaukee, where major success followed
Warren Spahn > Ageless left-handed ace who won post-deadball era-record 363 games, all but a handful with Braves


1900 66 72 .478 17 4 .283 778 48 182 3.72 Billy Hamilton Bill Dinneen 202,000
1901 69 69 .500 20.5 5 .249 531 28 158 2.90 George DeMontreville Vic Willis 146,502
1902 73 64 .533 29 3 .249 572 14 189 2.61 Fred Tenney Vic Willis 116,960
1903 58 80 .420 32 6 .245 578 25 159 3.34 Dick Cooley Vic Willis 143,155
1904 55 98 .359 51 7 .237 491 24 143 3.43 Jim Delahanty Togie Pittinger 140,694
1905 51 103 .331 54.5 7 .234 468 17 132 3.52 Ed Abbaticchio Irv Young 150,003
1906 49 102 .325 66.5 8 .226 408 16 93 3.14 Fred Tenney Irv Young 143,280
1907 58 90 .392 47 7 .243 502 22 120 3.33 Ginger Beaumont Patsy Flaherty 203,221
1908 63 91 .409 36 6 .239 537 17 134 2.79 Ginger Beaumont Cecil Ferguson 253,750
1909 45 108 .294 65.5 8 .223 435 15 135 3.20 Beals Becker Al Mattern 195,188
1910 53 100 .346 50.5 8 .246 495 31 169 3.22 Fred Beck Al Mattern 149,027
1911 44 107 .291 54 8 .267 699 37 152 5.08 Doc Miller Buster Brown 116,000
1912 52 101 .340 52 8 .273 693 35 137 4.17 Bill Sweeney Hub Purdue 121,000
1913 69 82 .457 31.5 5 .256 641 32 177 3.19 Joe Connoly Lefty Tyler 208,000
1914 94 59 .614 --- #*1 .251 657 35 139 2.74 Joe Connoly Dick Rudolph 382,913
1915 83 69 .546 7 2 .240 582 17 121 2.57 Sherry Magee Tom Hughes 376,283
1916 89 63 .586 4 3 .233 542 22 141 2.19 Ed Konetchy Dick Rudolph 313,495
1917 72 81 .471 25.5 6 .246 536 22 155 2.77 Red Smith Art Nehf 174,253
1918 53 71 .427 28.5 7 .244 424 13 83 2.90 Al Wickland Art Nehf 84,938
1919 57 82 .410 38.5 6 .253 465 24 145 3.17 Rabbit Maranville Dick Rudolph 167,401
1920 62 90 .408 30 7 .260 523 23 88 3.54 Tony Boeckel Dana Fillingim 162,483
1921 79 74 .516 15 4 .290 721 61 94 3.90 Ray Powell Joe Oeschger 318,627
1922 53 100 .346 39.5 8 .263 596 32 67 4.37 Ray Powell Frank Miller 167,985
1923 54 100 .351 41.5 7 .273 636 32 57 4.21 Billy Southworth Jesse Barnes 227,802
1924 53 100 .346 40 8 .256 520 25 74 4.46 Casey Stengel Jesse Barnes 117,478
1925 70 83 .458 25 5 .292 708 41 77 4.39 Dick Burrus Larry Benton 313,528
1926 66 86 .434 22 7 .277 624 16 81 4.01 Eddie Brown Johnny Wertz 303,598
1927 60 94 .390 34 7 .279 651 37 100 4.22 Eddie Brown Joe Genewich 288,685
1928 50 103 .327 44.5 7 .275 631 52 60 4.83 Rogers Hornsby Bob Smith 227,001
1929 56 98 .364 43 8 .280 657 33 65 5.12 George Harper Bob Smith 372,351
1930 70 84 .455 22 6 .281 693 66 69 4.91 Wally Berger Socks Siebold 464,835
1931 64 90 .416 37 7 .258 533 34 46 3.90 Wally Berger Ed Brandt 515,005
1932 77 77 .500 13 5 .265 649 63 36 3.53 Wally Berger Huck Betts 507,606
1933 83 71 .539 9 4 .252 552 54 25 2.96 Wally Berger Ed Brandt 517,803
1934 78 73 .517 18 4 .272 683 83 30 4.11 Wally Berger Fred Frankhouse 303,205
1935 38 115 .248 61.5 8 .263 575 75 20 4.93 Wally Berger Bob Smith 232,754
1936 71 83 .461 21 6 .265 631 67 23 3.94 Wally Berger Danny MacFayden 340,585
1937 79 73 .520 16 5 .247 579 63 45 3.22 Gene Moore Jim Turner 385,339
1938 77 75 .507 12 5 .250 561 54 49 3.40 Elbie Fletcher Danny MacFayden 341,149
1939 63 88 .417 32.5 7 .264 572 56 41 3.71 Max West Bill Posedel 285,994

Bushers Book
1940 65 87 .428 34.5 7 .256 623 59 48 4.36 Chet Ross Manny Salvo 241,616
1941 62 92 .403 38 7 .251 592 48 61 3.95 Max West Jim Tobin 263,680
1942 59 89 .399 44 7 .240 515 68 49 3.76 Ernie Lombardi Al Javery 285,332
1943 68 85 .444 36.5 6 .233 465 39 56 3.25 Tommy Holmes Nate Andrews 271,289
1944 65 89 .422 40 6 .246 593 79 37 3.67 Tommy Holmes Jim Tobin 208,691
1945 67 85 .441 30 6 .267 721 101 82 4.04 Tommy Holmes Bob Logan 374,178
1946 81 72 .529 15.5 4 .264 630 44 60 3.35 Tommy Holmes Johnny Sain 969,673
1947 86 68 .558 8 3 .275 701 42 58 3.62 Bob Elliott Warren Spahn 1,277,361
1948 91 62 .595 --- #1 .275 739 95 43 3.37 Bob Elliott Johnny Sain 1,455,439
1949 75 79 .487 22 4 .258 706 103 28 3.99 Bob Elliott Warren Spahn 1,081,795
1950 83 71 .539 8 4 .263 785 148 71 4.14 Earl Torgeson Warren Spahn 944,391
1951 76 78 .494 20.5 4 .262 723 130 80 3.75 Sid Gordon Warren Spahn 487,475
1952 64 89 .418 32 7 .233 569 110 58 3.78 Sid Gordon Warren Spahn 281,278
1953 92 62 .597 13 2 .266 738 156 46 3.30 Eddie Mathews Warren Spahn 1,826,397
1954 89 65 .578 8 3 .265 670 139 54 3.19 Eddie Mathews Lew Burdette 2,131,388
1955 85 69 .552 13.5 2 .261 743 182 42 3.85 Eddie Mathews Warren Spahn 2,005,836
1956 92 62 .597 1 2 .259 709 177 29 3.11 Hank Aaron Warren Spahn 2,046,331
1957 95 59 .617 --- #*1 .269 772 199 35 3.47 Hank Aaron Warren Spahn 2,215,404
1958 92 62 .597 --- #1 .266 675 167 26 3.21 Hank Aaron Lew Burdette 1,971,101
1959 86 70 .551 2 2 .265 724 177 41 3.51 Hank Aaron Warren Spahn 1,749,112
1960 88 66 .571 7 2 .265 724 170 69 3.76 Eddie Mathews Lew Burdette 1,497,799
1961 83 71 .539 10 4 .258 712 188 46 3.89 Hank Aaron Warren Spahn 1,101,441
1962 86 76 .531 15.5 5 .252 730 181 57 3.68 Hank Aaron Warren Spahn 766,921
1963 84 78 .519 15 6 .244 677 139 75 3.27 Hank Aaron Warren Spahn 773,018
1964 88 74 .543 5 5 .272 803 159 53 4.12 Hank Aaron Ken Johnson 910,911
1965 86 76 .531 11 5 .256 708 196 64 3.52 Hank Aaron Tony Cloninger 555,584
1966 85 77 .525 10 5 .263 782 207 59 3.68 Hank Aaron Ken Johnson 1,539,801
1967 77 85 .475 24.5 7 .240 631 158 55 3.47 Hank Aaron Phil Niekro 1,389,222
1968 81 81 .500 16 5 .252 514 80 83 2.92 Hank Aaron Pat Jarvis 1,126,540
1969 93 69 .574 --- w 1 .258 691 141 58 3.53 Hank Aaron Phil Niekro 1,458,320
1970 76 86 .469 26 5 .270 736 160 58 4.33 Hank Aaron Pat Jarvis 1,078,848
1971 82 80 .506 8 3 .257 643 153 57 3.75 Hank Aaron Phil Niekro 1,006,320
1972 70 84 .455 25 4 .258 628 144 47 4.27 Hank Aaron Phil Niekro 752,973
1973 76 85 .472 22.5 5 .266 799 206 84 4.25 Darrell Evans Carl Morton 800,655
1974 88 74 .543 14 3 .249 661 120 72 3.05 Ralph Garr Phil Niekro 981,085
1975 67 94 .416 40.5 5 .244 583 107 55 3.91 Darrell Evans Carl Morton 534,672
1976 70 92 .432 32 6 .245 620 82 74 3.86 Jim Wynn Phil Niekro 818,179
1977 61 101 .377 37 6 .254 678 139 82 4.85 Jeff Burroughs Phil Niekro 872,464
1978 69 93 .426 26 6 .244 600 123 90 4.08 Jeff Burroughs Phil Niekro 904,494
1979 66 94 .413 23.5 6 .256 669 126 98 4.18 Gary Matthews Phil Niekro 769,465

“I bought the Braves for two reasons: To get an autographed ball without pleading for it and to get good seats.”
—Ted Turner, who purchased the Braves in 1976


1980 81 80 .503 11 4 .250 630 144 73 3.77 Dale Murphy Rick Camp 1,048,411
1981 50 56 .472 15 4/5 .243 395 64 98 3.45 Bob Horner Rick Camp 535,418
1982 89 73 .549 --- w 1 .256 739 146 151 3.82 Dale Murphy Phil Niekro 1,801,985
1983 88 74 .543 3 2 .272 746 130 146 3.67 Dale Murphy Craig McMurtry 2,119,935
1984 80 82 .494 12 T-2 .247 632 111 140 3.57 Dale Murphy Rick Mahler 1,724,892
1985 66 96 .407 29 5 .246 632 126 72 4.19 Dale Murphy Rick Mahler 1,350,137
1986 72 89 .447 23.5 6 .250 615 138 93 3.97 Dale Murphy David Palmer 1,387,181
1987 69 92 .429 20.5 5 .258 747 152 135 4.63 Dale Murphy Zane Smith 1,217,402
1988 54 106 .338 39.5 6 .242 555 96 95 4.09 Ron Gant Rick Mahler 848,089
1989 63 97 .394 28 6 .234 584 128 83 3.70 Lonnie Smith John Smoltz 984,930
1990 65 97 .401 26 6 .250 682 162 92 4.58 Ron Gant Charlie Liebrandt 980,129
1991 94 58 .580 --- #w 1 .258 749 141 165 3.49 Ron Gant Tom Glavine 2,140,217
1992 98 64 .605 --- #w 1 .254 682 138 126 3.14 Terry Pendleton Tom Glavine 3,077,400
1993 104 58 .642 --- w 1 .262 767 169 125 3.14 Ron Gant Greg Maddux 3,884,725
1994 68 46 .596 6 2 .267 542 137 48 3.57 Fred McGriff Greg Maddux 2,539,240
1995 90 54 .625 --- #*e 1 .250 645 168 73 3.44 David Justice Greg Maddux 2,561,831
1996 96 66 .593 --- #e 1 .270 773 197 83 3.54 Chipper Jones John Smoltz 2,901,242
1997 101 61 .623 --- e 1 .270 791 174 108 3.18 Chipper Jones Greg Maddux 3,464,488
1998 106 56 .654 --- e 1 .272 826 215 98 3.25 Chipper Jones Greg Maddux 3,360,860
1999 103 59 .636 --- #e 1 .266 840 197 148 3.63 Chipper Jones Kevin Millwood 3,284,901
2000 95 67 .586 --- e 1 .271 810 179 148 4.05 Chipper Jones Greg Maddux 3,234,204
2001 88 74 .543 --- e 1 .260 729 174 85 3.59 Chipper Jones Greg Maddux 2,823,530
2002 101 59 .631 --- e 1 .260 708 164 76 3.13 Chipper Jones Greg Maddux 2,603,482
2003 101 61 .623 --- e 1 .284 907 235 68 4.10 Gary Sheffield Russ Ortiz 2,401,084
2004 96 66 .593 --- e 1 .270 803 178 86 3.74 J.D. Drew Jaret Wright 2,322,565
2005 90 72 .556 --- e 1 .265 769 184 92 3.98 Andruw Jones John Smoltz 2,521,534
2006 79 83 .488 18 3 .270 849 222 52 4.60 Andruw Jones John Smoltz 2,549,522
2007 84 78 .513 5 3 .275 810 176 64 4.11 Chipper Jones Tim Hudson 2,745,203
2008 72 90 .444 20 4 .270 753 130 58 4.46 Chipper Jones Jair Jurrjens 2,532,834
2009 86 76 .531 8 3 .263 735 149 58 3.57 Brian McCann Jair Jurrjens 2,373,631
2010 91 71 .562 6 ! 2 .258 738 139 63 3.56 Martin Prado Tim Hudson 2,510,119
2011 89 73 .549 13 2 .243 641 173 77 3.48 Freddie Freeman Craig Kimbrel 2,372,940
2012 94 68 .580 4 ! 2 .247 700 149 101 3.42 Jason Heyward Craig Kimbrel 2,420,171
2013 96 66 .593 --- e 1 .249 688 181 64 3.18 Freddie Freeman Craig Kimbrel 2,548,679
2014 79 83 .488 17 T-2 .241 573 123 95 3.38 Freddie Freeman Craig Kimbrel 2,354,305
2015 67 95 .414 23 4 .251 573 100 69 4.41 Freddie Freeman Shelby Miller 2,001,392

How does This Great Game determine the best hitters and pitchers? Find out here.


Highlights of the Braves' History on This Great Game:

1914 baseball history1914: The Miracle Braves Cellar-bound in July, the usually hapless Boston Braves perform one of the game's greatest turnarounds.


1935 baseball history1935: The Babe's Bittersweet Bow Out Babe Ruth's final year in the majors is full of decline, frustration—and one last marvel of immortality.


1953 baseball history1953: Brave New World After 50 years of geographical entrenchment, baseball begins an active era of relocation and makes Milwaukee its first benefactor.


1957 baseball history1957: If Casey Had a Hammer Hank Aaron ascends to the superstar elite and gives Milwaukee its first World Series title.


1974 baseball history1974: "I'm Just Glad It’s Over" Hank Aaron's long and personally painful ride to home run history comes to a successful conclusion.


1991 baseball history1991: From Worst to First Out of nowhere, the Minnesota Twins and Atlanta Braves leap to the top and put on one of the most memorable World Series.


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The Braves by the Decade


19th Century The longest continuing major league franchise, the Braves were founded in 1871 as one of nine charter members of the National Association by baseball’s Wright Brothers, Harry and George. The Red Stockings, as they were originally named, dominated the NA with four pennants before the league broke up and the team fled to the National League for that circuit’s inaugural 1876 campaign. More success followed, with eight more pennants—including four during the 1890s behind pitching rock Kid Nichols (who averaged nearly 30 wins during the decade) and a bludgeoning 1894 squad that hit .331, scored nine runs per game and was paced by Hugh Duffy’s .440 average—the highest ever recorded, modern or pre-modern.


1900s The franchise tumbled badly into the new century, stung by the birth of the crosstown AL Red Sox and a severe lack of stability created from a merry-go-round of changing ownership. Horrible hitting made life terrible for the pitching staff; in back-to-back years (1905-06), Boston fielded four 20-game losers. Hall-of-Fame pitcher Vic Willis suffered the worst of the punishment, losing a modern-era 29 games in 1905 before escaping to a far superior Pittsburgh team.


1910s The Braves’ losing ways got worse before things got better—and when they did, it came with blindsiding force, streaking out of last place midway through the 1914 season like a team possessed to capture the NL pennant in advance of a remarkable sweep of the heavily-favored Philadelphia Athletics in the World Series. The spoils of the “Miracle Braves” championship included several years of stability and a new home (the 43,000-seat Braves Field, at the time the majors’ largest ballpark), but futility returned by decade’s end.


1920s The Braves played the role of lambs during the Roarin’ Twenties, falling behind the times by maintaining a deadball era attitude while the rest of baseball powered up. Only once during the decade did the Braves manage a winning season (in 1921, at 79-74) but otherwise lost a yearly average of 95 games—ironically bottoming out in 1928 despite the presence of star hitter Rogers Hornsby, who managed to escape after one year. Judge Emil Fuchs, who bought the Braves in 1923, showed his displeasure for the lack of progress by naming himself manager in 1929 (he lost 98 games).


1930s Respectability returned to the franchise early in the 1930s thanks to esteemed manager Bill McKechnie and power hitter Wally Berger, who almost single-handedly shouldered the Braves’ offense for six years. But it all fell apart in 1935 when Fuchs brought in an aging Babe Ruth with the (empty) promise of front office involvement, resulting in a 38-115 record that’s the worst in modern NL history. In an attempt to shed the losing image, the Braves were renamed the Bees in 1936; the rebrand lasted only five years.


1940s The Braves struggled through the war years, failing to shake their standing as second division nomads despite the star exploits of outfielder Tommy Holmes. But worldwide peace brought new hope for the team, and the emergence of Warren Spahn and Johnny Sain—A-list pitchers the Braves had badly lacked for 30 years—gradually helped lift the team to contender status, peaking in 1948 with its first NL pennant in 34 years before losing a six-game World Series to Cleveland.


1950s An early-decade decline in play led to a stunning collapse at the gate, forcing owner Lou Perini to okay the majors’ first relocation in 50 years when he shifted the Braves to Milwaukee. The move’s impact was instant and historic; the Braves shattered NL attendance records in Wisconsin, and the team responded with two NL pennants and a world championship in 1957 behind future Hall-of-Famers Hank Aaron, Eddie Mathews and Spahn, who averaged 20 wins per year during the 1950s.


1960s The honeymoon had barely ended in Milwaukee when the divorce took place. A combination of fan complacency and dissatisfaction with ownership led to an unexpected second move by the Braves in 13 years; Atlanta would be the next stop. Constant success became more fleeting but the Braves remained entertaining on the field, with Aaron continuing to dominate. Atlanta’s first postseason appearance took place in 1969 but the Braves fell short in the inaugural NLCS to that “other” miracle team, the New York Mets.


1970s The Braves entered a substandard period that was offset, early in the decade, by Aaron’s high-profile chase of Babe Ruth’s all-time home run record; exhausted and often mentally tortured by the limelight and bigoted hate mail, Aaron finally surpassed Ruth with his 715th career homer in 1974. A hangover ensued for the franchise and attendance began to sag; the late 1970s were notable only for the colorful (and often annoying, to other owners) shenanigans of new Atlanta lord Ted Turner and the knuckleballing antics of tireless pitcher Phil Niekro.


1980s The Braves finally found solid footing in 1982 when they were sparked by squeaky-clean slugger Dale Murphy and a solid supporting cast to earn their first postseason appearance in 13 years. The resurgence re-awoke Atlanta fans and the Braves enjoyed a national following through Turner’s nationwide cable outlet WTBS, self-proclaiming themselves as “America’s Team.” But reality set back in during the late 1980s as the Braves badly regressed in the standings—and at the gate.


1990s After another last-place finish to start the decade, the Braves stunned the nation with an unprecedented worst-to-first campaign, riding excellent pitching from John Smoltz and Tom Glavine and spirited leadership from third baseman Terry Pendleton to the World Series—where they lost a memorable seven-game set to Minnesota. Hooking in future Hall-of-Famers in ace pitcher Greg Maddux and infielder Chipper Jones only heightened the Braves’ decade of dominance—finishing first in their division every year throughout the 1990s except the strike-shortened 1994 season. Postseason play proved much less successful, as the Braves snagged only one World Series title, in 1995.


2000s The Braves maintained their excellence through 2005 behind the veteran and crusty manager Bobby Cox, but success continued to elude them in the postseason, failing even to win one NL pennant. After placing first for 14 of 15 seasons, the Braves finally slid toward commonality, showing signs of a rebirth at decade’s end with a refreshed rotation led by Tim Hudson and Jair Jurrjens. Through it all, Chipper Jones remained the team leader, playing at an All-Star level well into his 30s to help keep the Braves respectable.


2010s Cox presided over one final season to start that led him back to the postseason; he gave way to Fredi Gonzalez, who oversaw continued success behind a fresh crop of promising talent including tape-measure artist Jason Heyward, tough-as-nails first baseman Freddie Freeman and closer extraordinaire Craig Kimbrel. But a mid-decade housecleaning in advance of the opening of Sun Trust Park (replacing the barely 20-year-old Turner Field) has led to a lame duck period in Atlanta.


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